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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"



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DATE HELD 



Aug. 6, 1975 



Sept. 3, 1975 



Sept. 11, 1975 (Special 

Meeting) 

Oct. 1, 1975 



Nov. 5, 1975 



Dec. 3, 1975 



Feb. 4, 1976 



Mar. 3, 1976 



Apr. 7, 19 7 6 



May 5, 1976 



June 2, 1976 



June 14, 1976 (Reconvened 

Meeting) 

June 21, 1976 (Reconvened 

Meeting) 

June 28, 1976 (Reconvened 

Meeting) 

Aug. 4, 1976 



Sept. 8, 1976 



BOARD MINUTES 

TIME 
4:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 



'2:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 



FY 1976 



WHERE 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Harbor Campus UM/Boston 

Campus Center, Room 1009 
UM/ Amherst 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Harbor Campus UM/Boston 

Faculty Conference Room 
UM/Worcester 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

Campus Center, Room 1009 
UM/ Amherst 

Faculty Conference Room 
Medical Sciences Bldg 
UM/Worcester 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

The University Library 
UM/Amherst 

21st Floor Conference Room 
1 Ashburton Place, Boston 

21st Floor Conference Room 
1 Ashburton Place, Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
UM/Boston 



-page 1 of 2- 



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BOARD MINUTES 



I 



DATE HELD 
Oct. 6, 1976 

Nov. 3, 1976 
Dec. 1, 1976 

Feb. 2, 1977 



Mar. 2, 1977 



Apr. 6, 1977 



May 4, 1977 



May 18, 1977 (Special) 



June 1, 1977 



June 23, 1977 (Special) 



TIME 
2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. 



2:00 p.m. 



11:00 a.m. 



10:00 a.m. 



2:00 p.m. 



11:00 a.m. 



WHERE 

Faculty Conference Room 
Medical Sciences Bldg. 
UM/Worcester 

Auditorium/Memorial Hall 
UM/Amherst 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus, UM/Boston 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus, UM/Boston 

Whitmore Administration and 

Memorial Hall 

UM/Amherst 

Faculty Conference Room 
Medical Sciences Building 
UM/Worcester 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus, UM/Boston 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus, UM/Boston 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 



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-page 2 of 2- 



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TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

August 6, 1975; 4:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trust- 
ees Abrams, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Eddy, Gordon, Knowles, O'Keefe, 
Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Snowden, Spiller, Troy, Winthrop; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder; Ms. 
Judd, Ms. Rasmussen 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; 
Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and Manage- 
ment; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, Assistant to the 
President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Ms. Stack, Grad- 
uate Student Representative; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Represen- 
tative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance" Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and Con- 
trol; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean 
for Administrative Affairs and Hospital Director; Mr. Cathey, Con- 
troller; Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Provost; 
Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Hospital 
Chief of Staff 

Guests : Dr. Francis Chlapowski and Dr. Charles Regan, UM/Worcester 
Faculty members; Ms. Annette Guttenberg, UM/Amherst student; Mr. 
Michael Parkhurst, Student Legal Services, UM/Amherst 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees present 
and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at A: 20 p.m. 
The first item of business was the consideration of the minutes of 
the previous meeting. Upon a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
June 4, 1975. 

Chairman Healey recognized the President. President Wood 
turned to the matter of the University budget, explaining that he 
had testified that morning before hearings of the House Ways & 



3963 



Consideration of 
Minutes of Pre- 
vious Meeting 



President ' s 
Remarks 



3 9 64 



8-6-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Budget Hearings Means Committee, along with Secretary Parks and the Chancellors 
Before House Ways Among his remarks, he said, was that the $118.3 million FY 1976 



& Means 



TRUSTEE 



Opening of Uni- 
versity Hospital 



budget authorized by the Trustees at their October 1974 meeting 
had been an honest budget which served the University's real needs. 
In mid-1974, he said, it was expected that the Commonwealth's 
budget deficit would be in the neighborhood of $30 million. A 
year later, the fiscal condition of the State had changed. Before 
the House Committee, said the President, he had stated that al- 
though a $109 million budget was to be preferred, he was prepared 
to ask the Trustees for a budget of $103.6 million. 

The President described this budget as a standstill pro- 
posal which he was proposing reluctantly. The University could 
live with it for a year, but it would be necessary to come back 
and recoup its losses next year. He said House 1 was a punitive, 
irrational proposal which would necessitate the layoff of 500 em- 
ployees, the suspension of aid to 1000 students, and the possible 
closing of the University's field stations or of academic programs. 



At 
Chairman of 
the Trustees 
sident's off 
budget level 
versity. He 
$118 million 
responsible 
1974. 



this time, the President called on Trustee Carlson, 
the Trustee Budget Committee. Trustee Carlson informed 

that his committee had worked closely with the Pre- 
ice and the Chancellors in trying to determine what 
s were feasible for the minimal operation of the Uni- 

confirmed the statement of the President that the 

budget request approved by the Trustees had been 
in the conditions as they were understood in October 



At the committee's June meeting, it had been stated that 
a budget of $109 million, in view of the Commonwealth's fiscal con- 
dition, would be needed to meet the mandatory commitment to cover 
inflationary costs and fixed costs. The figure of $103.6 million, 
however, would allow the meeting of the cost of authorized per- 
sonnel, would meet the cost of statutory mandated step increases, 
and would allow the maintenance of the library acquisition program 
and financial aid programs. It would not cover, however, any new 
positions nor any inflationary increases in nonpersonnel accounts 
such as fuel, nor professional or faculty salary increases. This 
and all other expenses would have to be met by internal realloca- 
tions and transfers, and might entail adjustments of academic pro- 
grams on all campuses. He then moved that the Trustees approve 
the budget reduction. 

President Wood next informed the Trustees of the second 
part of his testimony, which had concerned the University hospital 
at UM/Worcester . It had been revealed, he said, that House 1 
failed to make any provision for the hospital, and it had become 
clear from an exchange between Acting Dean Butcher and the Chair- 
man of the Committee that the lack of an appropriation would post- 
pone the hospital opening for at least a year or, in Dean Butcher's 
phrase, "scuttle the hospital." At the same time, said the 



» 



1 



1 



TRUSTEE 



\ 



m 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President, Secretary Parks had proposed at this critical time the 
establishment of a Health Maintenance Organization at the hospital. 
The President called on Trustee Robertson for a statement on this 
subj ect . 

Trustee Robertson observed that ten years of planning and 
a $130-million investment had gone into the development of the 
medical center. He said the Medical School had acquired a high- 
quality faculty from all around the country and the world, and 
added that there was in the medical community of central Massa- 
chusetts an acknowledged necessity for a first-class medical school. 
He said he had consulted the administrators of each of the four 
major Worcester hospitals and they were uniformly against the pre- 
paid medical plan (HMO) as detrimental to the medical profession 
of central Massachusetts. It was the view of these administrators, 
he added, that: 

1. a teaching hospital was essential to a high- 
quality medical school; 

2. such a hospital should have tertiary care as 
a prime purpose; 

3. a hospital is needed for the area's total health 
care delivery system; 

4. the hospital and medical school will lose its 
most qualified faculty if the hospital con- 
tinues to be a political football; and 

5. the hospital should be opened, as planned, as 
soon as possible. 

Trustee Robertson continued that the Comprehensive Health 
Planning Council of Central Massachusetts had expressed firm oppo- 
sition to Secretary Parks ' s proposal, calling it "disastrous" and 
a direct violation of agreed-upon policy because an HMO would create 
a surplus of hospital beds for ordinary care at the University hos- 
pital and conflict with its role as a referral center. Among the 
effects would be an exodus of the Medical School's most competent 
faculty, which would reduce the school to mediocrity. 

Trustee Robertson said the proposal for a hospital had 
been studied and approved by a host of individuals and committees 
over a period of ten years. To delay would adversely affect the 
quality of education in the short and long term, and it would be 
fiscally irresponsible, in light of the investment made by the 
Commonwealth, to keep the facility from productive use. He said 
it would cost $1.5 million to keep the hospital idle for the re- 
mainder of the fiscal year, and he described the hospital as the 
only state educational facility that would generate significant 
revenue and be self-sustaining in four years. 



3965 



8-6-75 



Statement of 
Trustee Robertson 



3966 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



Statement of 
Trustee Gordon 



Statement of 
Trustee Croce 



Tuition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He laid great stress on the costs in lost faculty and lost 
opportunity for recruiting other, needed faculty members if the 
hospital is jeopardized. If this happens, he said, it will trend 
the Medical School toward mediocrity which, he said, would certainly 
be against the wishes of the Governor, the Secretary of Educational 
Affairs, the Legislature, and the citizens of the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Gordon. Trustee Gordon 
pointed out that the Board of Trustees had been involved with the 
planning for the Medical School and University hospital for many 
years. He said it was distressing that members of the Legislature 
did not realize that House 1 included no recommendation for the 
University hospital. He observed that the Medical School and Uni- 
versity hospital were an "inescapable reality" which the executive 
and legislative branches, as well as citizens, should come to 
terms with. A great investment has been made in the medical center, 
he said. Further, he pointed out that a search was under way for 
a new Dean/Chancellor of the school, and he said he did not see 
how anybody could take this job with the present cloud hanging 
over the hospital. 

Speaking of the budget as a whole, Trustee Gordon said 
that it began with campus requests totalling $130 million, which 
had been pared down by careful study and work by all parties con- 
cerned. House 1 represented a $40 million cut from the original 
campus requests. The request for a University budget of $103 
million and a University hospital budget of $5.5 million, he ob- 
served, represented more than 20 percent cuts from the original 
requests. In conclusion, he said, he would vote reluctantly for 
this adjusted request in order to get the work of the medical 
center moving. 

Trustee Croce expressed his strong support for Trustee 
Robertson's statement. He said the Medical School had weathered 
a major crisis early in its development when the previous adminis- 
tration had said it would take "another hard look" at building it, 
and he said it is at another crisis with the endangering of the 
University hospital. Without the hospital, he said, the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Medical School would be a second-rate 
institution. 

The Chairman called for action on the motion, and it was 
seconded and 

VOTED : To reduce the University of Massachusetts FY 1976 
budget request from $118.3 million to $103.6 
million and to reduce the University hospital re- 
quest from $7.8 million to $5.5 million. 

The President next turned to the matter of tuition. He 
observed that legislative leaders had called for a reconsideration 
of the rate of tuition. These and other calls, he said, were 
responsible, and he said he had discussed the possibilities of 



I 



I 



TRUSTEE 



396? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

raising tuition with members of the Board of Trustees and with 
colleagues in public higher education. He described himself as a 
"low tuition or no tuition" person by philosophy, committed to 
access to public higher education. He added that he recognized 
the fiscal problems faced by private higher education. At the 
same time, however, he said that no tuition increase by public 
higher education could resolve the fiscal crisis of the state or 
fund the University. He would continue the discussions with mem- 
bers of public and private segments of higher education and said 
he hoped it could be resolved after the resolution of the current 
budget issue. A further report would be made to the Board, he 
said, at the September meeting. 

The President then reminded the Trustees of their actions 
on June 4 and June 25 in mandating certain management and organiza- 
tion changes in the University as recommended by the consultant 
firm of Hay Associates. He said the association with Hay would 
continue for the further study of compensation and personnel sched- 
ules. He reported that, at the direction of the Trustees, the 
Advisory Committee on Job Content Measurement had been formed, 
members had been appointed and the process of measuring job content 
for professional, nonacademic staff had begun. He also revealed 
the formation of the Organization Design Review Committee to ad- 
vise the President on matters of organization and structure. He 
said the composition of the committee had been approved by the 
Board of Trustees on June 25 and added that it would begin work 
as soon as its Chairman, Father Michael Walsh, returned from 
Ireland. Trustees Spiller and Robertson, aided by Secretary 
Hardy, had agreed to serve on this Committee. 

Continuing his report, the President informed the members 
of the Board that Father Walsh had assumed the leadership of the 
search for the new Vice President for Management. The President 
mentioned also that Coopers & Lybrand would be completing their 
report soon on ways to strengthen the University's internal audit 
and control mechanism. 

President Wood observed that, although he was aware of 
faculty concern about the process of administrative and management 
reorganization, it was his view that this was an area which did 
not have an impact on governance or academic matters. Perceptions, 
however, were real in themselves, he said, and he stressed that 
there would therefore be the widest possible dissemination and 
communication with campus groups in the months to come. He re- 
called his statement last September to the Board that this was 
a hard time for faculty: they were being pressed by legislatively- 
mandated contact hour requirements, merit increases had been sus- 
pended, and they were being subjected to a new wave of anti- 
intellectualism which was sweeping the country. In addition, he 
said, they were hit with the change, in a short period of time, 
from a period of affluence to a period of austerity. 



8-6-75 



Implementation 
of Hay Asso- 
ciates Report 



3968 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For these reasons, said the President, he would encourage 
a high level of communication with governing bodies on the part 
of the Trustees and his staff in coming months on the directions 
being taken in the reorganization process. He said he would also 
encourage the continued active participation of the faculty 
representative in Board activities and would encourage frequent 
formal and informal meetings between faculty, Trustees, and mem- 
bers of the central administration. 

President Wood turned next to the School of Education. 
He informed the members of the Board that they had reports in their 
folders of the Faculty Senate Review Committee and the Visiting 
Committee for the School of Education. He said he would be making 
further reports, as soon as the internal and external audits and 
legal activity were completed. At this point he called on Vice 
President Lynton to describe some of the highlights of the com- 
mittee reports. 

Mr. Lynton observed that both committee reports were 
reassuring as to the basic strength of the School of Education, 
citing generally first-rate and vigorous faculty and students, 
the national eminence which the school had achieved in a short 
time, and the commitment to reexamine basic educational assump- 
tions. Both committees also examined doctoral dissertations and 
found that the School on the whole maintained standards which belie 
accusations of a "diploma mill." 

Amid these strongly supportive statements, however, 
both reports were critical of the organization and governance of 
the school, and called for major changes. There appeared to be 
significant confusion and overlap in the programmatic "cluster" 
system which would bear rectification. There existed also con- 
siderable confusion between academic organization and governance, 
as well as between roles of students, faculty, and administration. 
The Visiting Committee recommended that a group be formed in the 
coming academic year to study the future role of the School of 
Education within the University and the Commonwealth. He observed 
that Chancellor Bromery had begun to take steps to implement some 
of the recommendations of the two reports. 

Continuing his remarks, Mr. Lynton informed the Trustees 
that the studies found the attitude that the ends justify the means 
seemed to prevail in the administration of grants and contracts, 
as well as the idea that existing procedures and policies merely 
serve to inhibit unorthodox programs and activities. However, the 
School often bypassed these procedures, rather than trying to 
change them. In most cases, he said, this was done to achieve 
wothwhile goals, but it resulted in expenditures which, upon 
audit, were likely to be disallowed by the grantor. He cited, 
as an example, the use of funds intended for travel or honoraria 
in the grant budget as a way of providing financial aid to needy 
students. There was also considerable sloppiness in such procedures 
as the authorization of signatures, the documentation of expenses 
and the like. These oversights added up to poor judgment and 
poor management, he said. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton made the point that in such a situation actual 
misuse of funds was a clear danger. It was fortunate, however, 
that although substantial grant and contract funds were handled by 
the School over the past several years, only a small fraction was 
actually misused. Of course, he added, any misuse is intolerable. 
He recalled that substantial changes in the management of grants 
and contracts had been implemented upon recommendations of Trea- 
surer Johnson, which had been approved by the Board in April, and 
said that detailed and complete recommendations of Coopers & 
Lybrand would be submitted to the Finance Committee later in August. 

President Wood next told the members of the Board that 
he had received the final report of the Search Committee for a new 
Dean/Chancellor of the Medical School. He indicated the difficulty, 
as described earlier by Trustees Robertson and Gordon, of carrying 
out this process while the University hospital has again been 
thrown into question. He said he wished to express, however, his 
deep appreciation and respect for the work of the Committee. In 
many years in academic life, he said, he had seldom encountered a 
search process conducted more professionally, creatively, thoroughly 
or imaginatively. He thanked each member of the Committee, es- 
pecially its Chairman, Dr. Karl Hittelman, and its Trustee members, 
Dr. Croce and Dr. Abrams. 

In twenty-three meetings since its formation, he said, 
the Committee had received 152 nominations. Fifty-two of these 
candidates had accepted their candidacies and were reviewed by the 
Committee. Eleven were finally invited for interview. Each of 
these met for two days with the Executive Faculty and General 
Faculty, the administration, students, members of the Worcester 
Hospital Consortium and representatives of the President's office. 
An average of 40 persons met with each candidate, and group im- 
pressions and evaluations were provided to the Committee. He said 
he was in the process of reviewing the recommendations of the Com- 
mittee and would make a recommendation to the Board of Trustees 
as soon as it seemed appropriate to offer an invitation. 

The President next reminded the Trustees of his long- 
standing policy of revealing his outside income from honoraria 
and stipends, etc. He said he had continued his Trusteeship of 
the Kettering Foundation of Dayton, Ohio, for which he had been 
compensated $2500 and he had given a few talks about urban affairs 
during the year with honoraria totalling $2100. Unfortunately, he 
said, his author's royalties had dwindled to $427.95. 

President Wood informed the Board of Trustees of the 
resignation of William R. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 
tration and Finance, UM/Boston, who wished to return to teaching. 
He said that in the near future he would present specific means for 
bringing about this change to the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy and the Executive Committee. He asked Vice Chancell 
Hamilton for his remarks. Vice Chancellor Hamilton thanked the 



3969 



8-6-75 



UM/ Wore ester — 
Dean /Chancellor 
Search 






Income of the 
President 



UM/Boston — 
Resignation of 
Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 



or 



^ 



3970 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UM/ Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester-- 
Acting Dean's 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Board of Trustees for its continuing support in the construction 
of the Harbor Campus, and he thanked the President for his support 
at critical points along the way. Though he was initiating this 
change with some sadness, he said, he was looking forward to 
getting back to his first love, the students and the classroom. 

President Wood next called upon Chancellor Bromery of 
the Amherst campus. Chancellor Bromery reported that he wished 
to report on his plans for further changes at the School of Educa- 
tion in the future. He described both the Visiting Committee and 
Faculty Senate committee reports as balanced, fair, and extremely 
constructive and said they provided important guidance as to how 
to proceed to preserve the impressive gains the School of Education 
has made while, at the same time, modifying those aspects of the 
School's activities which were justly subject to criticism. 

Among his planned actions were: (1) the appointment of 
a search committee to find a new dean, (2) the appointment of a 
Task Force on Curricular and Programmatic Organization to develop 
recommendations for internal academic reorganization, (3) the 
appointment of a Task Force on Governance to develop recommendations 
for clearer delineation and separation of areas of faculty respon- 
sibility and administrative responsibility, (4) the appointment of 
a standing committee whose charge would be to evaluate on a con- 
tinuing basis the innovative programs and processes of the School 
of Education. The membership of this committee will be drawn 
from both on campus and off campus. And (5) the appointment of 
a committee which would be asked to make recommendations concerning 
fundamental questions of policy with regard to the future, and 
future direction of, the School of Education. 

After Chancellor Bromery 's remarks, the President called 
upon Chancellor Golino of the Boston Campus. Chancellor Golino 
spoke of his sense of loss at the resignation of Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton. In his two years as Chancellor, he said, he had found 
Mr. Hamilton's advice to be a great sense of strength. At the 
same time, he said, he understood his desire to return to the 
classroom. He concluded with the statement that Mr. Hamilton's 
contribution to the Harbor Campus was obvious every day, and he 
thanked him for his dedication. 

The President called next on Dr. Butcher, Acting Dean of 
UM/Worcester . Dr. Butcher reported that the period since the 
last meeting of the Board had been busy for the Medical School, 
then and still preparing for the entry of 100 students in the 
fall as well as for the hoped-for hospital opening. For some 
reason, he said, despite all the difficulties with the budget and 
the consequent austerity program, morale at the Medical School was 
still high. Finally, he said the strong supportive statements of 
members of the Board for the Medical School and University hos- 
pital would serve to maintain that morale. 



I 



1 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This completed the report of the President, and Chairman 
Healey called for the reports of the standing committees. The 
first committee report was that of Trustee Rowland, Chairman of 
the Long-Range Planning Committee. Trustee Rowland reported that 
most of the meeting of June 24 had been devoted to a discussion of 
issues related to graduate education and off-campus programs which 
arose from the Committee's nine-month effort to develop planning 
guidelines for the Amherst campus. This discussion, she said, was 
covered in the minutes of the meeting and will be continued at 
subsequent meetings of the committee. 

The next issue, for which the Committee was asking for 
a vote, was that of a statement of development priorities for the 
Boston campus. Though this issue was addressed by the Committee 
in response to the request of the Chancellor and a series of rec- 
ommendations by the University Assembly growing out of the New 
Directions Committee report of the Boston campus, the statement of 
priorities upon which the Trustees were being asked to vote reflect 
the Long-Range Planning Committee's own view of priorities in the 
context of University-wide needs and directions. 

Recognizing that priorities are a function of order and 
phasing, the first priority, said Trustee Rowland, was to meet 
the primary obligation for undergraduate education and to serve 
the needs of transfer, older and part-time students, as well as to 
provide diverse programs for the traditional undergraduate student. 
These needs, she emphasized, must be met through continued growth 
in enrollment within the guidelines adopted by the Trustees in 
June 1974. 

The next priority, she said, was to attend to the marked 
deficiency of counseling, financial aid, basic skills, and other 
support services so crucial to genuine access for low-income and 
underprepared students. 

Thirdly, the Committee viewed the development of graduate 
programs as appropriate for the campus in attaining full-fledged 
university status. However, the development of such programs, she 
stressed, must be gradual, selective, and in full accordance with 
a campus-wide plan and University-wide priorities and needs. 

Chancellor Golino had indicated his agreement with the 
policy statement, which had also been shared with members of the 
Multi-campus Planning and Budget Committees. 

A motion was made and seconded and it was 

VOTED : To commend the serious and important work of the 
New Directions Committee and the University 
Assembly of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston under the coordination of the Chancellor, 
and: 



3971 



8-6-75 

Committee on 

Long-Range 

Planning 

UM/Amherst — 

Planning 

Guidelines 



UM/Boston — 
Development 
Priorities 



3972 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



Committee on Fac 
ulty and Educa- 
tional Policy 

Tenure Appoint- 
ments 

(Docs. T75-151, 
T75-152) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

While welcoming the continued development and 
evaluation of their recommendations for campus 
policy and programs, to adopt the following 
policy statement (Doc. T75-167) on priorities 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston: 

Throughout its brief history, the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston has attempted to respond to a variety of often conflicting 
ideas with regard to programmatic direction, admissions policies 
and resource allocations. Curent fiscal constraints make it clear 
that these conflicts cannot be resolved by pursuing an ever- 
widening agenda of commitments. Hard choices will have to be made 
with regard to the use of increasingly limited resources. In this 
context and with fresh acknowledgement of the continued importance 
of the University throughout the state and within the Boston urban 
area the Board of Trustees adopts the following priorities for 
the University of Massachusetts/Boston: 

1) Continued undergraduate growth within the Board of Trustees' 
June 1974 enrollment guidelines and ceiling in order to ensure: 

a) Broad educational opportunity for the people of metro- 
politan Boston and adjacent communities; 

b) additional program diversity through the continued growth 
of Colleges III and IV and development of a range of 
relevant professional program options; 

c) maximum effective use of existing capital investment 
and consequent decreased costs per student in a time 
of constrained resources; 

d) an appropriate commitment to part-time and nontraditional 
students, including development of an extended day program. 

2) Effective and increased access not only through program growth 
and -diversification but through active recruitment, and ade- 
quate counseling, testing, support services, basic skills pro- 
grams and financial aid. 

3) Gradual development of selected graduate programs consistent 
with the achievement of priorities 1 and 2 and within the con- 
text of an approved campus-wide plan and University-wide 
priorities and needs. 

The Chairman called next on the Chairman of the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy, Trustee Troy. Trustee Troy 
reported that the first item of business at the meeting of June 18 
had been several late Tenure Appointments at UM/Amherst and UM/ 
Boston (Docs. T75-151, T75-152) . A total of nine appointments 
were to have been considered, and Mr. Lynton had explained that 
various delays of an administrative nature had prevented these 
appointments from coming to the Board in June. The Committee had 
entered executive session to discuss the cases specifically, and 



I 



1 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

after executive session had voted to recommend them to the full 
Board. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointments to 

tenure at the University of Massachusetts at Am- 
herst, as set forth in Doc. T75-151. 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointments to 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, as set forth in Doc. T75-152. 

Trustee Knowles abstained from the UM/Boston tenure vote. 

Trustee Troy next reported that Professor Gagnon, Faculty 
Representative from UM/Boston, had expressed the concern of some 
UM/Boston faculty members about the rights of faculty members who 
have been denied tenure by the President despite favorable rec- 
ommendations from the campus at all levels to appeal to the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy for a review of their cases 
It was pointed out that, since the Board had delegated the final 
power to grant tenure to the President, the Committee now limits 
its appeal consideration to a review of the full written record 
after an appellant has gone through the various channels of campus 
appeal. It was also emphasized that the Committee's actions will 
he limited to either a request that the President reconsider or a 
decision in agreement with his decision. The Committee had also 
discussed what could properly constitute the full written record, 
and it was agreed that it should be inclusive rather than narrowly 
defined. 

The Committee, said Trustee Troy, next heard a progress 
report on the proposed departmental organization of the Medical 
School from Acting Dean Butcher. The aim of the process was to 
seek new principles of organization for the medical school depart- 
ments, and to replace some of the fragmented structures of recent 
years with a more inclusive system of departments. It had been 
observed that, as in the arts and sciences, it is necessary to 
strike a balance between too much fragmentation and too much 
consolidation. 

The Committee then heard a request for the Establishment 
of a Department of Anesthesiology at U M/ Worcester (Doc. T75-150) . 
Trustee Troy said that Dr. wheeler had explained that Anesthesiology) 
is a separate department in most medical schools because of its 
very heavy responsibilities. He had also pointed out that it would 
be extremely difficult to recruit top-quality people to staff such 
a discipline were it not a department. Upon a motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Anesthesiology 
at the University of Massachusetts at Wor- 
cester, as set forth in Doc. T75-150. 



3973 



8-6-75 



Tenure Grievance 
Procedure 



UM/Worcester — 

Departmental 

Organization 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment of 
a Department of 
Anesthesiology 
(Doc. T75-150) 



3974 



8-6-75 

UM/ Worcester — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-149) 

TRUSTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Establishment of 
a Department of 
Professional Pre- 
paration in Phys- 
ical Education 
and Dance 
(Doc. T75-143) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Troy directed the Board's attention to the pro- 
posed New Appointment with Tenure at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-159). 
Drs. Wheeler and Butcher had spoken very highly of the qualifica- 
tions of Dr. Michael d'Arcy Stanton-Hicks, who was recommended 
for the position of Professor of Anesthesiology. They observed 
that he had been the unanimous choice of the Executive Committee 
of the faculty. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointment of 
Dr. Michael d'Arcy Stanton-Hicks as Professor 
of Anesthesiology with tenure at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Worcester, as set 
forth in Doc. T75-149. 

Two proposals for reorganization within the School of 
Physical Education at UM/ Amherst had then been considered. These 
proposals involved the creation of two departments, and constituted 
part of an ongoing organization within the School of Physical 
Education. The first was the Establishment of a Department of 
Professional Preparation in Physical Education and Dance (Doc. T75- 
143) . Trustee Rowland reminded Trustee Troy of her request two 
years ago, when she had suggested that the program of dance properly 
belongs among the performing and visual arts, not in the School 
of Physical Education. She understood that Vice President Lynton 
had tried to reach her on this matter — "to sooth" her. Trustee 
Troy expressed his agreement, but stated he did not have the power 
to do this. Mr. Lynton took the opportunity to publicly "sooth" 
and assure Trustee Rowland that active plans were under way to 
transfer the dance program into the Music Department, and said the 
present rearrangement of existing dpeartments would not inhibit 
this process. 

The President suggested that Acting Provost Alfange 
could add further information on this point. Mr. Alfange reported 
that he had signed a memorandum provisionally transferring the 
study of dance to the Department of Music — which then would be 
redesignated the Department of Music and Dance — to become effective 
next year. He had also signed a memorandum, he said, authorizing 
the transfer at that time of the faculty of Dance from the School 
of Physical Education to the Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts. 
However, he explained, the changing of the names of two depart- 
ments must go through the mechanics of the Faculty Senate and 
ultimately be presented to the Board of Trustees. This, Mr. 
Alfange said, he hoped would be completed for next year. 

Chairman Healey asked if Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative of UM/ Amherst, would commit the faculty to this 
change. Professor Wilkinson informed the Trustees that he served 
on the Academic Matters Council of the Faculty Senate and that 
the dance transfer was first on the Council's agenda for its. 
September meeting. Once the change was made at that level, he 
said, the matter could come to the Board in October. A motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 



\ 



TRUSTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Professional Pre- 
paration in Physical Education and Dance at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set 
forth in Doc. T75-143. 

Trustees Rowland and Gordon abstained from the vote. 

The second, related vote was for the proposed Establish- 
ment of a Department of Sports Studies (Doc. T75-142) . Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Sports Studies at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as 
set forth in Doc. T75-142. 

Trustee Troy next reminded the Trustees that they had 
created, more than a year earlier, an MBA program in cooperation 
with Pierce College in Athens, Greece. After consideration this 
year, it had been recommended that the program be granted a ter- 
minal extension, since the size of the program did not justify the 
amount of faculty and administrative time devoted to it. Trustee 
Troy read the vote for a Terminal Extension of the MBA Program in 
Greece (Doc. T75-142) . A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To grant a terminal extension to the "Memorandum 
of Agreement: Pierce College (Athens, Greece) 
and the University of Massachusetts (Amherst)", 
(Doc. T74-039) through August 31, 1976 as set 
forth in Doc. T75-146. 

Mr. Lynton had next spoken, said Trustee Troy, on a pro- 
posal to continue the program known as the University Without 
Walls at UM/ Amherst (Doc. T75-147) . The program had been initially 
created for a period of three years with the understanding that it 
would be reviewed by the Faculty Senate. The review had taken 
place, and the Faculty Senate had voted a one-year extension for 
which it was now asking Board approval. A motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To extend the mandate of operation of the 
University Without Walls through June 1976 
as set forth in Doc. T75-147. 

Trustee Troy turned to a proposed New Appointment with 
Tenure at UM/Amhers t (Doc. T75-148) . Dr. Thomas Gold, said Trustee 
Troy, was a scientist of very great distinction in the field of 
astronomy and physics. A member of both the National Academy of 
Science and the Royal Society of Great Britain, Dr. Gold would 
join the University faculty in 1977 under the arrangement proposed. 
Trustee Troy moved the vote, which was seconded, and it was 



QQ 1 



5 



3-6-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Establishment of 
a Department of 
Sports Studies 
(Doc. T75-142) 



UM/Amherst — 
Terminal Extension 
of MBA Program 
in Greece 
(Doc. T75-146) 



UM/ Amherst — 
University With - 
out Walls 
(Doc. T75-147) 



UM/Amherst — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-148) 



3976 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Establishment of 
a Department of 
Communications 
Disorders in the 
School of Health 
Sciences 
(Doc. T75-141) 



Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

UM/Amherst — 

Delegation of 

Authority for 

Access to Mount 

Lincoln 

(Doc. T75-158) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointment of 
Dr. Thomas Gold as Professor of Physics and 
Astronomy with tenure at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in 
Doc. T75-148. 

Trustee Troy's last item was that of the proposed 
Establishment of the Department of Communications Disorders in 
the School of Health Sciences at UM/Amherst ( Doc. T75-141) . He 
described this as a transfer of an existing program which none- 
theless required Board approval since it involved the designation 
of a department. Trustee Troy moved the vote. 

Trustee Gordon raised the issue of excessive prolifera- 
tion of departments, and asked whether this program actually 
needed to be a full-fledged department. Acting Provost Alfange 
explained that the need to reorganize the School of Physical Edu- 
cation arose out of the necessity of abolishing the former dis- 
tinction between men's and women's physical education. The area 
of Sports Studies, which Trustee Gordon had specifically pointed 
to in his question, was composed of psychologists, sociologists, 
and historians whose concentration focused on the study of the 
major impact which athletics has had on the United States. 

In the case of Communications Disorders, now a part of 
the School of Communications, it was felt that the program did 
not fit well into a school primarily concerned with such things 
as mass communications. As to the question of why it was a 
department by itself, Mr. Alfange said that it was specialized 
enough to warrant separate status in the School of Health Sciences 

Trustee Gordon said he hoped that hard looks would be 
taken to ensure that a few faculty members would not too easily 
get together and form their own enclave. Trustee Troy said he 
believed the reorganization that Mr. Alfange had mentioned con- 
stituted such a hard look, and he said that he believed that "if 
you are going to have a School of Physical Education, you must 
have departments." 

The motion was seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Communications 
Disorders in the School of Health Sciences 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T75-141. 

Chairman Healey called upon Trustee Knowles to report 
for the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Knowles 
reported that the Committee had first discussed, at its meeting 
of June 24, a proposed Delegation of Authority for Access to 
Mount Lincoln (Doc. T75-158) . A motion was made and seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the Amherst cam- 
pus, in his discretion, or those designated by 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

him, to prepare the necessary instruments to auth- 
orize governmental agencies to enter upon the land 
of the University at Mount Lincoln in Hampshire 
County for the purpose of installing and main- 
taining receiving and/or transmitting electronic 
equipment; further, that the Treasurer of the 
University be empowered and authorized to exe- 
cute all instruments for and in behalf of the 
Trustees of the University in furtherance of 
these matters. 

The next order of business had been the Revised Motor 
Vehicle Regulations at UM/ Amherst (Doc. T75-155) . These changes 
were minor, said Trustee Knowles, and they included a reduction 
in penalty fees for some offenses and a greater control over 
parking lots. A motion was made, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the Motor Vehicle Rules and Regula- 
tions, UM/ Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-155. 

Mr. Littlefield had then reviewed the proposed purchase 
of the Marine Science Station at Hodgkins Cove (Doc. T75-157) . 
Treasurer Johnson had described the history of the acquisition of 
the station, and had explained that much legal work needed to be 
done before the purchase could be completed. After a motion, which 
was duly seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be em- 
powered to obtain an appraisal or appraisals 
and to purchase on behalf of the University 
the premises consisting of the land and 
buildings in Gloucester, Essex County, Massa- 
chusetts, and known as the Marine Station, 
Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester, Massachusetts. 
Said premises shall be purchased from the 
present owner, University of Massachusetts 
Foundation, Inc. The purchase price shall 
be the balance of the outstanding mortgage 
owed to the present mortgagee, the Union 
National Bank of Lowell, as of the date of 
taking title. 

The Treasurer shall be further authorized to 
take such further action as is necessary to 
complete the purchase. 

A related item of business having to do with the Marine 
Science Station was the Request to the Board of Trustees by the 
Gloucester Community Development Corporation for Permission to 
Use Part of the Marine Station, Gloucester, Property for Overflow 
Parking (Doc. T75-156) . A motion was made and seconded, and it was 



3977 



8-6-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Revised Motor 
Vehicle Regula- 
tions 
(Doc. T75-155) 



UM/Amherst — 
Marine Science 
Station at 
Hodgkins Cove 
(Doc. T75-157) 






UM/Amherst — 
Parking at 
Marine Science 
Station 
(Doc. T75-156) 



3 9 78 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
Parking Garage 



UM/Boston — 
S enema tic/ Pre- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the University of Massachusetts 
Foundation that permission be given to the Glou- 
cester Community Development Corporation to 
allow the parking of automobiles of those in 
attendance at alternate educational activities 
of the Corporation as given in Trustee Document 
T75-156 with the reservations recorded therein. 

Trustee Knowles next reported that there had been a long 
discussion of the parking garage proposal for UM/Worcester. Mr. 
George Pumphret, chairman of the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority, and presented the problems of financing the 
project. The Authority wished to ensure that the garage, once 
built, would be self-liquidating. The Committee had taken a vote, 
but to allow for a review of the wording of the vote and of current 
debt service projections, the vote would not be put before the 
Trustees at this time. 



The next item, said Trustee Knowles, had been discussion 
of Schematic/Preliminary Revised Drawings for Building 120 at 

liminary Revised UM/Boston (Doc. T75-159) . After a description of some of the de- 

Drawings for tails of the drawings, Trustee Knowles moved the vote taken by 

Building 120 the Committee. After a second, it was 

(Doc. T75-159) 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary plans for Building 

120 (Gymnasium) at University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston dated June 12, 1975 (Doc. T75-159) and 
authorize preparation of working drawings in- 
cluding contract documents required for the 
construction of the foundation and other nec- 
essary sitework for the project. This approval 
is based upon assurance by the Architect to 
the Bureau of Building Construction that the 
total construction cost of the building and 
associated outside landscaping and athletic 
facilities will be within the available funds 
of Eight Million Dollars ($8,000,000). 

Trustee Knowles then observed that a recent statement 
of the Kennedy Corporation eliminating the Amherst campus from 
consideration as a site for the Kennedy Library provided the 
opportunity for the Trustees to take a position on the matter. 
Accordingly the Committee had voted to support the President and 
the Chancellor in their negotiations with the Kennedy Corporation, 
A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To support President Wood and Chancellor Golino 
in their continuing efforts to bring the Kennedy 
Library complex to the UM/Boston Harbor Campus. 

The Committee had then heard informational reports on a 
variety of matters related to physical planning which were set 



Kennedy Library 



' 



I 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

forth in detail in the Committee minutes. The last item the Com- 
mittee had discussed was the matter of building names. Trustee 
Knowles concluded her report by asking that the Chancellors of 
UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston respond to the request of the Committee 
in September. 

Chairman Healey thanked Trustee Knowles, and asked her 
then to report to the Board in her capacity as delegate to the 
Board of Higher Education. Trustee Knowles reported that the BHE 
had established a permanent advisory committee, at its June 20 
meeting, to advise the Chancellor and the Board of proposed legis- 
lation relative to financing of private higher education. 

The Board had voted to grant Stage II program Approval 
to the University of Massachusetts at Boston, College IV, BA in 
Management. The Four-Year Academic Advisory Committee had reported 
that it had looked favorably upon "all aspects of this very care- 
fully documented Stage II proposal." 

The Board had also decided to table for one month the 
Collegiate Authority Committee's recommendations regarding the 
University's long-range plans and timetable for the implementation 
of new degree programs at both graduate and undergraduate levels 
for UM/Boston. 

Trustee Knowles reported that the BHE had met again on 
July 18, and had granted Stage II Program Approval for the proposed 
major degree in Environmental Sciences at UM/Amherst and the pro- 
posed major degree in Black Studies at UM/Boston. The BHE had 
decided that both long-range plans and implementation of proposals 
at UM/Boston, which had been tabled at the June meeting, would not 
be considered until September. 

The BHE had also instructed at this meeting that the re- 
port of the Budget and Capital Outlay Committee expressing concern 
over the maintenance budgets recommended by the Governor in House 1 
for the University and the BHE, as well as the attempt to politicize 
higher education by shifting the responsibility for educational 
policy-making to the Secretary of Educational Affairs, be presented 
at the Joint Education Committee hearings on July 21. 

The BHE had also appointed Dr. Leroy Keith, Associate 
Vice President for University Policy of the University, to the 
position of Interim Chancellor of Higher Education. 

Chairman Healey next introduced a matter requested by 
Trustee O'Keefe to be on the agenda. Trustee O'Keefe read for the 
record the following letter: 

Dear Sirs: 

We are General Counsel to the Bill of Rights 
Foundation. The Foundation has undertaken to pro- 
vide assistance to students at the Amherst campus 



3 9 79 



8-6-75 



Building Names 



Report of Dele- 
gate to Board 
of Higher 
Education 



UM/Amherst — 
Legal Services 
Office 



3 9 80 



8-6-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

who are seeking authority for the student attorneys 
to represent students in civil litigation with the 
University and students who may be accused of crimes. - 

We received a copy of Mr. Searson's memo to you, 
dated July 7, 1975, concerning this topic. The pur- 
pose of this letter is not to argue with Mr. Searson's 
legal conclusions, although we disagree with many of 
them. The purpose of this letter is to call to your 
attention what appears to be a mistaken assumption 
underlying Mr. Searson's position. That assumption 
is that the student attorneys are paid with Univer- 
sity money. In reality, the attorneys are paid with 
students' money, derived from a tax which the stu- 
dents impose upon themselves through a duly con- 
stituted student government. We hope you will agree 
that this fact - apparently over-looked by Mr. Searson 
- entitles the students to much greater deference in 
prescribing the range of legal services than if the 
funds came from taxpayers' pockets. 

Thank you for your consideration. 

Very truly yours, 

Herbert Jordan 

After reading the letter, Trustee O'Keefe 

MOVED : That the Legal Services Office not be precluded 
from representing students in criminal matters 
or suing the University. 

The motion was seconded. Trustee O'Keefe asked Mr. 
Michael Parkhurst, head of Legal Services, to address the Board. 
Mr. Parkhurst said that this matter had been unresolved for nearly 
a year, and that any delay would be an abuse of the students' good 
faith efforts to resolve the issue. Trustee Eddy asked whether 
this matter had been received by the appropriate Committee of the 
Board, and Secretary Hardy explained that it had been proposed as 
a motion at the joint June meeting of the Committees on Budget 
and Finance. It had first been raised before the Committee on 
Student Affairs, but no action had been taken at that meeting 
pending a legal opinion from Counsel Searson. 

Trustee Carlson suggested that, since the matter had 
not been substantively reviewed by the Committee on Student Affairs 
before being brought to the Board, and since the legal questions 
had now been resolved, that the matter go back to the Committee on 
Student Affairs before the Board be asked to vote on it. Trustee 
O'Keefe indicated that this course would be acceptable, and 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey suggested that a special meeting of the Committee 
on Student Affairs be scheduled for sometime before the September 
Board meeting, so that the recommendation of the Committee on 
Student Affairs could be placed on the agenda of the next Board 
meeting. No vote was taken on Trustee O'Keefe's motion. 

The next item of business was the proposed authorization 
of the Treasurer to use the University Seal. At the Chairman's 
request, President Wood explained that this authorization grew 
out of the closing of the Office of Liaison Service, which had 
been previously authorized to use the seal. Accordingly it was 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
keep and employ an official University seal as 
required from time to time for the certification 
of Federal grant applications and other documents 
of a routine nature which do not require personal 
certification by the President or the Secretary 
of the University. 

Chairman Healey next recognized Professor Wilkinson to 
make a statement. Professor Wilkinson stated that his remarks 
were in behalf of both the Rules Committee of the Faculty Senate 
at UM/ Amherst and the Steering Committee of the Assembly of UM/ 
Boston. He wished to preface his remarks, he said, with an ex- 
pression of appreciation for the President's statement earlier in 
the meeting that he would take steps to ensure the fullest dis- 
semination of information on the campuses with regard to the imple- 
mentation of the Hay Report. He expressed the concern, however, 
that the basic decision to implement the Hay Report had already 
been made. He said that the faculties disagreed thoroughly with 
the President's statement that the Hay Report did not have implica- 
tions for governance. 



At this time, Professor Wilkinson read the following 



statement : 



"The Rules Committee of the UMass/Amherst Faculty 
Senate and the Steering Committee of the UMass/ 
Boston Assembly wish to note that the Hay Asso- 
ciates study raises very major issues, the res- 
olution of which can be critical for the structure 
and functioning of the entire University, and 
accordingly urge the President and the Board of 
Trustees to allow campus governance units a 
reasonable opportunity (as provided in the Gov- 
ernance Document) to formulate and express their 
views on these issues before any further action 
on the study's recommendations is placed on the 
agenda of the Board or of its Committees." 



3981 



8-6-75 



Authorization 
of the Treasurer 
to Use the Univer- 
sity Seal 



Faculty Statement 
on Hay Report 



3982 



8-6-75 

UM/ Amherst — 
Statement of Stu- 
dents on Univer- 
sity Budget 

TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next recognized Trustee O'Keefe, who 
called upon Ms. Annette Guttenberg to make a statement with 
respect to the University Budget. Her statement expressed student 
opposition to any cut in the budget and any increase in the tui- 
tion. She reported that a liaison committee had been created, 
composed of students from all segments of public higher education, 
to resist political and economic pressure on students. Students, 
she said, are the group most affected by decisions made by Trustees, 
and she said they will not stand passively by and see their edu- 
cations weakened and their lives diminished. 



There was no further business after this statement , 
the Chairman declared the meeting adjourned at 6:00 p.m. 



and 



r 




GladyJ Keith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



1 



\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 3, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 
Campus Center, Room 1009 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trust- 
ees Abrams, Carlson, Croce, Eddy, Dennis, O'Keefe, Morgenthau, 
Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Shaler, Snowden, Troy, Weldon; 
Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Trea- 
surer Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Ms. Judd and Ms. 
Rasmussen, Office of the Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Father 
Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President; Mr. White, Assistant 
to the President; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant for Student Affairs; 
Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant for Budget Office 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget 
Director; Mr. Melley, Director of Public Affairs; Professor Wilkin- 
son, Faculty Representative; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Representa- 
tive 

UM/ Bos ton : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Provost; Pro- 
fessor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher 



The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees present and 
acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. 
The minutes of the previous meeting were presented. Upon a motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
August 6, 1975. 

Chairman Healey began the meeting by welcoming the two 
new Trustees, Mr. Daniel Dennis and Professor Ruth Morgenthau. 
Both expressed their pleasure at joining the Board. The Chairman 
then asked the Secretary to prepare an appropriate resolution 
and invite both Mr. Haigis and Mrs. Knowles, the two outgoing 
Trustees, to the October meeting of the Board in order to express 
in a formal way the appreciation of the Board for their many years 
of service to the University. 

The Chairman next asked for and received the concurrence 
of the Board in the appointment of Trustee Spiller as Chairman of 



39, 



O 



Approval of 
Minutes of Pre- 
vious Meeting 



New Trustees 
Welcomed 



3984 



9-3-75 

Appointments of 
Trustees Spiller 
and Troy 

TRUSTEE 

President ' s 
Remarks 

University Budget 



Tuition 



Resignation of 
Vice President 
Edelman 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and Trustee Troy as Dele- 
gate to the Board of Higher Education. Following these remarks 
the Chairman called upon the President for his report. 

President Wood opened his agenda with the subject of the 
University budget. He reminded the Trustees that the University 
was operating on a month-by-month interim budget and the capacity 
of the University to continue operation during this time turns on 
the early resolution of the request for critical need expenditures 
and positions. He described it as one of the more difficult issues 
that the University has faced. He said he would be speaking to 
the faculty about the situation in a meeting with the Amherst campus 
Faculty Senate on September 4. Second, President Wood observed 
that the Board has begun active consideration of the issue of 
tuition for each of the campuses. He said he would provide the 
Board with factual and empirical material on the basis of which 
he would make a recommendation as quickly as possible. 

President Wood expressed regret at the departure of Peter 
Edelman, Vice President for University Policy, to assume the posi- 
tion of Director of Youth Affairs for the State of New York. He 
commended Mr. Edelman for his important services to the University 
and wished him luck in his new post. 

President Wood next mentioned the hope that there would 
soon be resolution of the issue of funding for the University hos- 
pital. He said he would bring before the Board, by procedure 
determined by the Executive Committee, the conclusions of the 
Search Committee and the recommendation for the new Dean/Chancellor 
of UM/Worcester soon after the budget problems are resolved. The 
President then called on Chancellor Bromery of the Amherst campus. 

Chancellor Bromery informed the Trustees that classes for 
the fall semester had begun with an enrollment of 23,350 FTE, the 
number planned and budgeted for under the original budget request 
of $118 million approved by the Trustees. This had caused some 
difficulties, he said, but the campus was doing its best to reduce 
the inconvenience this had caused to students. He also reported 
that the student government and the faculty had cooperated with 
the administration over the summer in examining budget information 
in an effort to make budget decisions. He added the hope that this 
cooperation would continue. 

Chancellor Bromery told the Board that the administration 
had had an exit interview with the internal auditors of the School 
of Education. He reported that all the changes recommended by the 
auditors had been made or would soon be made, and that some had 
been made as a result of recommendations of the Treasurer's 
internal audit staff some time earlier. 

Chairman Healey next called upon Chancellor Golino of 
the Boston campus. Chancellor Golino reported on the opening of 
the new College of Professional Studies. A convocation was to be 



I 



[I 



I 



1 



TRUSTEE 



\ 



[ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

held by the faculty and Dean of the College to celebrate the open- 
ing, he said, and the Trustees had been invited. Trustee Carlson 
was to be the keynote speaker at this convocation, he said. 

He also reported that the Harbor Campus had opened and 
that it was experiencing some of the same difficulties as the 
Amherst campus. He said that 2400 new students had been admitted 
at the freshmen and other levels from a pool of 8400 applicants, 
the largest that the Boston campus has ever had. He added that if 
the campus knew what it could rely on for a budget, it could under- 
take the kind of rational planning necessary. 

Chairman Healey next called on Acting Dean Butcher, who 
reported the appearance for the first time of a full class of 100 
students, bringing the total enrollment to 230. He also alluded 
to the difficulty of program planning without an annual budget. 

Turning to the reports of the standing committees, the 
Chairman reported for the Executive Committee. The only matter to 
be voted upon by the Committee had been a proposal to authorize 
the Chancellor of the Boston campus to negotiate and execute an 
agreement for the leasing of floors three through eight of 100 
Arlington Street to the Boston School Department as the temporary 
home for Madison Park High School. Seven hundred students would 
be housed in the building, while the balance of the fifteen hundred 
would be housed at the Sawyer Building on Columbus Avenue. 

Trustee Snowden remarked that this was an important move 
in contributing to the fulfillment of that part of the court order 
to the Boston schools requiring the schools to mount innovative 
and creative education. She said she was happy about this action. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University of 

Massachusetts at Boston, or his designee, to nego- 
tiate an agreement with the City of Boston, or its 
designee, whereby for a period of time not extending 
beyond June 30, 1976, the third, fourth, fifth, 
sixth, seventh, and eighth floors of the Univer- 
sity's facility at 100 Arlington Street, Boston 
may be occupied and utilized by the temporary 
Madison Park High School for the education of 
approximately seven hundred students in return 
for a payment for expenses attributable to the 
City of Boston's use of said facility. Further, 
that the Chancellor of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston, after consultation with the 
President, be empowered and authorized to exe- 
cute an agreement on behalf of the University 
upon successful completion of said negotiations. 



3985 



9-3-75 



UM/Worcester — 
Acting Dean's 
Remarks 



Executive 
Committee 

Lease of 100 
Arlington Street 
to Boston 
Schools 



3986 



9-3-75 

Committee on 
Finance 



TRUSTEE 

Investment 
Portfolio 



General Liability 
and Malpractice 
Insurance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman next called on Trustee Robertson to report 
for Chairman Gordon on the Committee on Finance. Mr. Robertson's 
first item was the matter of the University's investment policy. 
Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood and his associate, Mr. 
John Wilkins, had discussed the University's investment policy 
and proposed some investment guidelines, which the members of 
the Committee accepted. It had been the feeling at the meeting 
that the Committee should review the University's investment 
guidelines annually. 

Mr. Robertson turned next to General Liability Insurance. 
Mr. Joseph Albert, the University's insurance consultant, had 
reported on progress made in securing malpractice insurance for 
UM/Worcester personnel other than physicians, as well as on the 
subject of general liability insurance. It had been the sense of 
the Committee, he said, that malpractice insurance must be obtained 
by the time the hospital opens in December, and in view of the 
fact that outpatient clinics were open at present, it was felt 
that such insurance is needed immediately for employees involved 
in those activities. 

Trustee Abrams asked whether personnel in public health 
hospitals in the Commonwealth were insured for malpractice. He 
was informed by Treasurer Johnson that they were not covered and 
that they rely instead on the sovereign immunity of the Common- 
wealth. Acting Dean Butcher stated that the hospital was in a 
different position from other public institutions of the Common- 
wealth, and said the Medical School had already had difficulty 
placing students in hospitals because they did not have malpractice 
coverage. Mr. Searson explained that state institutions as such 
could be protected under the doctrine of sovereign immunity, but 
that individuals may not be. Furthermore, he said, the Supreme 
Judicial Court had indicated its intent to abolish sovereign 
immunity as an absolute defense. There was no further discussion, 
and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the insurance premiums for the General 
Liability Insurance coverage already autho- 
rized be paid after approval of the terms of 
the policy by the Office of the General Counsel. 

Trustee Robertson reported next on a proposed Addition 
to University of Massachusetts Teaching Hospital Proposed Rate 
Book, Cardiovascular Medicine (Doc. T76-001) . A motion was made 



UM/Worcester — 

University of 

Massachusetts 

Teaching Hospital and seconded, and it was 

Proposed Rate 

VOTED 



Book , Cardiovas- 
cular Medicine 
(Doc. T76-001) 



To approve the physician's fees and hospital 
charges as set forth in Doc. T76-001 and to 
incorporate same in Doc. T75-050A, said 
amended document to be redesignated Doc. 
T75-050B. 



\ 



TRUSTEE 



398? 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Robertson proceeded to a proposed Authorization 
of UM/Boston to Negotiate with Northeastern University. He said 
that this negotiation would result in an agreement whereby stu- 
dents enrolled at UM/Boston could take courses at Northeastern 
University at substantially less expense to the University than 
would be the case were the University to offer these courses it- 
self. President Wood commended Chancellor Golino for his efforts 
in bringing about the possibility of this agreement, and commented 
that it was the first time in his five years as President that a 
private institution had accepted his standing offer for such inter- 
institutional cooperation. Chancellor Golino expressed his satis- 
faction over the proposal, and said it proves that UM/Boston can 
offer a diverse program of study in cooperation, not competition, 
with private institutions. A motion was made and seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston in consultation with 
the President's Office to commence the negotia- 
tion of contractual relationships with Northeast- 
ern University whereby students enrolled in the 
Management Program in the College of Professional 
Studies at UMass/Boston will be entitled to enroll 
in courses offered by the College of Business 
Administration at Northeastern University. Fur- 
ther, that this authorization be subject to the 
following conditions: 

(1) The program shall be limited to advanced 
elective courses not offered by UMass/Boston and 
to eligible students; 

(2) The contractual amount to be paid by the 
University to Northeastern for each course enroll- 
ment shall not exceed the respective credit hour 
cost paid by a full-time day student in the under- 
graduate program in the College of Business Adminis- 
tration, of Northeastern University, as shall be 
specified in the contract; 

(3) The experimental program established by 
the aforesaid contracts shall be for a period not 
to exceed three years and not to commence prior 
to the fall semester of 1976. The program will 
be independently evaluated by each institution 

at the conclusion of the stated period. 

(4) All contracts shall be subject to the 
availability of funds; a minimum level of $20,000 
and not to exceed $40,000 shall be included in the 
University's Fiscal Year 1977 Budget request to 
fund the operation of the program during the 1976- 
197 7 academic year. 



9-3-75 

UM/Boston — 
Negotiations with 
Northeastern Uni- 
versity 



3988 



9-3-75 



TRUSTEE 

UM/ Amherst — 

Horseback Riding 

Trust Fund and 

Fee 

(Doc. T76-002) 



UM/Amherst — 
Graduate Program 
Fee 



UM/Amherst — 
Audits, Reports 
on School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(5) All contracts shall be subject to re- 
view by the General Counsel to the University, 
and approval by the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Robertson reported next on a proposal to establish 
a Horseback Riding Trust Fund and Fee at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-002) , 
This was a voluntary fee for those students who wished to make use 
of this recreational activity at the Amherst campus. After motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That a voluntary thirty dollar ($30) per semester 
fee be established for students participating in 
the horseback riding program at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-002; further, that said fees shall 
be deposited in the Horseback Riding Trust Fund. 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish in accordance with University policy 
a Horseback Riding Trust Fund at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst for the deposit of 
fees collected from students participating in 
the horseback riding program; further, that 
expenditures from said trust fund shall be for 
the purposes set forth in Trustee Document 
T76-002. 

The next item on the Finance Committee agenda had been 
a proposal to raise the Graduate Program Fee at UM/Amherst from 
$10 to $50. Trustee O'Keefe asked why, when classes were being 
canceled and teaching assistants laid off, it was necessary to 
raise this fee. At the President's request, Mr. Alfange explained 
that this fee was not paid by active graduate students but by 
those who maintain their enrollment without actively pursuing 
their studies. He added that its purpose is not to acquire 
revenue but to encourage such students to complete their studies 
instead of just occupying a space. Ms. Stack observed that this 
matter had not been considered by the Graduate Student Senate and 
said she believed the recent reduction of the time limit on the 
doctoral degree from nine to six years and the master degree limit 
from six to four years should have been an adequate measure to 
discourage such delays. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That effective January 1, 1976, the Graduate 
Program Fee, UM/Amherst, be and hereby is 
established at a rate of $50 per semester. 

Trustee O'Keefe cast a negative vote. 

Trustee Robertson turned next to the Audits and Reports 
on the School of Education, UM/Amherst. He said that the account- 
ing firm of Coopers & Lybrand had made a presentation on Phases I 
and II of the outside audit, and a presentation had also been made 



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TRUSTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 9-3-75 

on the audit made by the Treasurer's Office. All this material 
had been made available to the Legislative, Executive and judicial 
branches of State Government, as well as to the press following 
the meeting. The President had remarked that the work had been 
made more difficult because of restrictions on pertinent data by 
law enforcement agencies. The studies had shown that there had 
been some misuse of funds, but much less than suggested by some 
press reports. Even small misuse, said Trustee Robertson, was of 
course unacceptable, and changes in the system of controls of 
grants and contracts had been implemented. 

Trustee Robertson said that Coopers & Lybrand had reported 
that an ends-justif ies-the-means attitude had apparently prevailed 
at the School of Education whereby generally worthy goals had been 
sought by questionable, if not illegal, methods. Phase I of the 
audit had pointed up the great need for a Vice President for Manage- 
ment, at the system level, and a Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance at the campus level. Chairman Gordon had stressed at 
the meeting, said Trustee Robertson, that these audits were only 
the beginning, not the end, and that the Finance Committee would 
continue to exercise their stewardship role in the financial health 
of the institution. 

President Wood spoke briefly on the School of Education, 
pointing out what serious damage can be done to a public univer- 
sity by even a small case of wrong-doing, misfeasance or mal- 
feasance. The attention accorded these activities at the School 
of Education is unfortunate and he said he believed that the Uni- 
versity as a whole had suffered. He added that he had asked the 
campuses to review the audits and provide comments on the reports. 
He said that further evaluation and recommendations for actions 
would be made to the Trustees. Finally, he said the University 
must preserve the academic nature of the enterprise, and that he 
was conscious of the need for completely unfettered scholarly 
inquiry and the need for flexible use of funds, while organiza- 
tional, administrative and management changes move forward. He 
emphasized that such changes would occur in the proper academic 
context. 

As he had stated earlier, Chancellor Bromery reported 
that he had completed the exit interview with the internal auditors 
from the Treasurer's office. He reported that the recommendations 
contained in those audit reports had been implemented and that the 
campus administration would continue to carry out administrative 
and procedural changes, so that a recurrence of the School of 
Education situation would be unlikely in the future. 

Turning to the Ohio Land Sale, Trustee Robertson reported Ohio Land Sale 
that the Committee had met in executive session to discuss some 
of the details of a proposed extension of time for the sale to 
March 1976. 

He moved the vote before the Board, which was seconded and 



3990 



9-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



Committee on Fac- 
ulty and Educa- 
tional Policy 

UM/Amherst , 
UM/Boston — 
Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T76-003, 
T76-004, T76-005) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Treasurer of the University be autho- 
rized to confirm an extension of time to March 
13, 1976 for the buyer to fulfill the contin- 
gencies set forth in Real Estate Purchase 
Agreement, dated August 13, 1973, between the 
Board of Trustees and Nationwide Development 
Company (Trustee Doc. T75-085) and to execute 
in the name of and on behalf of the Trustees 
a deed or deeds in accordance with said agree- 
ment, or as said agreement may be modified after 
further negotiations by the Treasurer and 
Nationwide Development Company, after consulta- 
tion with General Counsel; provided, however, 
that should the sale of Parcel II be deferred, 
the purchase price for Parcel I shall be not 
less than $462,000, and the purchase price for 
Parcel II shall be the balance of the total pur- 
chase price of $1,000,000. 

The next committee report was that of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy, made by Chairman Troy. A meeting 
had been held that morning, said Mr. Troy, to discuss several 
Appointments with Tenure at UM/Amherst and UM/Boston (Docs. T76-003, 



T76-004, T76-005) . Trustee Troy described the credentials of each 
of the individuals in some detail, and asked that the Trustees concur 
with the President's appointments. Trustee O'Keefe asked whether, 
with the possibility of a faculty cutback, a freeze on tenure might 
be desirable. He also asked for comparative figures on the per- 
centage of tenured faculty at the University and other institutions 
across the country. Vice President Lynton said it was difficult 
to give such figures accurately at such short notice, but estimated 
that the average at UM/Amherst was 60 percent and at UM/Boston 
50 percent. The national average, he continued, was probably about 
60 to 70 percent. As for a freeze on tenure, Mr. Lynton indicated 
that such an action would be tantamount to abrogating tenure and 
would prevent qualified younger faculty members from acquiring per- 
manent employment. He said he would be opposed to such a serious 
action. Trustee Troy added his conviction that the University was 
very much in line with the national average in such matters. He 
moved the three votes, which were seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointment of 
Dr. Lawrence Foster as Associate Professor of 
Philosophy with tenure at the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston, as set forth in Doc. 
T76-003. 

VOTED : To concur with the President's appointment of 
Dr. Paul S. Rosenkrantz as Professor of Human 
Growth and Development with tenure at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Boston, as set forth 
in Doc. T76-004. 



f 



I 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To concur with the President's appointment of 

Dr. Sidney Schoeffler as Professor of Marketing 
with tenure at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T76-005. 

Chairman Healey next called upon Trustee Shaler, Chairman 
of the Committee on Student Affairs, to report for his committee. 
Trustee Shaler reported that the Committee had met that morning to 
discuss a student proposal that the Legal Services Office at UM/ 
Amherst not be precluded from representing students in criminal 
matters or in suits against the University. He recalled that this 
matter had been brought up originally at a meeting of the Committee 
in the early spring, but that no action had been taken on the matter 
because Counsel Searson had raised legal questions. Counsel Searson 
had since written a legal opinion, which he had sent to the Board, 
which said that the University was not obliged to provide such serv- 
ices, but could if it so chose. 

Trustee Shaler reported that the students had sent him an 
excellent memorandum on the subject at his summer home and had asked 
that he distribute it to the rest of the Committee. Unfortunately, 
he said, he had not the capacity to duplicate and distribute this 
item from his summer home. For this reason, he said, other members 
of the Committee had not had an opportunity to read the document 
and as a result felt insufficiently informed to act on the item. 
The issue of expanding the activities of the Legal Services Office 
therefore had been tabled for further discussion at the Committee's 
September meeting. 

Chairman Healey remarked that he believed the full Board 
should vote on this matter at the October meeting whether or not 
the Committee on Student Affairs recommended favorably. He said 
this was clearly a matter of great concern to the students and said 
they were entitled to a definitive answer by the Trustees. 

There was no further business to come before the Trustees, 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



UEladyJ* Keith Hardy * 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



3991 



9-3-75 



Committee on 
Student Affairs 

UM/ Amherst — 
Legal Services 
Office 



3992 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



University 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 11, 1975; 5:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trus- 
tees Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Dukakis, Eddy, Fielding, Morgen- 
thau, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Shaler, Snowden, Spiller, 
Troy, Weldon, Winthrop; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, Assistant Secretary; 
Ms. Judd and Ms. Rasmussen, Office of the Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Gartenberg, Budget Director; Ms. Gill, Staff Assistant, Institute 
for Labor Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. 
Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; 
Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the 
President; Mr. White, Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Professor Wilkinson 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Freeland, Dean of College IV; Mr. 
Larner, Director of Public Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Cathey, Controller 

Guests : Mr. Parks, Secretary of Educational Affairs; Mrs. Bluestone 
of the Department of Public Health 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees present 
and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 5:05 p.m. 
Chairman Healey explained that this was a special meeting to discuss 
issues relating to the University budget, and stated that no other 
matters were properly before the Board. He then called on the Presi 
dent . 



President Wood informed the Board that he had asked for the 
special meeting to consider six votes which would authorize the Pres- 
ident to take actions designed to keep the University in operation 
during the period of the Interim Budget for September and October. 
He said the University's efforts were now focused almost entirely on 
meeting payroll obligations so as to keep from closing classes and 
dormitories. He said that every other account in the University 
would suffer, and that the necessity for the vote came about in the 
context of a rapidly changing legislative and administrative situation 



I 



TRUSTEE 



3993 



I 



r 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The proposals, said the President, were short-term measures 

— They would be separate from consideration of the full 
FY 1976 Budget which would hopefully receive action 
in the House this month and in the Senate next month. 

— They would not relieve the University of the threat 
to development and program inherent in the proposed 
Executive Budget recommendation about which he had 
testified before the House Committee on Ways and 
Means on August 6. 

— They would allow the meeting of the University pay- 
roll in the month of September and, if critical needs 
are met, would allow the University to remain in opera- 
tion during the month of October or until a Budget is 
enacted. 

President Wood then described the following circumstances: 

— On the basis of present allotments, he said, the 
three campuses would run out of money in the per- 
sonnel account on September 18, 1975. 

— The shortfall in payroll was $1.6 million from 
September 18 through September 30. 

The President described four possible solutions: 

1. A request for advance authorization of the October 
allotments, as was done in August for the September 
allotments. If this were approved, the immediate 
cash problem would be postponed. 



The University's request for critical needs, pend- 
ing before the Secretary of Administration and Fi- 
nance, would provide $1.5 million of the total re- 
quired. Legislation enacted by the Legislature, 
and signed that day by the Governor, authorized 
the Trustees to submit the request directly to 
the House and Senate Ways and Means Committees. 
The balance of the shortfall could be covered by 
a transfer of $100,000 from accounts 03 through 16. 

If the critical needs requests were not approved 
by September 18, the entire shortfall of $1.6 
million could be met by transferring all the sums 
in the subsidiary accounts. This could cut off 
laboratory supplies needed in the fall semester 
and would threaten student jobs. 



9-11-75 



3994 



9-11-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4. The Trustees could authorize the University to 
suspend temporarily, for the faculty and pro- 
fessional staff, the long-established practice 
of paying salaries on a weekly basis and pay 
instead once every two weeks. This would make 
October 3 the next payday after September 19. 
General Counsel was of the opinion, said Pre- 
sident Wood, that the Trustees had the statu- 
tory authority to make this change. 

The President reported that the votes before the Board 
provided for the implementation of the options as contingencies 
may require, on the understanding that the Board would be kept 
constantly informed. He stated that these arrangements would 
allow the University to continue its academic activities, although 
under severe pressure. Classes would meet, laboratories and the 
agricultural research and extension services would remain open 
(although on a curtailed basis) and contractual obligations would 
be barely met. He said the votes would provide only temporary 
relief, and added that the final answers could be found only when 
the full Budget is enacted. 

The President next described the proposed votes in 
greater detail. With respect to the sixth vote, which would autho- 
rize the President to initiate legal action if necessary to sustain 
the fiscal authority of the University, the purpose of the proposed 
vote was to permit recourse if the state departments delay or 
fail to honor the necessary transfers. As to the measures as a 
whole, he said he did not contemplate any other alternatives con- 
sistent with the proper management of the University. 

Secretary Parks suggested that the first vote, authorizing 
the President to certify the existence of critical needs, might be 
properly amended to provide for review by the Budget Committee of 
the Board during the process, rather than after the fact. 

The Chairman called upon Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the 
Budget Committee, who said the suggestion was a good one, but said 
that the Budget and Finance Committees had been intimately involved 
with the preparation of the various modifications before the 
Trustees. He said further that he was in frequent touch with the 
President by telephone, and was confident that the Budget Committee 
would keep fully on top of the rapidly changing situation through 
Mr. Gartenberg, and that a formal vote to that effect was probably 
not necessary. 

Chairman Healey pointed out that the statute enacted by 
the Legislature provided that critical needs could be certified 
by the Board or by an officer designated by it, and he explained 
that it had been at his insistence that the reporting process be 
a part of any such delegation of authority. Secretary Parks 
commented that he believed the appropriate committee of the Board 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ought to function in the way he suggested. Chairman Healey said 
that this amendment to the first vote would acceptable to him. 

Governor Dukakis asked that the budget officers of the 
three campuses comment further on the critical need positions of 
their campuses. If these needs were not met, he asked, what would 
be the consequences? President Wood commented that the list before 
the Trustees was primarily an academic critical needs list. He 
explained that the identification of academic needs takes place in 
the spring, before the budget request is approved. The needs are 
reviewed first by the Chancellor and then by the President. There 
had been a position freeze in effect in the University since 
December — throughout the period during which needs were reviewed — 
to which exceptions could be made only by the Chancellor, and later 
only by the President. The present list of critical needs, he said, 
is in the context of a vacancy rate of more than ten percent for 
the University. 

Governor Dukakis asked what would happen if the vacant 
positions were not filled. Speaking for the Amherst campus, Chan- 
cellor Bromery said that individuals hired to fill vacancies on the 
list had already signed contracts and had moved their families to 
Amherst. He said that it would be possible to win a court case if 
the contracts were to be abrogated on the grounds of unavailability 
of funds, but that such an act would so seriously damage the Univer- 
sity's reputation that it would be difficult to recruit in the 
future. President Wood added that the impact of such an action on 
the University's reputation would be comparable to that suffered 
by the University of California at Berkeley in 1964, for different 
reasons. The fact that the University was not in national compe- 
tition, he said, was an important factor. 

Secretary Parks asked if it would be possible to tighten 
up the list in any way. Would it hurt, he said, to knock off, say, 
one of the assistant professors on the list without having a 
critical impact? Chancellor Bromery observed that the Amherst cam- 
pus had accrued about 260 vacancies. Even if the 83 critical 
positions were to be filled, he said, the campus would still be 
122 persons shorter than last year with several hundred more stu- 
dents. He pointed out that the critical need figure of 83 positions 
was not the recommendation of the departments. A much higher list 
had been submitted to the Chancellor, and had been pared down 
considerably. Finally, each position had to be justified to the 
President . 

The President commented that the original list had been 
based upon the judgment of the academic departments, and had been 
screened carefully. Every reduction in the list, he said, contra- 
dicts their judgment. 

Chancellor Bromery said, in answer to the Governor's ques- 
tion about the educational impact on not meeting the needs, that 



3995 



9-11-75 



3996 



9-11-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at present 5,000 students were unable to get a complete schedule, 
that is, there were more students enrolled than there were adequate 
staff to teach them. The approval of the critical needs funds 
would relieve some of the crowding in some sections, but would not 
solve the problems of the 5,000. If the University did not receive 
its critical needs, it would be hard pressed to find the manpower 
to give these students a full schedule. 

Chancellor Golino spoke about the problems of the Boston 
campus. He said that 30 faculty positions had been held vacant 
and 60 sections had been kept closed. If the campus did not get 
the critical needs funds, it would be necessary to close 160 sec- 
tions and deny 3,000 students places in classes they had sought. 
Among the professional persons on the critical needs list, said 
Chancellor Golino, were several extremely important positions. 
One was the registrar, one was the affirmative action officer, and 
several were vacancies caused by the allotment of individuals to 
the Institute for Learning and Teaching so that it could assist in 
the desegregation of the Boston schools. If the critical needs 
funds to fill these positions were denied, he said, what morale 
is left on the Boston campus would be destroyed. He stressed that 
a University does not function by payroll and budgets alone, but 
that morale is a vitally necessary factor. 

Acting Dean Butcher of the Worcester campus spoke on the 
needs of the Medical School and hospital. He said there were 150 
vacant positions of 482 authorized, and this with 100 new students 
on the campus, which brings the total enrollment to 233. 

Governor Dukakis said he would vote against the proposed 
vote authorizing the President to take legal action, although he 
would vote for the other proposed votes. He said that he was con- 
cerned that the attitude of the Board was not consistent with the 
responses which he had been getting from the Board of Trustees 
of state colleges which, he said, did think they could live within 
a budget of 90 percent of last year's. We are in a difficult per- 
iod, he said, and the Commonwealth's fiscal deficit is still huge, 
in spite of painful cuts in human services. He said he appreciated 
the problems of the campuses as described by the Chancellors and 
the Acting Dean, but said that in his view they paled in comparison 
to the situation of the state mental hospitals. 

The Governor said he had signed legislation that day 
which would make it easier for the University to function, and he 
said he hoped there would be a full budget soon. But he said he 
believed that the initiation of legal action was not consistent 
with the kind of collective effort which all parts of state gov- 
ernment must make to cope with a deficit of $700 million. He 
expressed the hope that his administration could work with the 
Board of Trustees as it had with other Boards of Trustees, and 
added that he thought that legal action would alienate the Legis- 
lative as well as the Executive branch. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey said he would be happy on behalf of the 
Board to withdraw the proposed vote on legal action, and joined with 
the Governor in the hope that the Board could work with the adminis- 
tration. He said the Board was fully aware of the difficulty of 
his position. In 16 years on the Board, said Chairman Healey, he 
could not remember its taking a tougher stand on keeping the Uni- 
versity's budget down. He reminded the Governor that the budget 
request which had come from the campus departments had been $130 
million, but that the University's request to the Legislature 
had been cut to $103 million. The Trustees, he said, were anxious 
to balance the needs of the Governor and the Commonwealth with their 
responsibility to safeguard the welfare of the University. He said 
that he had seen the University move to the top rank nationally 
in a few years, and stressed that there was much at stake. 

President Wood said he wished to clarify that the proposed 
vote to authorize him to take legal action had not been designed to 
complicate the Governor's problems. But, he said, there exists in 
state government major offices with important ministerial functions. 
These functions, he said, were sometimes interpreted by incumbents 
of the offices as conferring administrative discretion not allowed 
by law. He would not object to dispensing with the proposed vote, 
but warned the Board that administrative actions taken or not taken 
on the ministerial level might complicate the University's capacity 
to operate through the interim budget period. 

Chairman Healey remarked that if the President should get 
a negative response, the Board could then reconsider its alternative 
but he agreed with the Governor that the Trustees ought not to 
anticipate an unfavorable response. The President said he would 
stand prepared for specific circumstances. There was no further 
discussion and a motion was made, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the President, with the approval of 
the Budget Committee of the Board of Trustees, to 
certify the existence of critical needs resulting 
from budgetary restrictions in the name of and 
on behalf of the Board of Trustees, and to take 
any other action relative thereto as he may deem 
necessary; further, to direct that the President 
report to the Board of Trustees any action taken 
hereunder. 

VOTED : To ratify the actions of the President on behalf 
of the University in effecting allotments and 
transfers between and among subsidiary accounts. 

VOTED : To ratify the action of the President on behalf 

of the University in submitting to the Commissioner 
of Administration the critical needs vacancies, 
pursuant to Chapter 530 of the Acts of 1975. 



399? 



9-11-75 



3998 



9-11-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the President to transfer into 
the personnel subsidiary accounts whatever 
funds he deems necessary from the other sub- 
sidiary accounts of the University in order 
to meet payroll requirements, and to take any 
other action relative thereto as he may deem 
necessary; further, to direct that the Pre- 
sident report to the Board of Trustees any 
action taken hereunder. 

VOTED : To authorize the President of the University 
during the interim budget period to take any 
necessary action to consolidate University 
payroll periods in order to meet temporary 
cash flow problems. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 5:40 p.m. 



CGladysOKeith Hardy fl 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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"Wmk* UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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&M v AMHERST . BOSTON • WORCESTER 

•i863- 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 11, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees. 



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Signature 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 11, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees. 




Signature 



r 



i 







UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 

ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 11, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees. 






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Signature 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 11, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees. 



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Signature 



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f UA S 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 11, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees. 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 






OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 12, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts held on September 11, 
1975, at Boston, Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 4(a) of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 1, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 
Faculty Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trust- 



3999 



ees Abrams, Breyer, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Dukakis, Eddy, 
Morgenthau, O'Keefe, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Shearer, 
Snowden, Spiller, Troy, and Weldon; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Secre- 
tary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel , Assistant Secretary; 
Ms. Judd and Ms. Rasmussen, Office of the Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Not Present: Trustees Anrig, Fielding, Gordon, Okin, Shaler, Winthr^p 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Bench, 
Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analyti- 
cal Studies; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, Assistant to the President; 
Ms. Crosson, Staff Associate for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Mr. Forsyth, Assistant to the Chancellor; Mr. 
Melley, Director of Public Affairs; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Broderick, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of Department 
of Surgery and Hospital Chief of Staff 

Guests : Mr. John Haigis, Former Trustee; Secretary Parks; Mr. 
Offenberg representing the Board of Higher Education; Mr. Ira 
Horowitz, Student Legal Services Attorney 

Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having been complied with 
and a quorum of the Board of Trustees present and acting throughout, 
the meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. The first order of 
business was the approval of the minutes of the two previous meet- 
ings of the Board, that of September 3 and that of September 11. 
A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meetings of 
September 3 and September 11. 



Approval of 
Minutes of Pre- 
vious Meetings 



4000 



10-1-75 

Resolution of 
Appreciation for 
Mr. John Haigis 

TRUSTEE 



Resolution of 
Appreciation for 
Mrs. Betty 
Knowles 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman informed the Board that it was his great 
pleasure to read to the Board and present for its adoption two 
resolutions of appreciation for the services of two former Trustees 
Mr. John Haigis and Mrs. Betty Knowles. The Chairman first pre- 
sented the following resolution. 

When he left the Board last August, John Haigis was 
the senior Trustee in length of service. Appointed in 
1956 to fill the unexpired term of his late father, his 
interim tenure became nineteen years of truly oustanding 
service to the University. 

An exceptionally able and active Trustee, he served 
enthusiastically during the greatest period of change 
and growth in the University's history. He served on 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds from 1957 to 
1972, and as its Chairman from 1963 on. During this 
period of his leadership, all of the major expansion 
of the physical plant of the Amherst campus took place. 
The conception, design, and creation of both the Boston 
and Worcester campuses took place in those years, and 
the sum of capital expenditure during his years of 
leadership was nearly half a billion dollars. 

This is the record, but the intangibles were equally 
impressive. John always took a deep personal interest 
in the life of the University and he was known and ac- 
cessible to many segments of the University community 
throughout his years of service. 

In short, John was the best of Trustees, as those who 
worked with him in those years will gladly confirm. His 
was a standard which all present and future Trustees must 
only hope to match, and for that example, the Board of 
Trustees herewith expresses its deep gratitude. 

This resolution was unanimously adopted amid a standing 
ovation. President Wood said the University was much in Mr. Haigis's 
debt and described the resolution as an understatement. The resolu- 
tion was presented to Mr. Haigis, and he informed the Trustees that 
he had not been inactive since leaving the Board, but was teaching 
in the Town of Greenfield. He expressed his thanks to the Board 
for its expression of appreciation. 

First informing the Trustees that former Trustee Knowles 
was in California and was therefore unable to be at the meeting, 
Chairman Healey read a proposed resolution for the consideration 
of the Board. 

During her seven years as Trustee, Betty Knowles 
contributed in a very special way to the spirit as 
well as the work of this Board. In addition to her 



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TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

service on four committees, she was chairman of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee for three years and 
delegate to the Board of Higher Education. She al- 
most never missed a committee meeting or a board 
meeting, despite the special burdens of commuting 
many miles from her home. 

Betty's outstanding contribution to the Univer- 
sity was as an advocate and guardian of its physical 
environment. An artist in her own right, Betty had 
an intense and informed concern with both the aes- 
thetics and the functioning of the campuses. When 
the first buildings were being designed for Columbia 
Point, she visited the site and helped to select the 
exterior brick and insisted on the importance of a 
walkway along the new dike to take advantage of the 
water's edge. At the Amherst campus she watched over 
not only new major construction but the ongoing con- 
dition of the grass, the path and the pond. She 
consulted on the interior design and decoration for 
the Teaching Hospital and Medical School - including 
an experimental medical mural in one laboratory. 

In addition to this deep involvement in the work 
of the Board, Betty has contributed to its spirit. 
Her warmth and many kindnesses, her charm and constant 
good cheer, have made our undertaking both easier and 
better. 

With this resolution the Board expresses its sin- 
cere admiration for and gratitude to Betty Knowles 
for her contributions to the University and to the 
people of the Commonwealth. 

This resolution was also unanimously adopted. At the 
Chairman's request, Secretary Hardy read the following letter from 
former Trustee Knowles to the Board. 

It has been my privilege and pleasure to serve 
on the Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts for over seven years. I certainly do not 
need a "croix de guerre" for my services although 
at times there was a strong suggestion of "war" in 
some of the meetings. Witness the student riots at 
the Statler and again at the Boston Howard Johnson's 
a few years ago. My service to the University is 
its own reward and no accolade is necessary. 



10-1-75 



I hope I have left behind a small measure of 
an increased awareness of the humanities.... 
whether it is a heightened appreciation of 



4002 



10-1-75 



TRUSTEE 



President ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

architectural forms and relation of same to its en- 
vironment; or whether it is a further reaching for 
compatible relationship between the interacting 
forces of the many personalities in students, fac- 
ulty and administration. 

I am, and will continue to be, exceedingly proud 
of all of our campuses and seven field stations. 
Their growth and prowess is truly exceptional. 
Only coordinating good leadership from all fac- 
tions could accomplish this. 

Unlike the sometimes too long reports of Build- 
ings and Grounds and also those of the Board of 
Higher Education I would like to conclude' this 
brief report by saying that although it may take 
five years to get an administration in high gear," 
it often takes seven years to make a Trustee in 
a process than can be painful but never dull. Now 
it is time to leave. I wish you all the very best 
in your future dedication to the complexities of 
Higher Education. It deserves your very best! 



Addressing the Board at the Chairman's request, President 
Wood said he hoped someday to focus his primary attention on aca- 
demic matters, but was again forced to address first the pressing 
University Budget budget problem. The budget bill for the Commonwealth was presently 

being debated on the House floor, he said, and on Thursday he and 
the other segments would tesgify before the Senate Ways and Means 
Committee. He reported the legislative leadership's intention to 
move quickly once the hearings were completed. 

The President reminded the Trustees that he had informed 
them at the September 11 meeting that certain procedural activities 
of the Executive Branch threatened the short-run ability of the 
administration to keep the University open. At that meeting, he 
said, the Trustees had approved five votes designed to allow the 
meeting of a prospective shortfall in the payroll accounts. The 
Board had approved at that meeting a request to the House and 
Senate Ways and Means Committees for critical needs funds in the 
amount of $1.4 million. The approval of that request, he said, 
had allowed the University to meet the payroll of September 26, 
although the payroll accounts had been out of money. 

Another vote, the President recalled, had authorized the 
transfer of funds from several subsidiary accounts to the payroll 
accounts. On September 12 the Comptroller of the Commonwealth 
had been asked to transfer $40,000, which he had not yet done. 
It was the University's position, of course, that such transfers 
were authorized under Chapter 75. Counsel Searson had met with 
Mr. McKinnon, the Comptroller, that morning, but no progress had 
been made. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On September 9, said the President, the University ad- 
ministration had asked for its October allotment under the interim 
budget early in order to help meet the payroll shortfall. The 
allotment had not been granted. He recalled that the Board had 
authorized the consolidation of payroll periods, and reported that, 
as a result of the lack of action by the Executive branch, 77 
senior administrators, including the President and the Chancellors, 
would have their pay deferred the week of October 3. 

The President next reported that Governor Dukakis had 
appointed a management task force of experienced administrators 
from the private sector to conduct a 12-week in-depth study of 
state government. The Governor had emphasized the importance of 
this study and that he intended to implement its recommendations. 
President Wood said he welcomed this study, and any informed ad- 
vice about University operations, but expressed his concern about 
two aspects of the study. First, he and the other members of the 
Advisory Commission of the Board of Higher Education believed the 
task force should contain more adequate representation from the 
public sector. Second, the Governor had appointed as Chairman of 
the Review Team for Higher Education Mr. Charles Smith, Vice Pre- 
sident for Finance of Boston University. The President said he had 
a high personal regard for Mr. Smith, but said there was a serious 
conflict of interest in his appointment, since the President of 
Boston University had been highly critical of public higher educa- 
tion while seeking a substantial commitment of public funds. Speak- 
ing on behalf of the Advisory Commission of the Board of Higher 
Education, which includes among its members President Fulham of 
Suffolk University, President Wood said that there should be better 
representation from the public sector and that someone else besides 
Mr. Smith should act as Chairman. However, he said he planned to 
extend complete cooperation to the task force. 

President Wood pointed out that the Trustees had before 
them a Statement of Goals for the Medical School (Doc. T76-010) , 
about which Chairman Healey would comment in the report of the 
Executive Committee. The final report of the Crispell Visiting 
Committee for the Medical School would soon be available, he said, 
and observed that these would constitute a major set of documents 
by which the Trustees could evaluate the program and plans of the 
Medical School. Having completed his report, the President called 
on Chancellor Bromery of the Amherst campus. 

Chancellor Bromery described the campus's financial 
difficulties caused by the Budget problem. First, he observed 
that the campus was operating on one-twelfth of a percentage of 
last year's Budget which, he said, did not fit the campus's spend- 
ing patterns, although the campus was doing its best to live with 
the constraint. Second, he said the inability to transfer funds 
caused a payroll shortfall for the current week, but would have its 
most serious impact in the next several weeks. He said that all 



4003 



10-1-75 



UM/Worc ester — 

Statement of 

Goals 

(Doc. T76-010) 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor's 
Remarks 



4 04 



10-1-75 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester — 
Acting Dean's 

Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

this was in the context of more students and fewer faculty than 
last year. The Chancellor said he was most concerned with the 
Commonwealth's accumulated investment in high-quality education, 
and expressed the fear that if the current fiscal procedures 
continue, this quality will be damaged. 

Chancellor Golino of the Boston campus spoke next, and 
reported the Boston campus had 7,473 students by headcount with 
funds allotted for an enrollment of 6,600 students. In addition 
to this, he said, 30 positions were being held vacant. He said 
the campus would continue to cope as best it could with these 
serious restraints. He reported that the campus is now in the 
process of planning for the next academic year, when it doesn't 
even know how it will manage in the immediate future. The worst 
thing about the present situation, he said, was the uncertainty, 
which made it extremely difficult to plan. He believed that the 
quality of the University was very much in jeopardy. 

Acting Dean Butcher of the Worcester campus echoed the 
statements of the other Chancellors about the serious difficulties 
of planning rationally in an educational institution with such 
budget uncertainties. This, he said, was undoubtedly the greatest 
problem. 

Chairman Healey turned to Trustee Carlson, Chairman of 
the Budget Committee, for his report. Trustee Carlson reported 
that the Budget Committee had met six times since April, and 
throughout this period had been kept fully informed of the budget 
developments which had taken place in the Executive and Legisla- 
tive branches of state government. The most recent meeting, said 
Trustee Carlson, had followed the Board meeting of September 11, 
when the Committee had voted to concur with the President's certi- 
fication of critical needs funds and positions. 

Trustee Carlson said that at the meeting of September 11 
the Governor had made a statement which had not received the atten- 
tion it deserved. The Governor had remarked that his Administra- 
tion had received relatively greater cooperation from the Boards 
of the other segments of higher education than from the Board of 
the University. In this connection, Trustee Carlson pointed out 
what he called two salient facts: 

1. The Budget recommendation of the Secretary of 
Educational Affairs had called for a nine per- 
cent decrease in the University's actual ex- 
penditures for FY 1976 from FY 1975, while it 
had called for a two percent decrease in the 
expenditures of the other segments. 

2. The Secretary's recommendation for an appro- 
priation was actually an increase of $3.9 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

million for the other segments over their FY 
1975 appropriation, while his recommendation 
for the University represented a decrease of 
$3.7 million from the 1975 appropriation. 

Trustee Carlson emphasized that the University was being 
asked to sustain roughly a $4 million cut so that the other seg- 
ments could receive a $4 million increase. Given these circum- 
stances, he said, it was relatively easy for the other Boards of 
Trustees to be cooperative with the recommendations of the Execu- 
tive branch. 

Trustee Carlson next reported on the austerity measures 
the University had taken voluntarily in recognition of the fiscal 
plight of the Commonwealth. This effort, which had begun more 
than a year ago, had consisted of the following measures: 

1. A freeze on all vacant positions, except for 
those certified for by the Chancellors as 
critical. 

2. The deferral of all salary increases asso- 
ciated with promotions. 

3. The freezing of all nonpersonnel reserves 
pending a full assessment of need. 

4. A careful review of all budgeted nonpersonnel 
account spending. 

As a result of these actions, said Trustee Carlson, 
there had been as of April 459 vacant positions, while the total 
deficiency requirement in the FY 1975 budget had been reduced by 
45%. He called this a significant contribution to the reduction 
of the state's deficit. 

Trustee Carlson assured the Governor and the Legislature 
that the Board and its Budget Committee were fully aware of the 
fiscal situation of the Commonwealth, and he said the Board was 
determined to implement steps to minimize the long-term cost of 
providing high-quality education to students. He then cited ex- 
cerpts from the minutes of several recent meetings of the Budget 
Committee in which the Chairman had expressed the belief that the 
campuses would have to come to grips with a long-term decrease in 
available resources and that hard decisions about programs would 
have to be considered and made as soon as possible. 

In this connection, said Trustee Carlson, he would like 
to refer again to the President's briefing paper of September 11 
relative to the University's power to transfer between subsidiary 
accounts; namely, that the University's ability to live within 
what it believes to be the clear intent of the two interim budgets 



4005 



10-1-75 



4006 



10-1-75 



TRUSTEE 



Remarks by- 
Trustee Rowland 



Report of Execu- 
tive Committee 

Tuition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

is contingent upon the recognition that its authority to transfer 
funds is not impaired by the language of the two budgets. He 
said the ability of the University to meet its payroll in this 
period depends upon its authority to transfer funds, an authority 
denied by the Secretary for Administration and Finance. Trustee 
Carlson said it was difficult to see what benefit to the Common- 
wealth's fiscal situation could accrue from such administrative 
foot-dragging at this late stage, and he urged that these games 
stop so that the University can get on to the more substantive 
business of planning for this and ensuing years. 

Governor Dukakis asked that the President furnish his 
office, as soon as possible, information relating to the issue of 
fund transfers, so that he could discuss it with Secretary Buckley. 
The President said he would provide the Governor with a chronicle 
of conversations with the Secretary and a summation of the Univer- 
sity's position by 10:00 a.m. the next day (October 2). He said 
the next two weeks were of critical importance, and that he hoped 
the Executive Committee would stand ready to meet for a report 
from the President on the issue of transfers and the ability to 
meet the payroll, or to determine some other alternative course 
of action, if necessary. 

Chairman Healey noted the Governor's position at the 
September 11 meeting that the Board should not assume a confronta- 
tion through the utilization of the judicial process and asked 
the Governor if he would object if the Executive Committee acted 
for the Board in authorizing the use of such means only as a last 
resort to resolve a deadlock, should that occur. The Governor 
said he would have no objection to this, on the understanding that 
the Executive Branch would do its best to resolve the issue. The 
Chairman said that, in accordance with current practice, all mem- 
bers of the Board were invited to all meetings of the Executive 
Committee. He asked for the concurrence of the Board in this 
procedure and there was no objection. 

Chairman Healey next called on Trustee Rowland, who in- 
formed the Board that the Long-Range Planning Committee would meet 
with the Trustee Advisory Council on the Fine Arts on October 10 
at 2:30 at the Campus Center at UM/ Amherst for the purpose of 
hearing their report of past activities and of discussing future 
plans. She urged all Trustees to attend this meeting. 

Chairman Healey gave the report of the Executive Com- 
mittee, reporting first on its discussion of tuition. A briefing 
paper had been generated by the Office of the President which the 
Committee had discussed thoroughly without coming to conclusions. 
It had been the desire of the Committee that the President provide 
further information and recommendations both to the Committee and 
to all the Trustees to allow a free and full discussion of the 
issue. He said the Executive Committee would expect to make • a 
recommendation to the full Board for action by the December meeting, 
He encouraged the Trustees to communicate their view on the tuition 
issue to the Secretary. 



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Secretary Parks asked what the process was by which stu- 
dents and faculty could participate in the discussion, and the 
Chairman replied that the Chancellors would make arrangements for 
campus-level discussions by students and faculty. Expanding on 
this point, Chairman Healey observed that he would expect the multi- 
campus budget and planning committees to be involved as well and 
added that the campuses would naturally tailor their discussions 
to their own circumstances in the issue. 

Governor Dukakis said a full discussion should include 
the relationship of tuition to state scholarship aid and Chairman 
Healey agreed, saying that the Executive Committee had also focused 
on the extent to which the University could use the power of tui- 
tion waivers as financial aid. Secretary Parks proposed the prin- 
ciple that no student should be denied access to the University 
because of financial need. 

Chairman Healey reported that the Executive Committee had 
had an enlightened discussion of the proposed Statement of Goals of 
the Medical School (Doc. T76-010) . Suggestions for only minor 
changes had been made for the document, which had been composed by 
the administration and faculty of the School. The Chairman noted 
that copies had been distributed to members of the Board, and he 
said he looked forward to a full discussion and, he hoped, adoption 
of it at the November meeting of the Board. He also remarked that 
in the Committee's view, the document carried out the original 
intent of the Trustees in establishing the Medical School: to 
provide high-quality education and to try to motivate students to 
enter the field of primary care. 

Governor Dukakis remarked that he had read the one-page 
list of Medical School goals and believed they were excellent. 
He said he would like to see an ad hoc group assembled, perhaps 
including Trustees and the Dean, to work with the Commissioners of 
Public and Mental Health in developing a plan for cooperation be- 
tween the Medical School and other state health institutions. 
Acting Dean Butcher replied that the Medical School welcomed such 
an effort, and said the School already had an in-house task force 
working to identify the problems of the other state institutions. 
Mr. Lynton observed that there had been discussions between the 
University and the Executive Office of Human Services to lay the 
groundwork for such cooperation. 

The Chairman next asked for the approval of the list of 
Honorary Degree Candidates which had been circulated to all Trust- 
ees. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees confirm as recipients 
for Honorary Degrees to be awarded at the UM/ 
Amherst 1976 Commencement those candidates ap- 
proved in Executive Session of the Board of 
Trustees of this date and instruct the Chan- 
cellor of the campus to proceed with necessary 
arrangements. 



400? 



10-1-75 



UM/ Worcester — 

Statement of 

Goals 

(Doc. T76-010) 



Honorary Degrees 



4008 



10-1-75 

University Medal 
for Outstanding 
Service 

TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey reported on the Executive Committee's 
recommendation on the University Medal for Outstanding Service. 
He said it was fortunate that this person was present at the meet- 
ing, and observed that in his eight months as Acting Dean of the 
Medical School, Dr. Butcher had made as great a contribution to 
the University as many individuals who had been around for a much 
longer time. He congratulated Dr. Butcher for his unanimous selec- 
tion as recipient of the Medal. Dr. Butcher replied that he had 
never been so surprised in his life and said he wished to thank 
the Trustees from the bottom of his heart. The Chairman called 
for the concurrence of the Board and, upon a motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : That, in commendation of his many and dis- 
tinguished contributions to the University of 
Massachusetts, the Board of Trustees award the 
University Medal for Outstanding Service to 
Dr. Reginald W. Butcher and present the award 
at a suitable occasion. 

Report of Com- Having completed the report of the Executive Committee, 

mittee on Student! Chairman Healey called upon Trustee Shearer to report for the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs. Trustee Shearer reported first on the 
proposed authorization of the Legal Services Office at UM/Amherst 
to represent students in criminal cases and in suits against the 
University. The Committee had proposed that the authority be 
granted for the duration of the current fiscal year, to be restu- 
died at its expiration, and Trustee Shearer recommended this vote 
to the Board. 

Several Trustees expressed reservations about authorizing 
the use of student funds, collected by Trustee authority, for suits 
against the University. Others were concerned that this activity 
would snowball and eat up funds in frivolous actions to the detri- 
ment of the student's real legal needs. 

Trustee O'Keefe and Mr. Ira Horowitz, an attorney for 
the Office, explained that there was a Legal Services Governing 
Board made up of undergraduate and graduate students which set 
general policy about the kinds of services it would provide. One 
policy was that the Office could not engage in civil actions of a 
fee-generating character, such as a suit for damages suffered by 
a student in a fall in a residence hall. Civil suits could only 
be brought in instances where the University was alleged to be 
violating a law, such as an antidiscrimination statute. Mr. 
Horowitz pointed out the analogous situation where it was not un- 
common for government to pay for legal representation of persons 
engaged in suits against a government agency. 

There was also discussion of the issue of criminal rep- 
resentation, and the observation was made that the problem faced 
by students was not finding representation, but finding it at an 
affordable cost. 



I 



Affairs 

UM/Amherst — 
Legal Services 
Office 



I 



I 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Carlson said that this matter had been under dis- 
cussion for several months, and expressed the view that the experi- 
mental authorization was a wise compromise which would not lock the 
Trustees into an irrevocable commitment. The motion was therefore 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the attorneys employed in the Student Legal 
Services Office be authorized to represent stu- 
dents in criminal matters and to engage in liti- 
gation against the University on their behalf, 
such authorization not to extend to the initia- 
tion of any new such litigation after the end of 
the current fiscal year without review and con- 
firmation of such authorization by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Trustee Abrams cast a negative vote. Trustee Robertson 
abstained. 

Trustee Shearer continued her report with a statement on 
the proposed Cooperative Housing Agreement for Family Housing at 
UM/Amherst. It had been the consensus of the Committee, she said, 
that action would not be appropriate at this time because of several 
legal and managerial problems in the proposed agreement. She said 
that Vice Chancellor Gage had been asked to supply information to 
the Committee on these points for discussion at subsequent meetings. 

Chairman Healey called upon Trustee Troy to report for the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy reported 
that, at a brief meeting that morning, the Committee had voted to 
recommend that the Board approve the Preliminary September 1975 
Graduation List for UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-009) . The motion was 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve and ratify the preliminary Grad- 
uation Lists of September 1, 1975, UM/Amherst, 
as certified by the recorder of that campus and 
as set forth in Doc. T76-009. 

Trustee Troy then reported to the Board in his capacity 
as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. The BHE had met on 
September 19, and had engaged in considerable discussion of the 
effect of the state Budget on the BHE. Serious concern had been 
expressed at the ability of the Board to continue to function if 
the cuts made in September were to continue in October. Concern 
was also expressed about the future of the Board in relation to 
the Executive Office of Educational Affairs, particularly its duties 
and responsibilities as a lay Board as distinct from the politically 
established Secretariat. 

Trustee Troy reported that the Board had taken a position 
opposing proposals that the general scholarship statute be changed 






4009 



10-1-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Family Housing 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Faculty 
and Educational 
Policy 

UM/Amherst — 
Preliminary Grad- 
uation List 
(Doc. T76-009) 



Report of Dele- 
gate to Board of 
Higher Education 



4010 



10-1-75 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel Action 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to permit a maximum of 35 percent of state scholarship funds to 
be allocated to the public sector. It had taken the position that 
the present level of 10 to 25 percent allocated to public colleges 
and universities should be maintained. 

Trustee Troy reminded the Trustees that the Commonwealth 
had maintained a contract with the State of Vermont for the educa- 
tion of a number of Massachusetts medical students at the Univer- 
sity of Vermont Medical School. Vermont now wished to raise the 
cost to Massachusetts of this arrangement. Senator James Kelly 
has an interest in this issue, said Trustee Troy, and he had 
asked the BHE to explore a number of problems growing out of this 
issue, as well as to attempt to clarify the long-range picture of 
medical training and resources in the Commonwealth. He asked, for 
example : 

1. That the BHE explore with Boston area medical schools, 
particularly Tufts and Boston University, the possibility of 

their admitting 100 Massachusetts students. 

2. That a broad study be conducted of where graduates of 
state medical schools actually take up practice, thus providing a 
clearer picture of area medical needs and resources. 

3. That this information be used to determine what con- 
tribution the Medical School is or should be making to the needs 
of the Commonwealth. 



On this subject, Trustee Troy expressed the hope that 
whatever BHE committee conducts this study avail itself of the con- 
tinuing studies made by the Medical School itself, since the school 
had never simply moved ahead into a void, but rather had operated 
on the best information available on present and future needs of 
the Commonwealth in medical education and the delivery of medical cafi 



After Trustee Troy's report, Chairman Healey moved that 
the Board approve a Personnel Action which had been circulated to 
all Trustees. The motion was seconded and it was 

VOTED : Whereas the administrative duties of Dr. William 
R. Hamilton, Jr., as Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 
tration and Finance at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston have precluded him from sus- 
taining his scholarly efforts in his discipline, 
he be granted administrative leave for on academic 
year commencing September 1, 1976, at half pay, 
in order that he may become current with the de- 
velopments which have occurred in his field. 

There was no other business to come before the Board, and 
the meeting was declared adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 



I 



I 



Glady^ I 



Keith Hardy Q 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



1 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT 



1 



J 



4011 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

November 5, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trust- 
ees Abrams, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Dukakis, Eddy, Fielding, 
Gordon, Morgenthau, Okin, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Snowden, 
Spiller, Troy, Weldon, Winthrop, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel , Assistant 
Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent : Trustees Anrig, Breyer , Shaler and Shearer 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Coolely, 
Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Gartenberg, Bud 
get Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization 
and Management; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Father Walsh, Aca- 
demic Advisor to the President; Mr. White, Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Ms. 
Rahaim, Assistant to the Chancellor; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Ad- 
ministration and Finance; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Mr. Larner, Director of Public Affairs; Professor Marshall, 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Represen- 
tative 

Guests : Secretary Parks; Mr. Keith, Interim Chancellor of Higher 
Education; Mr. Henry Ragin, UM/Amherst student; Ms. Ellen Gavin, 
UM/Amherst Student Trustee-designate 

The provisions of Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958 having 
been complied with and a quorum of the Board of Trustees present 
and acting throughout, the meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. 



The minutes of the October meeting were submitted for ap- 
proval. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
October 1, 1975. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 



Approval of Min- 
utes of Previous 
Meeting 



4012 



11-5-75 



Executive Session 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel Action 
(Doc. T76-022) 



Report of Execu- 
tive Committee 

UM/Worcester — 

Statement of 

Goals 

(Doc. T76-010) 



Classifications 

of Position 

Titles 

(Docs. T76-018, 

T76-020) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss the can- 
didate for the position of Chancellor/Dean of 
UM/Worcester and the candidate for the Vice Pre- 
sident of Management and Business Affairs. 

At 3:15 p.m. a motion was made and seconded and it was 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

After the executive session, the Chairman announced the 
following vote: 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the Personnel Action, 
University of Massachusetts, Worcester, as 
contained in Document T76-022, thereby ap- 
pointing Dr. Roger J. Bulger as Chancellor 
of the University of Massachusetts at Wor- 
cester, Dean of the Medical School, Pro- 
fessor of Medicine with Tenure and Professor 
of Community and Family Medicine with Tenure. 

Trustees Fielding and Okin were recorded as abstaining. 

The Chairman called on President Wood. The President in- 
dicated that, because of the length of the executive session and 
the lateness of the hour, he would forego his report. He reported 
for the Executive Committee, however, speaking first about the 
Statement of Goals of the Medical School (Doc. T76-010) . He said 
this document had been initially reviewed by the Trustees at their 
October meeting, and had been circulated to them in the interim 
for their comment. He said it had had an important effect on the 
General Court in its deliberations on the budget of the University 
Hospital this year, and constituted an impressive statement of the 
goals and public purpose of the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To endorse the Statement of Goals for the 
University of Massachusetts Medical Center 
as prepared by the Faculty and Administra- 
tion of the Medical School, dated September, 
1975, Trustee Doc. T76-010. 

The Chairman turned to two Classifications of Position 
Titles (Doc. T76-018, T76-020) . Upon motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the amendment to Classi- 
fication of Position Titles as contained in 
Document T76-018. 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the amendment to Classi- 
fication of Position Titles as contained in 



I 



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P 







4013 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 


11-5-75 


1 


Document T76-020, provided that the respon- 
sibilities of said position shall be subject 
to further clarification as approved by said 
Board. 




TRUSTEE 


VOTED: The Classification of Position Titles under 
the Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 


■ ■' ! ■;•.!•" 




1962 shall be fixed in a weekly salary range 






from a minimum to a maximum or fixed at a 
specific weekly salary rate which shall not 
be changed except by vote of the Board of 
Trustees and such classification shall not be 
designated by any job group number or grade. 

VOTED: In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
648 of the Acts of 1962, the position titles 
in the Professional Staff (Docs. T76-020, T76- 
018) are classified at a weekly salary rate 
specified after the title of position subject 
to subsequently being amended, revised, added 
to or repealed by the Board of Trustees under 
the provisions of said Chapter 648. 






Chairman Healey turned next to a proposed Personnel Ac- 


Personnel Action 


m 


tion (Doc. T76-021) , the appointment of the Vice President for 


(Doc. T76-021) 


1 


Management and Business Affairs. The vote taken in executive 




1 


session, he said, had been the following: 






VOTED: To concur with President Wood's appointment of 






the Senior Vice President for Management and 






Business Affairs as contained in Document 






T76-021. 






VOTED: Every personnel action shall be subject to the 






policies and procedures now in effect as sub- 






sequently amended, revised, added to or repealed 






by the Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 






fessional personnel under provisions of Chapter 






648, 1962. The classification, salary range and 






descriptive job specification for each position 






to which a member of the professional staff is 






hereby appointed, promoted, transferred or deter- 






mined shall be as hereafter determined by the 






Board of Trustees or under their authority. 




The President praised Mr. Janis for his experience and 
talent, and said the appointment came at a time of great need for 






a University-wide capability in management. 




1 


The Chairman next called on Trustee Troy for the report 




II 


of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy 





4 014 



11-5-75 

Committee on Fac- 
ulty and Educa- 
tional Policy 

TRUSTEE 

UM/Amherst — 

Appointment of 

Dean 

(Docs. T76-016, 

T76-025) 



UM/Amherst — 
Transfer of 
Dance 



Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) 



UM/Amherst — 
School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

reported first on the proposed concurrence of the Board with the 
Appointment of Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathe - 
matics at UM/Amherst (Docs. T76-016, T76-025) . Professor Shapiro, 
presently serving as Acting Dean, had originally refused to allow 
the Search Committee to consider his name as a candidate, but when 
the person the Committee recommended had declined to accept the 
offer on account of the salary, Professor Shapiro had agreed to 
be a candidate. The Search Committee had then unanimously rec- 
ommended his name, and he had been appointed by the Chancellor 
and concurred with by the President. Upon motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 

VOTED : To concur with the appointment by the Chancellor 

of the Amherst campus of Professor Seymour Shapiro 
as Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics, as detailed in Docs. T76-016 and 
T76-025. 

The next item was a progress report on the transfer of 
Dance from the School of Physical Education to the Department of 
Fine Arts and Humanities at UM/Amherst. Acting Vice Chancellor 
Alfange had reported that the transfer had in fact taken place, 
but that some of the administrative and formal details had yet 
to be worked out . 

The Committee had then turned to a report on the imple- 
mentation of the Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. T75-125) . In 
addressing personnel actions, the provosts of the campuses had 
sent memoranda to the persons responsible at each level for review 
of personnel matters, explaining the meaning and requirements of 
the policy. They had also met with the deans to explicate the 
process further. 

There had been much discussion on the differing approaches 
of the campuses to this subject, particularly with respect to fac- 
ulty participation and engagement. The Amherst Faculty Senate, 
for example, had acted with despatch to the need for review of the 
document when first drafted, and had in fact suggested 53 large 
and small revisions. The Boston campus had moved more slowly, 
however, since the unicameral system of UM/Boston governance pro- 
vided for participation of students and faculty in all actions 
taken. For this reason, the process of review and reaction for 
this faculty personnel policy was cumbersome and complex. 

The Committee next discussed the two academic reviews of 
the School of Education at UM/Amherst: that of the Ad Hoc Faculty 
Senate Review Commiteee and that of the Visiting Committee for the 
School of Education, sometimes called the Goodlad Report. Acting 
Dean Fischer of the School had said that the School would respond 
positively to some recommendations and reject others. Mr. Alfange 
had said that reports had been widely read and that they had been 
generally regarded on the campus as both balanced and fair. 



I 



■ 



■ 



1 



TRUSTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Commenting on the 
had described the 
which had greeted 
essentially one of 
fogey ideas." He 
was now healthier, 
come about. This 
vances that many p 
several years, des 



response of the School to the reports, Mr. Alfange 
contrast between the present response and that 
the Fairbairn Report of 1971, which had been 

saying, "Go to hell; we don't want your old- 
said the atmosphere and attitude of the School 

and added that many basic changes would have to 
could be done, he said, without undoing the ad- 
eople feel have been achieved over the past 
pite serious and embarrassing failures. 



After the Committee heard from Associate Provost Bischoff 
on the details of the search for a new dean and of the work of the 
several other committees established to study and develop new 
directions for the School, Trustee Troy reported that several Trust- 
ees had expressed concern at the leisurely pace at which these ac- 
tivities were taking place. It had been pointed out that, while a 
study of curriculum and programs might take as long as six months, 
a study of the purpose and practical validity of the School should 
not take that long. 

President Wood had pointed out, said Trustee Troy, that 
we would soon be faced with plans for an FY 1977 Budget, and 
stressed that we must have specific answers to practical questions 
about the School, because budget and programs go together. The 
President had listed several issues regarding the relation of the 
School to the state colleges and to the changing needs for teacher 
education in today's market, and emphasized that answers to these 
questions would be needed before spring, by which time the FY 1977 
budget process would be well along. 

The Committee had felt that the problem of identification 
of issues that must be solved in the School of Education had been 
clarified by the reports and by other means, but the Committee had 
not felt that the School of Education and others were moving with 
a sufficient sense of urgency. Trustee Troy said speedier and more 
decisive action was needed. 

Finally, Trustee Troy reported that Trustee Morgenthau 
had asked that the Committee discuss the academic implications of 
the organization and centralization of the University to examine 
the interaction of governance and the issues of centralization and 
autonomy. It had been agreed that such a discussion would be on 
the agenda of the next meeting with the faculty representatives 
beginning the discussion. 

Following this report, Chairman Healey called on Trustee 
Carlson to report for the Committee on the Budget. At the Com- 
mittee's October 28 meeting, said Trustee Carlson, it had again 
been emphasized that the Amherst and Boston campuses must get down 
to the difficult business of outlining program options that will 
affect both enrollment planning and expenditure levels. The 
Chancellors had pointed out that, while long-range shifts of prograir 






5 



11-5-75 



Organization and 
Centralization 
of the University 



Report of Com- 
mittee on the 
Budget 



4016 



11-5-75 



TRUSTEE 



Preliminary FY 
1977 Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were under way, it would be several years before they would bear 
fruit. While realizing this, the Committee had yet urged that the 
job get under way as soon as possible. Mr. Lynton had advised the 
Committee that the broad outlines of program adjustments would be 
available by early January. 

Mr. Gartenberg had advised the Committee on the public 
hearings which were planned for November 6 under the aegis of the 
Secretary of Educational Affairs. Undersecretary Wolfman had been 
present at the meeting, and there had been a good deal of ques- 
tioning and discussion of the purpose of these hearings. 

Finally, Mr. Gartenberg had informed the Committee that 
the University would be expected to present a preliminary FY 1977 
budget on November 17, even though there was not as yet an FY 1976 
budget, and that for this purpose the Trustees would need to au- 
thorize the President to prepare such a request, which would also 
be presented to the Trustees at the December meeting. Trustee 
Carlson moved this vote. 

Trustee Gordon asked for an explanation of the figure 
of $109 million in the proposed vote. He said he understood the 
time constraints, but asked if it was wise to impose a ceiling 
when the actual figure to be requested was not yet known. He 
pointed out that a target could be sought without recording it in 
the vote. Trustee Carlson said he believed that the figure had 
been recommended merely as a guideline maximum to be used in the 
development of the actual budget. Trustee Troy remarked that he 
agreed with Trustee Gordon's statement. Chairman Healey asked 
for the President's views. President Wood explained that the 
figure was designed (1) to help the campuses deal with the under- 
standable pressures for a change in the growth patterns of pre- 
vious years; that is, to avoid the great de-escalation that had 
occurred in FY 1976, (2) to enable the University to make a pre- 
sentation at the FY 1977 budget hearings currently under way, and 
(3) to enable the Budget Office to meet its own schedules. He 
agreed that the figure was an artificial one in light of the lack 
of an FY 1976 Budget. 

Secretary Parks said that the Governor had had to leave 
the meeting early, and had asked him to express his position as 
follows: the Administration had asked all departments to submit 
FY 1977 budgets which do not exceed 90 percent of FY 1975 expendi- 
tures, because even if the Commonwealth's Budget is balanced in 
FY 1976, there will be no added resources in FY 1977 to support 
increases. For that reason, he would have to vote in the Governor's 
behalf against this vote as long as it contained the figure of 
$109 million. 

Trustee Carlson observed that this position was not 
resisted by the vote as written, since the figure of $109 million 
was a ceiling. Nothing could prevent the Trustees from actually 
submitting a lower figure in the end. Secretary Parks then added 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the Administration's position was that it could not support 
this vote unless it contained an explicit commitment not to exceed 
90 percent of FY 1975 expenditures, exclusive of the hospital. 
For purposes of clarification, Chairman Healey asked Secretary 
Parks if he was saying that regardless of what figure was in the 
vote, the Governor could not support it without a commitment to leve 
funding. Secretary Parks replied that this was not his position: 
if the figure was not in the vote, he said, he could support it. 
Chairman Healey asked what Secretary Parks 's position would be if 
there were no figure, and the Secretary described this as begging 
the question. The Chairman said the choice was between a ceiling 
or no ceiling at all. 

Mr. Gartenberg was at this point asked to explain the 
genesis of the $109 million figure. He said the figure was basic- 
ally the same as the FY 1976 budget at full funding. He observed 
that the figure requested by Secretary Parks was about $90 million, 
which he said was significantly lower than contemplated in the 
Legislature for the FY 1976 budget. 

Trustee Spiller expressed support for Trustee Gordon's 
position. To name a figure which is perhaps 10 or 15 percent 
higher than presently contemplated would tend to provide a psycho- 
logical motivation to go to a higher figure. To stay tight, he 
said, it would be necessary to follow Trustee Gordon's suggestion: 
delete the figure to make the University realize that the budget 
must be pressed down as far as possible. Both Trustees Spiller 
and Gordon, however, made clear their opposition to a commitment 
to level funding. 

Trustee Fielding suggested that the Board set a tone, if 
not an actual target figure, for the kind of figure it would like 
to come before the Budget Committee and then the full Board. With- 
out some instruction from the Board, it might be difficult for the 
University to know what to aim for. He observed that he had talked 
to members of the General Court in the previous several days, and 
that it had become clear to him that there would be no more tax 
packages next year, and that therefore something close to level 
funding for the Commonwealth was going to be necessary. He said 
he would hate to have the House Ways and Means Committee set his 
priorities for him, and suggested that the University would also 
wish to preclude that eventuality. 

Trustee Carlson said he believed that the fiscal strin- 
gency of the foreseeable future was well understood on the campuses, 
in the Budget Committee and in the President's Office, and it would 
be more appropriate for that understanding to be reflected in the 
minutes rather than trying to incorporate it into a formal vote. 

President Wood said that campuses had been exercising 
a spirit of "frontier frugality" for eighteen months, and were there 
fore suffering in trying to maintain viable institutions. Recog- 
nizing all of the realities, however, he stressed that the fiscal 
obligation of the Trustees, in his view, was to do whatever was 
necessary to preserve the academic integrity of the University. The 
value of that integrity in comparison to the other activities of 



T 



401? 



11-5-75 



4018 



11-5-75 



TRUSTEE 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Long- 
Rang e Planning 

UM/Amherst — 
Enrollment Guide- 
lines 



Advisory Council 
on the Fine Arts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Commonwealth, said the President, was of course a matter for 
the .General Court to decide. Finally, he commented that the 
Board would of course have to take into account the fiscal con- 
dition of the Commonwealth in whatever budget it develops, but 
in the end would have to decide on a figure. He added that it 
was not appropriate to do that here in light of the character 
of the discussion. 

The motion was seconded and it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to prepare the pre- 
liminary outlines of an FY 1977 Maintenance Bud- 
get Request. Further, to authorize the President 
to prepare a preliminary FY77 University Hospital 
Maintenance Budget Request, including up to date 
estimates of cost and revenue for FY77. The full 
and detailed FY77 Request shall be presented to 
the Board of Trustees for approval at the regular 
scheduled meeting in December 1975. 

Chairman Healey asked Secretary Parks if he wished to 
be recorded on behalf of the Governor, and the Secretary replied 
affirmatively. 

At the conclusion of the Budget Committee report, the 
Chairman called on Trustee Rowland to report for the Committee on 
Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland reported that the Committee 
had continued its discussion of proposed enrollment guidelines for 
the Amherst campus. Discussion of the guidelines had focused on 
five major points: (1) the proposed size of the graduate school, 
(2) the present status and implications of the graduate program 
review, (3) current application and enrollment trends for fresh- 
man, transfer, and graduate students, (4) the increasing number of 
students seeking readmission to the Amherst campus, and (5) the 
instructional costs associated with graduate and undergraduate pro- 
grams. The Chancellor had been asked to provide additional material 
on these questions. 

The other major agenda item for the Committee had been a 
discussion with members of the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts. 
Trustee Rowland indicated that the Trustees may look forward to an 
important and productive year of continued work by this group of 
performers, academicians and administrators in the several areas of 
the arts. They had had considerable praise for the quality of 
current University programs as well as interesting ideas about 
future directions. 



UM/Amherst — 
Opening of Fine 
Arts Center 



After the meeting, the Council members and some of the 
Trustees had helped inaugurate the new Fine Arts Center. The real 
inauguration, she said, had consisted of a performance by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra under Seiji Ozawa. Trustee Rowland also reported 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



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4019 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that she had assisted the Chancellor and the President to confer 
upon Mr. Ozawa the honorary degree of Doctor of Fine Arts. She 
reported, finally, that she had spoken with several members of the 
orchestra and they had been enthusiastic about the acoustics of 
the center. The "fine tuning" of the hall will continue, she said, 
and its programmatic and architectural recognition will continue to 
widen. 

Following the report of the Committee on Long-Range Plan- 
ning, Trustee Eddy asked whether the Committee discussions had taken 
into account the impact a shift in the enrollment mix of the Amherst 
campus would have on the town of Amherst. Trustee Rowland replied 
that this issue was very much a part of the thinking and discussions 
of the Committee. Trustee Eddy said she was not aware of any re- 
quests for information to the town's Planning Office, and she said 
she was certain that the office would welcome an opportunity to 
provide information in the impact of graduate and undergraduate 
students on the town. 

Chairman Healey called next on Trustee Gordon to report 
for the Committee on Finance. He said that the Committee had heard 
reports at its two meetings on University investments and insurance 
matters. The Committee had then heard a proposal with respect to 
Blue Cross Services for the UM/Worcester hospital. After a motion 
and second, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University of Massachusetts 
Teaching Hospital to utilize the Blue Cross 
draft procedure for services billed Blue Cross 
patients. Further, to authorize the University 
of Massachusetts Treasurer to designate three 
UM/Worcester employees for the purpose of sign- 
ing the Blue Cross drafts for services billed 
by the University of Massachusetts Teaching 
Hospital. 

The Finance Committee had next recommended that the 
Board discontinue the Student Room Deposit Fee established by the 
Board in Doc. T70-090. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 



VOTED ; To amend Doc. T70-090, said document to be re- 
designated T70-090A, by striking out that sec- 
tion beginning on page two and ending on page 
three which begins with the words, "In order 
to guarantee housing for a student in the res- 
idence halls..." and ends with the words, 
"... is authorized to formulate procedures 
and instructions to implement this policy...," 
and further that all deposits paid under this 
section by student presently enrolled at the 
Amherst campus be refunded, any balance remaining 
in the student room deposit fund after all depo- 
sits have been refunded to be made available 



11-5-75 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Finance 

UM/Worcester — 
Authorization of 
Signature for 
Processing Blue 
Cross Draft 



UM/ Amherst — 
Discontinuance of 
Student Room Depo- 
sit Fee 
(See Doc. T70- 
090) 



4020 



11-5-75 



TRUSTEE 

Charles Hiram 

Thayer Endowment 

Fund 

(Doc. T76-012) 



Homer J. Barr 
Endowment Fund 
(Doc. T76-013) 



Ohio Land Sale — 
Deed of Easement 
(Doc. T76-017) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to the residence hall system for student pro- 
gramming in FY 1977. 

Trustee Gordon then asked for a vote by the Board to es- 
tablish two new endowment funds for the Amherst campus: The 
Charles Hiram Thayer Memorial Fund (Doc. T76-012) and the Homer 
J. Barr Memorial Fund (Doc. T76-013) . There was no discussion and, 
after a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish the Charles Hiram Thayer Fund in 
the amount of $3,052 as an endowment fund for 
the purpose of using the annual earned income 
to provide short-term emergency loans at no 
interest to students registered in the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture. Repayment of 
current outstanding loans issued by the exist- 
ing trust fund loan account shall be added to 
endowment principal; whereas, loans issued 
effective with the date of this vote shall 
be returned directly to the loan fund for 
immediate reissue. All loans must be ap- 
proved by the Dean of the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture. 

VOTED : To accept the Homer J. Barr Memorial Fund as 
an Endowment Fund for the purpose of making 
annual awards of $150.00 from income earned 
during the preceding fiscal year to students 
actively participating in the intercollegiate 
wrestling program at the Amherst Campus. Se- 
lection of the recipient shall be made by the 
subcommittee on athletic grants-in-aid of the 
Amherst Campus Committee on Financial Aid and 
Scholarships. Unused income remaining after 
annual awards have been made shall be added to 
the principal of the fund on June 30. 

The last item in the report of the Finance Committee was 
an Easement for City of Columbus Water Line (Doc. T76-017) . This 
proposal would allow the City of Columbus, Ohio, to extend the 
city water line along Sudbury Road adjacent to University-owned 
lands. The lands were in the process of being sold, and the 
water line would enhance their value. A motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute on its behalf 
a deed of easement to the City of Columbus, 
Ohio as more particularly described and set 
forth in Trustee Document T76-017 and to ac- 
cept the City's offer of $1,815.00 as compen- 
sation for said easement as set forth in its 
letter of October 8, 1975, attached to said 



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Trustee Document; further, that the Treasurer 
be authorized to take such other action and 
to execute such other documents as may be nec- 
essary to effectuate the granting of this ease- 
ment and to ensure receipt of said compensation. 

The Chairman asked next for the report of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Spiller, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, first presented the proposed Worcester Motor Vehicle Regu - 
lations and Traffic Regulation Map (Docs. T76-014, T76-014A) . 
Following a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the Motor Vehicle Rules 
and Regulations for the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Worcester and the Traffic Regula- 
tion Map as set forth in Trustee Documents 
T76-014 and T76-014A, respectively. 

Trustee Spiller 's next item was a proposed Land Transfer 
— Town of Amherst to the University (Doc. T76-015) . There was no 
discussion, and after a motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept, for zero or nominal consideration, 
the fee in and to a certain parcel of land 
from the Inhabitants of the Town of Amherst, 
said land being a triangular parcel bounded 
and described as follows : 

Beginning at a point on the southerly side 
of a discontinued county layout named North 
Hadley Road, said point being the northwest 
corner of land owned by the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Amherst. Thence running along 
said North Hadley Road S . 61°-55 '-48" E., 
a distance of 70.86' to a point; thence 
running through land belonging to the In- 
habitants of the Town of Amherst S.28°-00'- 
45" W. , a distance of 219.80' to a point; 
thence running along land of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts (University of 
Massachusetts) N. 10°-09 '-00" E., a dis- 
tance of 231.01' to the point of beginning. 
Said parcel containing 7,787 square feet, 
and being part of those premises conveyed 
by the Trustees of the Massachusetts State 
College to the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Amherst by deed dated January 18, 1939 re- 
corded with Hampshire County Registry of 
Deeds in Book 940, Page 517. 



o 



11-5-75 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Build- 
ings and Grounds 

UM/Worc ester — 
Motor Vehicle 
Regulations 
(Docs. T76-014 
and T76-014A) 



UM/Amherst — 
Land Transfer , 
Town of Amherst 
to University 
(Doc. T76-015) 



4022 



11-5-75 



TRUSTEE 

UM/ Amherst — 
Naming of Theater 
in Fine Arts Cen- 
ter for Frank 
Prentice Rand 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Bus 
System 



Report of Delegate 
to Board of Higher 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Further, that the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, in consultation with the 
General Counsel to the University, by autho- 
rized to execute any documents which may be 
required to effectuate this vote. 

Trustee Spiller introduced a proposal to name the main 
theatre in the Fine Arts Center at UM/Amherst the Frank Prentice 
Rand Theater. He explained that numerous requests for this action 
had been made by different groups and individuals and had been 
fully discussed by the Committee. Trustee Troy strongly seconded 
the motion, and it was 

VOTED : That the Main Theater in the Fine Arts Center 
at the Amherst Campus be named "The Frank 
Prentice Rand Theater." 

Trustee Spiller' s final item was the approval of a Transit 
System Proposal for UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-019) . The proposal would 
have the effect of expanding and improving the University bus system 
in the University area. Trustee Eddy strongly endorsed the pro- 
posal, and said it was a fine example of the University trying to 
help out the Town of Amherst. There was no discussion, and it was 
accordingly 

VOTED : That the drawings and specifications for a 
bus storage and maintenance facility at 
UMass/Amherst (Doc. T76-019) be approved 
and the construction of such a facility be 
authorized subject to receipt of a capital 
grant from the U.S. Department of Transpor- 
tation. 

This completed the Buildings and Grounds report, and 
Chairman Healey called again on Trustee Troy in his capacity as 
Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Troy reported 
that the Board had met on October 17 and taken three actions of 
interest to the Trustees. First, the Board had voted to send to 
the Governor and the General Court an explanation as to why it 
could not comply with the statutory deadline for submission of its 
FY 1977 budget request. Second, the Board had voted to submit, 
as a separate FY 1977 Budget Request, an increase of $25 million 
in scholarship funds. It had been felt that this increase was 
imperative if many Massachusetts students were to have continued 
access to institutions of public higher education. Third, it had 
been voted that the University Without Walls program be continued 
over this year. Trustee Troy noted that the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate would complete its review of that program and make its 
final recommendation to the Board of Trustees sometime during this 
year. 

Following this report, Trustee Abrams moved that, in view 
of the selection of the new Chancellor/Dean of the Medical School, 



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the Board appoint a special committee, to include the commissioners 
of public and mental health, to oversee medical affairs. Chairman 
Healey observed that such a proposal was complicated because it 
would cut across the work of several standing Trustee committees. 
The President said that (1) the Board would need to move forward 
on an organizational structure for the hospital, which proposal 
was forthcoming, and (2) there was language in the Budget bill 
which called for a commission to study the transition period when 
the hospital first opens and which would report to both the Trust- 
ees and the General Court. 

There was no further discussion and no second to the 
motion. There was no further business to come before the Board 
and the meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 






4023 



11-5-75 



Cblady<0 Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4024 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

December 3, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 
Room 1009, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trust- 
ees Abrams, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Eddy, Gavin, Morgenthau, 
Robertson, Rothenburger, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, Spiller, Troy, 
Weldon, Winthrop; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; 
Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks represent- 
ing Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss 
Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Ms. Judd and Mr. Rasmussen, Office 
of the Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Garten- 
berg, Budget Director; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. 
Cahill, Staff Assistant; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant; Mr. O'Leary, 
Assistant Counsel; Mr. White, Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; Mr. Melley, Director 
of Public Affairs; Ms. Rahaim, Assistant to the Chancellor; Ms. 
Stack, Graduate Student Representative; Ms. Tillona, Assistant to 
the Chancellor; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty Represen- 
tative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and 
Provost; Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative 



ABSENT: Trustees Breyer, Gordon, Okin, Snowden 



The meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. Chairman 
Healey informed the Trustees and the large group of students pre- 
sent that in all of the prior discussion of the tuition issue, the 
Board had attempted to acquire and take into account the views of 
all concerned, including students. He said he had a list of stu- 
dents and others who had asked to be heard on the issue, and he said 
he would honor the list and not impose the usual time limitation. 
He asked that the speakers stick to the subject, however, and that 
they exercise a spirit of tolerance. He said he hoped no one would 
be disruptive, but added that he felt he knew when the point of 
disruption had been reached, and was prepared to take action should 
that become necessary. 

The Chairman reiterated that the Trustees wanted the same 
thing as the students: the highest quality education at the lowest 
possible cost to the student. He hoped that all comment would be 



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constructive and would recognize the sincerity of that commitment. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were presented. There 
was no objection, and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
November 5, 1975. 

Next the Chairman recognized Trustee Clark. Trustee 
Clark expressed her thanks to the other members of the Board and 
to the President for his efforts to persuade the Kennedy Library 
Corporation to build the library complex on the Harbor Campus at 
UM/Boston. She moved that a resolution of welcome be passed by 
the Trustees. Chairman Healey observed that there had been three 
finalists in the selection of the library site: the Amherst campus, 
the Boston campus and the split-site plan involving Harvard Univer- 
sity. He said the library had been welcome on either campus, and 
that the deletion of the Amherst campus had been the decision of 
the Kennedy Corporation. 

Chancellor Golino added an expression of welcome and 
jubilation for the library decision, and thanked the Board for its 
efforts in support of it. Secretary Parks congratulated the Boston 
campus on the decision, and asked whether the pledge to cooperate 
with the library in the resolution involved any commitment to a 
cost to the University. He was assured that the only cost would 
be that of staff time. There was no further discussion, and the 
motion was seconded and 



RESOLVED: 



That the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts accepts and welcomes the 
location of the John F. Kennedy Library at 
the Harbor Campus and pledges full support 
and cooperation to assure that the two ins- 
titutions working together create an appro- 
priate academic and physical environment for 
the Library, maintain close and effective 
relationships with the neighboring communi- 
ties, make possible an early construction 
schedule, and establish over time a national 
educational enterprise worthy of the Presi- 
dent that it honors. 



The Chairman turned next to the major matter before the 
Board, that of tuition. He asked Secretary Hardy to read the vote 
recommended by the Executive Committee, and she did so. She also 
read a second proposed vote, required by the state appropriation 
act, which established a level of tuition for nonresident under- 
graduates at a level equal to not less than 95 percent of the cost 
of instruction. The votes were moved. The Chairman next recog- 
nized the President for comment. 






4025 



12-3-75 



Approval of Min- 
utes of Previous 
Meeting 



Tuition 



4026 



12-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood made several observations about the first 
motion: (1) that the changes were to take place in four steps 
over a two-year period, (2) that the vote called for the develop- 
ment of a satisfactory financial aid package, and (3) that the vote 
called for the development of a policy for the use of tuition 
waivers as financial aid. He emphasized that no tuition increase 
would take effect unless these latter capabilities were achieved. 
He said this method was in sharp contrast to the actions of the 
other segments of higher education, and represented the modal 
position of 81 public land grant universities which grant doctoral 
degrees . 

The President said two concerns had underlain the consid- 
eration of tuition over the last several months: (1) the fact that 
the Legislature had already raised tuition for nonresident under- 
graduates and (2) the fact of public sentiment that tuition should 
reflect the rises in costs and prices over the last few years. He 
stressed that an adequate financial aid package would have to be 
developed before a tuition change would take place. 

Speaking of the second vote, the President pointed out that 
state law required the University to certify the average cost of 
instruction for nonresident undergraduates and to establish tuition 
at not less than 95 percent of that level. 

The Chairman next recognized Secretary Parks, who read to 
the Board a letter from Governor Dukakis. The Governor had reviewed 
the materials provided to the Executive Committee which had suggested 
that a tuition rate of $500-650 would be appropriate for resident 
undergraduates. His letter stated that he could support the motion 
only if the Board were to make "a specific, binding commitment to 
a tuition waiver policy and to the provision of other forms of 
financial aid sufficient to ensure that access to the University 
will not be denied to any student because of his or her financial 
circumstances . " 



The letter went on to say that the Board should include 
within any vote to raise tuition "a commitment to establish compre- 
hensive control at the Board level over fees charged at the campuses 
so that the University's ostensible commitment to low student costs 
would not be eroded through the back door of campus-level fee 
increases . " 

The Chairman next recognized Trustee Rothenburger , the 
student Trustee from the Boston campus. Trustee Rothenburger read 
a statement prepared by the UM/Boston Student Trustee Office which 
opposed a tuition increase "for varied and profound reasons." These 
reasons were: (1) that UM/Amherst has one of the highest fee struc- 
tures in the country; (2) that an increase in tuition would do ir- 
reparable damage to the role UM/Boston was intended to play as an 
urban University; (3) that expectations of increased federal finan- 
cial aid, they believe, are "questionable at best," based on recent 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and impending events in Congress; (4) that the picture for state 
scholarship aid is bleak; (5) that a raise will put a severe strain 
on people at a time of high unemployment and when incomes have been 
outstripped by the cost of living; (6) that an increase in financial 
aid, even if it does materialize, will be inadequate; (7) that middle 
income students are often ineligible for financial aid; (8) that 
plans for a tuition waiver system are impractical because of adminis- 
trative difficulties and a lack of staffing; (9) that there are few 
summer jobs available while financial aid plans require students 
to raise $500 in the summer and (10) that the Commonwealth is con- 
sidering discontinuation of the guaranteed loan program because of 
the high default rate. Trustee Rothenburger concluded that these 
points provide "dramatic proof" that the Board should vote against 
any tuition increase. 

Following this statement, Trustee Gavin 

MOVED : That the meeting of the Board be recessed and 
transferred to the Student Union auditorium. 



The motion was seconded. Upon a roll call vote the motion 
failed. Trustees Dennis, Gavin, Rothenburger, Shaler and Winthrop 
voted aye. Trustees Abrams , Carlson, Clark, Croce, Healey, Morgen- 
thau, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Troy, Weldon, Wood, Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding, and Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis voted 
nay. Ayes: five ; nays: fifteen . 

Chairman Healey called upon Trustee Gavin. Trustee Gavin 
made a statement which strongly opposed a tuition raise. Her state- 
ment called upon the Board not to follow a trend, heralded by the 
reports of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, toward re- 
duction of access of middle- and lower-income persons to higher 
education. She also described the raise in tuition as an attempt by 
international capitalism to reduce public spending, thereby increas- 
ing the available pool of investment capital. She said students 
could not stand by while their future is jeopardized for sake of 
"political expediency." She said students "would be back" if tui- 
tion were raised. 

The Chairman recognized Secretary Parks, who said he was 
committed to equal access to public education for third-world peoples 
and to the principle that access to the University should not be 
denied to any students on the basis of financial need. At the same 
time, he said, he and members of the Legislature were aware and sen- 
sitive to the sentiment among the general public that the affluent 
were getting a "free ride" at a University which is supported by 
the taxes of the poor, whose children are frozen out. He continued 
that unless the Trustees raise tuition for those who can pay more, 
there will be such huge budget cuts that the education of all will 
be jeopardized. He said if there were an immediate referendum on 
the question of a raise in tuition, it would win overwhelmingly. 
A tuition raise, he said, was inevitable whether it was voted by 



12-3-75 



4028 



12-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Board or by the Legislature, and he called attention to that 
portion of the motion that provided for financial aid as a firm 
prerequisite to an actual raise in tuition. 

Trustee Shaler said he could not support the motion. He 
said that Secretary Parks was probably right that a referendum would 
support increases in tuition, but he added that this was because 95 
percent of the citizens of the Commonwealth believe that the tuition 
goes to support University programs, when in fact it goes to the 
General Fund. He described it as a tax, not a tuition. He said the 
Commonwealth had believed for too long that students were "nothing 
more than bottles of booze or packages of cigarettes to be taxed for 
the General Fund." 

Chairman Healey called for students and faculty who had 
submitted their names in advance to make their comments to the 
Board on this issue. UM/Boston representatives spoke first. 

Michael Ponaman, student Co-Chairperson of the UM/Boston 
University Assembly, told the Trustees that education was a right, 
not a privilege, and that tuition was as unconstitutional as the 
poll tax. He expressed skepticism about the prospects of increased 
financial aid, and said that the Trustees could pass such a tuition 
raise, but that collecting it would be more difficult. 

Marjorie Kir stein argued that the University was the sole 
means available to many citizens of getting an education. If tui- 
tion were raised, she said, it would push many of these persons out 
of the University at a time when they are suffering in other ways 
from the ills of the economy. 



Luke McCarthy, Chairman of the Student Activities Committee, 
called attention to a statement of the President which described 
the mission of the Boston campus to serve the needs of the lower- 
income citizens. He said a tuition raise would remove these same 
people from the rosters of the University, and the Board would have 
failed the purpose for which the Boston campus was established. 

Bill Hollis said that the Board was dealing with critical 
human elements, not just dry statistics. If tuition were raised, he 
said, 1,500 students would be forced to drop out next year. The 
Board should keep the cost of attending the University as low as 
possible, he added, and it had no right to destroy people's lives. 

Bernard McNamara, representing medical students, stated 
his view that a tuition increase was probably inevitable. If there 
were to be an increase, however, it was necessary to increase the 
financial resources which were available to medical students, since 
80 percent of medical students cannot support an increase from their 
own resources. He pointed out the high degree of indebtedness common 
to medical students who have completed four years of undergraduate 
work. 



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Secretary Hardy next called on the student speakers from 
the Amherst campus. The first UM/Amherst speaker was Kenneth Somers, 
Speaker of the Undergraduate Student Senate, who stated that suffi- 
cient data is not presently available for conducting a sound anal- 
ysis of the financial need of students. He also predicted a $325 
increase in the cost of attendance would require $2.4 million more 
in federal aid for students already receiving financial aid, before 
new applicants or additional students on financial aid lists could 
be considered. For this reason he was skeptical of chances for off- 
setting a tuition increase with federal financial aid. He urged 
that this vote be postponed until a comprehensive financial aid 
package was developed. 

Chairman Healey restated the conditional nature of the pro 
posed vote, emphasizing that the tuition raise would not take effect 
unless an adequate financial aid package were developed first. 

Peter Knowlton accused the Board of not taking into con- 
sideration the plight of the working class in its considerations of 
tuition. He cited figures which suggested that the working class 
was in worse condition this year than last, and said that action 
would take education out of the reach of working people. He said 
the tuition raise would be met by a raise in the level of protest. 

Trustee Rothenburger pointed out that it was a mistake 
for some students to assume, as indicated by certain of their re- 
marks, that all the Trustees were non-working class people. He 
knew for a fact that several Trustees were working class, and such 
a presumption was detrimental to the quality of the debate. 

Professor Alvin Winder of the School of Nursing opposed 
a tuition raise on behalf of the Massachusetts Society of Professors 
and of the Faculty of the Amherst campus. He cited and disputed 
several arguments advanced in favor of a tuition raise. Secretary 
Parks asked if Professor Winder was aware of the option of tuition 
waivers, and further asked if he did not think that would be help- 
ful to students. Professor Winder pointed out the "indignity" of 
establishing financial need. Secretary Parks observed that estab- 
lishing financial need always involved indignities and would con- 
tinue to do so, if there were no tuition raise, as long as there 
were tuition. 

Luis Nunez said a tuition raise would have a disastrous 
effect on foreign students who were not in a position to increase 
their scholarship support. He said that corporations should be 
taxed, and not students. 

Patty Healey, representing the Nursing Council, described 
the harmful effects of recent budget cuts, pointing out that 150 
students had been asked not to return to the nursing program next 
semester. All this was before a tuition increase had even been 
contemplated. She said the Nursing Council and other councils 
would organize and refuse to accept a tuition raise. 



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Lily Hu, another foreign student, pointed out that there 
are 545 foreign students on the Amherst campus and that they are 
unable to receive more financial support from home. She said many 
are allowed to remain in the United States only by virtue of being 
students, and would be forced to leave if tuition were raised. 
Chairman Healey reiterated that it was the Legislature and not the 
Board of Trustees that had raised tuition for nonresident under- 
graduates, which included foreign students, and had based the 
level on the cost of instruction. This had been an extremely 
short-sighted action on the part of the Legislature, he said, and 
there was a great danger that it would set resident tuition on a 
similar basis. 

Paul Logue called attention to the fact that most stu- 
dents must work and study, and said a tuition raise would simply 
increase their burdens. Michael Federow expressed skepticism about 
the possibility of increased waivers, and described the effects of 
a tuition raise on graduate students. He repeated the charge made 
by Trustee Gavin earlier, that the tuition raise was motivated by 
a desire to increase the availability of investment capital. 

Bonnie Cain, from the Graduate Student Task Force on the 
Budget, said the Legislature apparently had a view of students as 
lazy malingerers, which she said was not true, since so many stu- 
dents had to work to support themselves in school. She said that 
public higher education was not inefficient, as some had charged. 

C. O'Donnell Boyce, also from the Budget Task Force, said 
that students had attempted to meet the Trustees halfway with ra- 
tional arguments, but that Trustees had made no rebuttals. He de- 
scribed the effects of a tuition raise on students, and said that 
the Trustees should not represent private or selfish interests, 
but should be standing with the students against a tuition raise. 
There had been little communication between students and the 
Trustees during the 1960's, he said, and while now there was 
communication, the Trustees were disregarding it. 

Ellen Carraciolo expressed frustration at her sense that 
the students were not being listened to by the Trustees, and sug- 
gested that their minds were already made up. She said the argu- 
ment that a refusal to raise tuition would cost the University its 
fiscal autonomy was false, because it might be lost anyway. She 
said that students would resist the elitist trend disguised as 
fiscal autonomy, and would boycott the tuition raise. 

Henry Ragin, Copresident of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation, argued that financial aid doesn't work unless the Trustees 
guarantee access to those students who cannot pay. He said the 
students would not take a tuition raise lying down but would unite 
and react. 

Barbara Stack charged that the Executive Committee rec- 
ommendation was a mandate for the Board, and that therefore this 



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discussion was a meaningless ritual. She said the raising of tui- 
tion was an act to exclude the poor, the dependent, the unwanted 
and was intended to uphold the stratification of society. 

Stephen Dolan said that the University was the last chance 
for many people to get an education. He described the effects of a 
tuition raise, and pointed out that the Board was the creation of 
the Legislature and that the Legislature was the representative of 
the taxpayers. He argued that the taxpayers were against a tuition 
raise and said that the issue was too large to be decided by the 
Trustees; it should be decided by the Legislature, which he described 
as more accountable to the taxpayers. 

President Wood said that the Board of Trustees should un- 
derstand that the proposed vote was not for an immediate increase 
in tuition, and that it was not based on a blind stab for financial 
aid; the federal financial aid picture was expected to become clear 
by May 1976 following the student resources survey. He pointed out 
that the proposed increase was actually smaller than that recommended 
by the staff papers, and he added that in his view the Executive Com- 
mittee had been influenced by the substantial presentations of stu- 
dents at that time, and that the Trustees as a whole had been influ- 
enced by their presentation today. 



The issue of tuition was unavoidable, he said, and had 
been raised both by members of the Board and by sources outside the 
University. The Board had requested a set of papers which presented 
alternative courses of action, and had asked for reaction to these 
from the University community. The responses from students, faculty 
and administration of all three campuses had, in his view, had a 
substantial impact on the course that the Trustees actually took, 
particularly the graduate student presentation with respect to the 
budget cuts. 

The President said that this action was not a "quick fix" 
like some that had been taken by other segments and had not been a 
deliberation which went on without consultation with the University 
community. He said this was a hard judgment for the Trustees to 
make, and said that the outcome was not predetermined. 

The Chairman recognized Trustee Shaler, who 

MOVED : That the previous motion be tabled until: 

1. A comprehensive tuition waiver policy be 
developed which would assure that middle- 
and lower-middle income students not be 
denied admission to the University; 

2. The University has secured both the state 
and federal aid now anticipated; 



4031 



12-3-75 



4032 



12-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. The Board has a complete picture of any 
new fee increases and, thus, an idea of 
what the student's total financial obliga- 
tion will be. 

The motion was seconded. Trustee Rowland asked Mr. Garten 
berg to clarify the obligations of the University with respect to 
securing the anticipated federal financial aid. Mr. Gartenberg 
explained that the University's allotment of the Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant funds for FY 1977 would be affected by the total 
cost of attending the University, including tuition. Therefore, if 
the Board did not act now, the University's aid application which 
will be reviewed in January would be based on its present tuition 
and the University would receive less federal aid. Trustee Rowland 
remarked, in reference to Trustee Shaler's substitute motion, that 
the previous motion as written would place the Board in a position 
to rule out a tuition increase if the financial aid did not mater- 
ialize; if, on the other hand, it did not take action today, it 
would lose the opportunity for increased federal aid. 

Trustee Dennis asked whether the Trustee vote on tuition 
would have a specific impact on the amount of aid which the Univer- 
sity received, or was the federal government action one which in- 
volved all institutions of higher education as a whole. Mr. Garten- 
berg explained that each institution is reviewed separately on the 
basis of total cost, and that a tuition raise would have a specific 
impact on the amount of federal aid which the University receives. 

The President said he would not be happy with Trustee 
Shaler's motion, aside from the impact it would have on federal 
aid, because the University's position on tuition should be clear 
when the January legislative session begins to focus on the FY 1977 
Budget. Secretary Parks agreed, and said that the State Colleges 
had raised tuition, and the mood of the Legislature was to ask what 
the University's position was on tuition. If this position was not 
clear, he said, it would be extremely difficult to get a budget 
through without additional cuts. Furthermore, the Legislative 
leadership had called a meeting the week before at which it had 
made very clear, in the Secretary's words, that "they were going 
after higher education." He said this was an unpleasant fact which 
the University would have to face up to in its deliberations. 

The question was called for, and the substitute motion 
failed. Upon a roll call, Trustees Clark, Gavin, Rothenburger , 
Shaler, Shearer and Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 
voted aye. Trustees Abrams , Carlson, Croce, Healey, Rowland, 
Spiller, Troy, Weldon, Winthrop, Wood, Dennis, Morgenthau, Robertson 
Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding and Mr. Callahan repre- 
senting Trustee Anrig voted nay. Ayes: six ; nays: fifteen . 

The Chairman called for the previous motion on tuition, 
and it was seconded and 



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TRUSTEE 



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\ 



VOTED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

That the Board of Trustees establish for the 1978- 
79 academic year the following annual tuition rates: 
$525 for undergraduate students who are residents of 
the Commonwealth; $900 for students at the Medical 
School; $670 for graduate students who are residents 
of the Commonwealth; and $1,550 for graduate students 
who are not residents of the Commonwealth. To estab- 
lish further that present rates of tuition be increased 
in four stages commencing with the fall semester of 
1976 in accordance with the following schedule: 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1976-77 



Fall Sem. 
1976 



Spring Sem, 
1977 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


161. 


184. 


$345. 


Medical School 


315. 


345. 


$660. 


Graduate 

(resident) 


236. 


258. 


$494. 


Graduate 
(non-resident) 


482. 


547. 


$1,029. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-78 



Fall Sem. 
1977 



Spring Sem. 
1978 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


218. 


262.50 


$480.50 


Medical School 


390. 


450. 


$840. 


Graduate 

(resident) 


291. 


335. 


$626. 


Graduate 
(non-resident) 


645. 


775. 


$1,420. 



4033 



12-3-75 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1978-79 

Fall Sem. Spring Sem, 
1978 1979 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


262.50 


262.50 


$525. 


Medical School 


450. 


450. 


$900. 


Graduate 
(resident) 


335. 


335. 


$670. 


Graduate 
(non-resident) 


775. 


775. 


$1,550. 



4 34 

12-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



Application Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The foregoing tuition rates are not to take effect 
unless and until a financial aid program for imple- 
mentation in the fall semester of 1976 is established 
and approved by the Board of Trustees on or before 
May 5, 1976; further that said financial aid program 
shall include provision for tuition waivers, partial 
or otherwise, for students with demonstrated financial 
need, which need shall be determined in accordance 
with federally approved need analysis procedures. 

A roll call was requested, and Trustees Abrams, Carlson, 
Croce, Healey, Rowland, Spiller, Troy, Weldon, Winthrop , Wood, 
Dennis, Morgenthau, Robertson, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, and Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis voted aye. Trustees Clark, 
Gavin, Rothenburger , Shaler, and Shearer voted nay. Ayes: sixteen 
nays : five . 

The previous motion with respect to certification of not 
less than 95 percent of the cost of instruction for nonresident 
undergraduates was seconded and 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees, pursuant to the pro- 
visions of Chapter 684 of the Acts of 1975 (the 
appropriation act for Fiscal Year 1976) , certify 
that the average annual cost of instruction for 
each undergraduate student at the University of 
Massachusetts is $1,598; further, that effective 
January 1, 1976, the tuition charged to all non- 
resident undergraduate students at the University 
of Massachusetts shall be $1,550 per year or $775 
per semester; provided, however, that students 
participating in the New England Regional Stu- 
dent Program shall not be affected by this vote. 

A roll call was requested, and Trustees Abrams, Carlson, 
Croce, Healey, Rowland, Spiller, Troy, Weldon, Winthrop, Wood, 
Dennis, Morgenthau, Robertson, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig and Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis voted aye. Trustees Gavin, 
Clark, Rothenburger, Shaler and Shearer voted nay. Ayes: sixteen ; 
nays: five . 

The Chairman next called for the proposed establishment 
of an application fee, which was mandated by state law. Upon mo- 
tion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees, pursuant to the pro- 
visions of Chapter 684 of the Acts of 1975 (the 
appropriation act for Fiscal Year 1976) , estab- 
lish an application fee of $10 for each applicant 
for admission to the University who is a resident 



I 



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TRUSTEE 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and an ap- 
plication fee of $25 for each such applicant who 
is not a resident of the Commonwealth; provided, 
however, such fees shall not be charged to any 
applicant for admission to a program established 
for the disadvantaged, or to any student who shall 
have received an examination fee waiver from the 
College Entrance Examination Board. The adminis- 
tration at each campus is hereby directed to take 
reasonable steps to collect said fees for all 
applications received on or after July 1, 1975. 

The next matter was the proposed Mid-Semester Arrangements 
for College III Students at UM/Boston. Chancellor Golino explained 
that this was a pilot program in which fifteen students had been ad- 
mitted during November, and the campus requested that the Trustees 
authorize a reduced tuition rate for these students. There was no 
discussion, and a motion was made, seconded, and 



VOTED : 



That the following schedule of tuition and fees 
be established for fifteen students participating 
in a fall semester pilot program at the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston, College III, beginning 
November 1, 1975: 



Tuition (in-state) 



$75.00 



Tuition (out-of-state): $275.00 

Health Services Fee: $11.00 

Student Activities Fee: $7.50 

Chairman Healey called upon Trustee Carlson for the Report 
of the Budget Committee. Trustee Carlson informed the Trustees 
that the Committee had met to consider the FY 1977 budget request. 
The Committee members had reviewed the figures in the various staff 
papers provided to them and had questioned the Chancellors and 
other campus administrators closely. He pointed out that while the 
budget request exceeds the FY 1976 budget recently approved by the 
legislature by $10 million, the increase over the FY 1975 expendi- 
tures is less than the inflationary increase since that time. He 
observed that the budget request for the President's Office was 
$300,000 less than FY 1975 expenditures. He pointed out also that 
there would be 350 vacant positions in the University system under 
the proposed request, and pointed out further that the dollar in- 
creases were virtually all in academic programs, with support ser- 
vices unchanged or negligibly increased. 

Trustee Carlson informed the Trustees that the FY 1977 re- 
quest had been forwarded to the Executive Branch after the November 
26 Budget Committee meeting with the Committee's concurrence. When 
the final figures had been received by the University Budget Office, 
the Committee had met again and recommended a vote. 



4035 



12-3-75 



UM/Boston — 
Mid-Semester Tui- 
tion for College 
III 



Budget Committee 

FY 1977 Mainte- 
nance Budget Re- 
quest 
(Doc. T76-033) 



4036 



12-3-75 



TRUSTEE 



Nominating Com- 
mittee 

Health Affairs 
Committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President was asked to explain the budget review pro- 
cess after the request is submitted. He said the budget request 
approved by the Trustees was submitted to the Executive Branch and 
was considered by the Executive Branch in the calculation and sub- 
mission of the total Executive Budget, which is House I. Legally, 
however, the request to be voted today stands as the University's 
request to the Legislature which will be considered by that body. 

Secretary Parks told the Board that Governor Dukakis had 
asked all departments to submit budgets which were not in excess of 
90 percent of FY 1975 expenditures, which in the University's case 
would total $90 million. Therefore he would vote against the motion 

Trustee Eddy said, speaking as a part-time member of the 
University staff whose salary is paid by a federal grant, that the 
budget cuts of the magnitude proposed by the Governor for FY 1977 
would be disastrous. She said she was personally aware of strong 
faculty members who were looking elsewhere for employment because 
they saw no future for the University. Therefore, she said, the 
Board would have to take a strong stand in favor of a level of 
funding adequate to maintain the quality of the University. 

Chairman Healey agreed that this would be the position of 
the Board. He said the Board respected the Secretary's position, 
in view of the Governor's responsibility to allocate all the resources 
of state government, but he said the Trustees' responsibility was 
to act as representative of the interests of the University. There 
was no further discussion, and it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To approve the Maintenance Budget Request to- 
talling $105,112,093 for the University Oper- 
ations and $11,175,181 for the University 
Hospital . 

Secretary Parks cast a negative vote. 

The Chairman turned to the matter of a Nominating Com- 
mittee to make recommendations to the annual meeting in February. 
He asked for volunteers. He next informed the Board of the rec- 
ommendation of the Executive Committee that the Board establish a 
new standing Committee to deal with matters pertaining to the Med- 
ical School and Hospital. The motion was made, seconded, and 

VOTED : To establish, pending a revision of the Trustee 
By-laws, a standing Committee of the Board of 
Trustees to be named the Health Affairs Committee 
which shall review, and make appropriate recom- 
mendations to the full Board with respect to, 
matters relating to the Medical School and Uni- 
versity Hospital. Further, to authorize the 
Chairman of the Board to appoint five to seven ■ 
members of said Committee. 



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TRUSTEE 



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! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman next recognized Trustee Troy to report for 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Truncating his re- 
port in the interest of saving time, Trustee Troy reported that the 
campuses had been asked to submit to the Board for its approval 
campus-level implementation guidelines for the Academic Personnel 
Policy (Doc. T75-125) . There were no guidelines from the Amherst 
campus which required approval, and from the Boston campus there 
were two changes. These concerned Sections I and VI of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston Academic Personnel Policy Implementa- 
tion Guidelines which were entitled, respectively, Delegations of 
Academic Appointing Authority (Doc. T76-027) and Special Academic 
Appointments (Doc. T76-028) . Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To approve the Delegations of Academic Appoint- 
ing Authority for the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston, as set forth in Doc. T76-027. 

VOTED : To approve Section VI, "Special Academic Appoint- 
ments (Doc. T76-028)," Academic Personnel Policy 
Implementation Guidelines of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. 

Trustee Spiller presented the proposed Naming of the 
Recital Hall of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst. There was a motion, which was seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED ; That the Recital Hall in the Fine Arts Center 
at the Amherst Campus be named "Bezanson Re- 
cital Hall." 

There was no other business to come before the Board, and 
the meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 



^Gladyl Keith Hardy • 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



403? 



12-3-75 

Faculty and Edu- 
cational Policy 
Committee 

Implementation of 
Academic Personnel 
Policy 



(Doc. T76-027) 



(Doc. T76-028) 



Buildings and 
Grounds Committee 

UM/Amherst — 
Naming of Recital 
Hall in Fine Arts 
Center 



4038 



TRUSTEE 



PRESENT 



New Trustees 
Welcomed 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 4, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
Faculty Conference Room 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trust- 
ees Abrams , Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Dukakis, 
Eddy, Gavin, Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rothenburger , 
Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, Troy, and Winthrop; Mrs. Bluestone repre- 
senting Trustee Fielding, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secre- 
tary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder; Ms. Rasmussen, Office of the Secretary 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Okin and Spiller 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Eller, Asso- 
ciate Vice President for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Associate 
Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organiza- 
tion and Management; Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; 
Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, the Assistant to the Pres- 
ident; Mr. Cahill and Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistants 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Melley, Public Affairs 
Director; Ms. Rahaim, Assistant to the Chancellor; Professor Wilkin- 
son, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Babcock, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative; Professor Patterson, Boyden Professor of the Univer- 
sity 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Butcher; Dr. Wheeler, 
Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Hospital Chief of Staff; 
Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Mr. Stockwell, Asso- 
ciate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital Director; Pro- 
fessor Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. 
Brennan, Student Representative 

Guests : Secretary Parks; Mr. Leroy Keith, Chancellor of Higher 
Education 

The meeting was called to order at 2:05 p.m. The Chairman 
began by welcoming two new Trustees to the Board: Sylvia K. Burack 
and Ogretta V. McNeil. He also mentioned that this was the first 
meeting in their official capacities of Chancellor Roger J. Bulger 



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TRUSTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Medical School and Jay Janis, Senior Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs. 

The minutes of two meetings were presented: those of the 
Board of Trustees of December 4, 1975 and those of the January 7 
meeting of the Executive Committee. There was no objection or dis- 
cussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
December 4, 1975. 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
January 7, 1976. 

The Chairman called on the President, who advised the 
Trustees of two documents before them: the Annual Report of the 
President and the final report of the Visiting Committee for the 
Medical School, the so-called Crispell Committee. The President 
expressed his gratitude to the distinguished members of the Crispell 
Committee and he said it had been most helpful in its two years of 
life in advising the Trustees on the goals of the Medical School 
and the opening of the University Hospital. 

The President continued that the Hospital had opened two 
weeks before, and he said that former Chancellor Soutter had been 
on hand to welcome the first two patients. He described it as an 
auspicious occasion. 

The President then called on Chancellor Bromery of the 
Amherst campus. Chancellor Bromery extended a personal welcome to 
Chancellor Bulger. The President next called on Chancellor Golino 
of the Boston campus, who informed the Board of his intention to 
bring to it a proposal for the merger of Colleges I and II on the 
Boston campus. He explained that the process of implementing the 
priorities for the Boston campus established by the Trustees had 
inevitably led to a consideration of the internal structure of the 
campus. He assured the Board that extensive and full consultation 
with the faculty would take place before he brought any proposal to 
the Board. 

President Wood next called on Chancellor Bulger of the 
Worcester campus. Chancellor Bulger expressed his satisfaction at 
assuming his duties on February 1, and related an experience which 
he said was revealing about his new position. He and his family 
were sampling various rides at Disney World in Florida. They en- 
countered one ride, called "Space Mountain," which he felt was a 
parallel for his immediate future — a roller-coaster ride in total 
darkness. Fortunately, he said, they came through the ride without 
mishap. He then asked former Acting Dean Butcher to address the 
Board. 



2-4-76 



Approval of 
Minutes of Pre- 
vious Meetings 



Remarks of the 
President 

Crispell Report 
(Doc. T76-050) 



Opening of Hos- 
pital 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 

UM/Boston — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



_ 






2-4-76 

Future of Medical 
School 



TRUSTEE 



Report of Execu- 
tive Committee 

Revision to By- 
laws 
(Doc. T73-031) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Butcher began by expressing his pleasure at "moving 
from the kitchen to the dining room" at the Medical School. He then 
alluded to reports in the press of the intention of the Governor's 
Management Task Force to recommend the closing of the Medical School 
and the Hospital. He said that reports of such recommendations had 
an immediate negative impact and would severely compromise recruit- 
ing and the morale of the staff which had worked so hard to open the 
Hospital. He said he had actually received calls from patients 
asking where they should go now that the Hospital was to be closed. 
This institution, he said, should be given a chance to succeed. 

Governor Dukakis said he hoped this would be the last time 
he would have to address this issue. He said he did not need to re- 
affirm his feelings on the issue, and added that there was no dis- 
agreement around the table about the need for, and fundamental 
mission of, the Medical School. Of course, he and all the Trustees 
must be concerned about the cost, and the sooner the Hospital could 
be placed on as near a self-sustaining basis as possible, the better 
He said further that he hoped his fundamental position was clear, 
and that we could now proceed to make the Medical Center something 
to be proud of. 

As for the so-called recommendations of the Governor's 
Task Force, he stressed that there are no recommendations and will 
not be for several weeks or months. This Task Force will have hun- 
dreds of recommendations across the spectrum of state government, 
he said, and recommendations are merely that — they are not policy. 
The Task Force's recommendations will be reviewed on their merits: 
some will be accepted and some rejected, but the Medical School and 
the Hospital clearly have the support of the Legislature and the 
Administration. The recommendations rumored in the press were 
nothing to worry about. The Republican minority in the Legislature, 
he pointed out, proposes the closing of the Medical School every 
week or so. He concluded by saying that he will deal with the issue 
in a positive and constructive way. 

President Wood commented that such statements by the Gov- 
ernor were probably the most effective way to counter this kind of 
press rumor. 

Chairman Healey turned to the reports of the standing Com- 
mittees. The first item to be presented by the Executive Committee 
was a series of proposed changes in the Trustee By-laws (Doc. T73- 
031). One would incorporate into the By-laws the Committee on 
Health Affairs established by the Board at its December meeting, and 
the other would merge the Committees on Budget and Finance. The 
Board had received drafts of other changes to be taken up at the 
March meeting, and they were encouraged to send their comments to 
the Secretary prior to the meeting. A motion was made and seconded, 
and it was 



I 



TRUSTEE 



! 



I 



4041 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To strike the words "(4) Committee on Finance; 

(5) Committee on the Budget" as appearing in 
Article III, Section 1 of T73-031 and insert 
in lieu thereof the following language: — 

(4) Committee on Budget and Finance; (5) Com- 
mittee on Health Affairs. 

VOTED : To strike the words "The Committee on the Budget, 
and the Committee on Finance" as appearing in 
Article III, Section 4 (b) of T73-031 and insert 
in lieu thereof the following language: — and the 
Committee on Budget and Finance. 

VOTED : To strike Sections 9 and 11 of Article III, as 

appearing in T73-031, and insert in lieu thereof 
the following language: — 

SECTION 9. THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE. 
The Committee on Budget and Finance shall have the 
following powers and duties : 

(a) To consider general policies relating to the 
formulation of budgets and the compensation 
policies for the several campuses and the Uni- 
versity administration, and to make recommenda- 
tions to the Board of Trustees with respect 
thereto. 

(b) To consider and act upon operating budget re- 
quests and capital outlay budget requests sub- 
mitted by the several campuses and to make rec- 
ommendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto. 

(c) To review proposals for the transfer of funds 
between subsidiary accounts, and to make recom- 
mendations to the Board of Trustees with respect 
thereto . 

(d) To consider policies on annual merit increases 
and personnel staffing patterns, and to make 
recommendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto. 

(e) To enlist and advance the cooperation and partic 
ipation of the Board of Trustees in facilitating 
favorable action on the University budget by 
the General Court and the Executive department 
of the Commonwealth, and to make recommendations 
to the Board of Trustees with respect thereto. 



(f) To consider policies and other matters pertainin|g 
to the investment of the endowment funds and 



2-4-76 



4042 



2-4-76 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

other funds of the University that may from time 
to time be invested and reinvested, and to make 
recommendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto . 

(g) To consider and act upon proposals by the Trea- 
surer for action which the Board of Trustees may 
have generally or specifically authorized the 
Treasurer to take regarding the investment port- 
folio of the University with the concurrence 
of the Committee on Budget and Finance. 

(h) To review the financial records and controls of 
the University; to review and develop policies 
respecting the receipt, management and disburse- 
ment of funds of the University from whatever 
source received, the purchase of services, sup- 
plies and materials, and internal controls over 
the same; to review proposals for tuition, fees, 
rents and charges; to consider policies and 
other matters pertaining to the leasing of pri- 
vate property by the University; to review 
audits of financial activities of the University 
and to report thereon; and to make recommenda- 
tions with respect thereto to the Board of 
Trustees . 

(i) To consider the fidelity and performance bond- 
ing of University personnel and to report there- 
on, and to make recommendations with respect 
thereto to the Board of Trustees. 

( j ) To review plans and programs to raise private 
funds for the University through special gifts, 
endowments, bequests and other means, and to 
make recommendations to the Board of Trustees 
with respect thereto. 

VOTED: To amend Article III of T73-031 by inserting the fol- 
lowing new section: — 

SECTION 11. THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS. The 
Committee on Health Affairs shall have the following 
powers and duties: 

(a) To review, consider, and make recommendations 
with respect to the health care and delivery 
systems of the University Medical Center at 
Worcester, including cooperative arrangements 
with State agencies and medical institutions. 

(b) To review and consider recommendations from the 
Hospital Management Board. 



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TRUSTEE 



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\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item was a proposed Peninsula Development Trust 
Fund (Doc. T76-041) for the purpose of handling certain expenses 
relating to the planning and construction of the Kennedy Library as 
well as for possible further development at Columbia Point. There 
was no discussion and, upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish a Peninsula Development Trust Fund for 
the purpose of providing for expenses related to 
the planning and construction of the John F. 
Kennedy Library and other development at the 
Columbia Point Peninsula. All expenditures from 
said trust fund shall be subject to the approval 
of the Chancellor of the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston and the concurrence of the Presi- 
dent of the University. Further, that the sum of 
$7,500 be transferred to said trust fund from the 
Trustee Reserve Trust Fund Interest Account. 



4043 



2-4-76 



UM/Boston — 
Peninsula Develop- 
ment Trust Fund 
(Doc. T76-041) 



Personnel Policy 
for Professional 



Nonacademic Staff 



The next matter in the Executive Committee report was the 
Reinstatement of the Provisions relating to Multi-Year Contracts in 
the Personnel Policy for Professional Nonacademic Staff (Docs. T73- 
090R, T76-040). These provisions had been eliminated from the policjy (Docs. T73-090R, 
during the budget crisis of the last year, but that action had caused T76-040) 
serious problems on the campus. Sufficient knowledge of fiscal 
levels now exist with the adoption of the FY 1976 Operating Budget 
and the FY 1977 Budget request to allow these provisions to be re- 
instated retroactive to June 25, 1975. There was no objection and, 
upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That, upon the request of the President, as set 
forth in T76-040, the Board of Trustees rein- 
state, retroactive to June 25, 1975, the pro- 
visions of the Personnel Policy for Professional 
Non-academic Staff (T73-090R) concerning multi- 
year contracts. 

This completed the report of the Executive Committee, and 
Chairman Healey called on Chairman Carlson for the report of the 
Budget Committee. Trustee Carlson presented the FY 1976 Operating 
Budget Summary (Doc. T76-039) . Reporting on the Budget Committee 
meeting of January 21, Trustee Carlson relayed the difficulties 
described by campus representatives of living within the available 
funds while endeavoring to maintain the quality of instruction. 
One of the anomalous situations, he said, was the requirement that 
the campuses receive executive branch approval through the critical 
needs procedure in order to fill critical vacancies. 

Two notable developments in the Budget described by 
Trustee Carlson were: 



Report of Budget 
Committee 



FY 1976 Operating 



Budget 

(Doc. T76-039) 



4044 



2-4-76 



TRUSTEE 



FY 1977 Mainte - 
nance Budget Re- 
quest 
(Doc. T76-033) 



Committee on Long- 
Range Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

— Segregation of certain University-wide services into 
a separate category supported by contributions from 
all three campuses. The new classification will pro- 
vide a more accurate reflection of support costs on 
all campuses. 

— The separation for the first time of the Hospital 
appropriation from the Medical School appropriation. 
Although the Hospital appropriation was $5.5 million, 
the University had agreed to spend no more than $3.5 
million, plus $720,000 in expected revenue. 

Trustee Carlson reported that Secretary Parks had expressed 
a concern at the January 7 meeting of the Executive Committee about 
carefully controlling the costs of the Hospital. In an effort to 
allay this concern, which he said was shared by all Trustees, Trust- 
ee Carlson made a motion which he said would serve this purpose. 
The motion was seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To reaffirm the commitment of the Board of Trustees 
to the objective of limiting the net cost of the 
University Hospital to the Commonwealth to $3.5 
million for FY 1976. Further, to assure that the 
expenditure plan as set forth in the Operating Bud- 
get (Doc. T76-039) will carry out that objective. 
Further, to direct the Chancellor of the Worcester 
campus and the Senior Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs to jointly review the expendi- 
tures and revenue of that campus periodically on a 
monthly basis, and to report to the Chairman of 
the Committee on Budget and Finance any adjustments 
to the Operating Budget needed to conform to the 
commitment made in October, 1975. 

Trustee Carlson then proposed that the Board approve the 
FY 1976 Operating Budget. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the University of Massachusetts Oper- 
ating Budget for Fiscal Year 1976 as summarized 
in Trustee Document T76-039. 

The Committee had next discussed the status of the FY 
1977 Maintenance Budget Request (Doc. T76-033) . Although both the 
BHE and executive recommendations are lower than that of the Board, 
the Committee continues to believe that the request as submitted is 
realistic and that a lower figure would seriously impair the Uni- 
versity's ability to maintain high standards of education. 

Chairman Healey called on Trustee Rowland for the Report 
of the Committee on Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland reported 
that the Committee had spent its January 7 meeting discussing and 



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TRUSTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommending a statement and guidelines for enrollment on the Am- 
herst campus. The guidelines for the Amherst campus are basically 
similar to those adopted for the Boston campus; there are two im- 
portant new elements, however: 

— whereas the Boston campus anticipates further 
development, the Amherst campus is assumed to 
be at full size. 

— While setting a limit on graduate enrollment , the 
new guidelines will make explicit reference to the 
special mission of the Amherst campus with regard 
to graduate education. 

Trustee Rowland observed that the enrollment ceilings are 
about five percent higher than present enrollment and allow for nec- 
essary adjustments and future contingencies. She called attention 
to the Long-Range Planning Committee minutes in which it was made 
clear that the numbers were ceilings and not targets. 

Trustee Rowland endorsed President Wood's commendation of 
the members of the Long-Range Planning Committee, of Chancellor 
Bromery and his staff, of the Program and Budget Council, and of 
Vice President Robinson and Assistant Vice President Cooley for 
their respective contributions. She described the guidelines as a 
significant step in the efforts of the Trustees to establish a 
planning framework within which the University can proceed. 

Secretary Parks asked whether this document would mean 
that the University would be turning students away. He was informed 
that the University has had to do so for some time; applications 
always far exceed available spaces. Secretary Parks then stated 
that he believed that this statement should contain within it a 
list of priorities for the acceptance of students, so that students 
would not simply gain access on a first-come-first-served basis. 
Chancellor Bromery said that the mission of the public University 
was to serve the needs of those students who would not normally be 
able to attend private institutions. In his ten years at the Uni- 
versity, students had never been accepted on a first-come-first- 
served basis. 

Trustee Carlson pointed out the difficulty of establish- 
ing criteria for determining need which can be precisely interpreted 
Secretary Parks said, however, that he believed figures were avail- 
able and that there were means of categorizing students for the pur- 
pose of setting priorities. He further contended that the average 
income of students at the University does not reflect its mission 
as Chancellor Bromery described it. 

Vice President Robinson described the ways in which the 
guidelines would increase access to community college students, and 



4045 



2-4-76 

UM/Amherst — 
Enrollment 
Guidelines 
(Doc. T76-044) 



4046 



2-4-76 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

she pointed out that the Trustees had always properly left admissions 
policy to the faculty as their area of special competence. Trustee 
Robertson commented that the University is a part of a total system 
of higher education and that in addition to the various types of 
public institutions, we must recognize the enrollment needs and 
opportunities of the private institutions of higher education. 
President Wood added that setting enrollment guidelines was an 
interplay of a complex set of forces, including overall demand, and 
pointed out that the emphasis of the statement was a concern for 
the nontraditional college students and not the 18-to-20-year-old 
group. He said, further, that the University's policies in this 
area must mesh with those of the state and community colleges as 
well as institutions in the private sector. Finally, he said the 
University must be as concerned with the quality of education given 
as with who has access to it; the sixties have shown that the dis- 
appointment at receiving an inferior education is greater than that 
of not gaining automatic access. 

Trustee Eddy expressed her gratification that the planning 
statement reflected a concern for the effects of growth on the 
Pioneer Valley, since the rate of growth and the undergraduate- 
graduate mix were of great concern and importance to the environment 
and economy of the region. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That the Board of Trustees adopt the following 
policy statement and policy guidelines on en- 
rollment at the University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst, subject to continuing review by the 
President and the Board of Trustees in con- 
sultation with the Chancellor and the campus 
community : 

"For more than four years the Trustees have been concerned 
with the appropriate size and distribution of enrollment at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Amherst . During that period, reductions 
in statewide enrollment projections, changing patterns of graduate 
school demand and prospects, shifts in the undergraduate profile 
and growing concern for environmental impacts have reinforced the 
importance of this review and the modification of early assumptions 
of continued and even unlimited growth. 

"The Trustees consider the Amherst Campus to have reached 
full size and assume that shifting demands and new program direction(s 
at both the graduate and undergraduate level will be accommodated 
through the careful reallocation of resources, including existing 
academic facilities. The Trustees reaffirm the University's respon- 
sibility for high quality graduate education within the public 
sector and consider this to be a major and vital mission of the 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst. Meeting this commitment, how- 
ever, does not require the continued expansion of graduate enroll- 
ment or an enlarged proportion of graduate students in on-campus 



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404? 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 2-4-76 

programs. By not including off-campus programs within the enroll- 
ment ceiling the Trustees intend to encourage further development 
of non-traditional programs, particularly at the graduate level. 
Protecting the opportunity for innovation will, of course, be 
particularly difficult in a time of budgetary constraints. 

"The Board of Trustees accepts the following enrollment 
guidelines for the University of Massachusetts/Amherst : 

1. An overall enrollment ceiling of 23,500 FTE and 
26,500 headcount students is established for the 
Amherst campus . This ceiling applies to all on- 
campus graduate and undergraduate students re- 
gardless of classification. 

2. On-campus FTE graduate enrollment should not ex- 
ceed 14% of total on-campus FTE enrollment. 

3. In order to accommodate the increasing demand for 
transfer opportunity, the undergraduate FTE enroll- 
ment should include 40% lower division and 60% 
upper division students. 

4. The Amherst campus should seek to increase educa- 
tional opportunities for part-time, older, and 
other non-traditional students through regular 
on-campus as well as off-campus programs. 

5. The Amherst campus should be encouraged to develop 
off-campus programs in several carefully selected 
fields, especially at a master's level, with the 
acknowledgement that off-campus graduate programs 
will require a careful reexamination of existing 
policies and procedures regarding full-time study 
requirements and student fees. 

6. Enrollment in the Division of Continuing Education 
is currently under review and the present enroll- 
ment is not reflected in the projections; however, 
no significant change in size is contemplated until 
the review is completed. 

7. The method for computing FTE and the definition of 
other appropriate enrollment terms (i.e. on-campus, 
off-campus, full-time, part-time, lower division, 
upper division) shall be established by the Planning 
Office in consultation with the respective campuses.' 

The Chairman then called on Trustee Troy for the report Committee on Fac- 
of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy ulty and Educa- 
explained that his report of the November 19 meeting of the Committee tional Policy 



4048 



2-4-76 

Centralization of 
University 



TRUSTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Graduation Lists 
(Doc. T76-042) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

should have been made at the previous Board meeting, but due to the 
length of that meeting, he postponed his report. The meeting had 
been taken up largely with reports of the faculty representatives 
on faculty views of centralization of the University. Professors 
Marshall and Wilkinson, of the Boston and Amherst campuses respec- 
tively, he said, relayed the views of their faculties that further 
centralization of the University distances the administration from 
the teaching process and reduces necessary autonomy. Professor 
Hittelman of the Worcester campus explained that, since that campus 
did not have a governance system as yet, further discussion and 
study of the document known as the Hay Report would be necessary 
before the faculty could comment on it intelligently. 

Trustee Troy reported that President Wood had called 
attention to the repeated efforts to explain and discuss the Hay 
Report with the campuses and to his press conference in which he 
had made the report a matter of public record. It was vital, he 
said, to separate the recommendations of the Hay Report from actual 
implementation. For example, the position of Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs had not originated with the Hay 
Report but had been created by the Trustees on the recommendation 
of a study group chaired by Father Walsh. 

Trustee Troy noted that several Trustees had expressed 
differing views on the issue of centralization: Trustee Croce 
quoted Clark Kerr as saying that centralization was more necessary 
in a time of shrinking resources, while Trustee Morgenthau said 
the opposite view could be defended with equally respectable 
evidence . 

At Trustee Morgenthau' s suggestion, the three faculties 
agreed to set up committees to review the issue in depth and to 
make formal reports to the Committee at its March meeting. Trustee 
Troy said he hoped these reports would be concise and specific. 

In concluding his report on this discussion, Trustee Troy 
remarked that whatever virtues the Hay Report had, it had one seri- 
ous weakness: it lacked a clear, precise prose style. In places 
it was dense and almost impenetrable, and he suggested that the mis- 
understandings which had arisen over it should serve as a lesson 
in the advantages of a liberal university education. 

Trustee Troy then turned to the proposed approval of 

the Preliminary Graduation Lists for February at UM/Amherst (Doc. 

T76-042) . There was no discussion and upon motion made and seconded 
it was 

VOTED: To approve and ratify the preliminary graduation 
lists of February, 1976, UM/Amherst, as certified 
by the recorder of that campus and as set forth 
in Doc. T76-042. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This completed the reports of the standing committees, 
and the Chairman again called on Trustee Rowland to report in her 
capacity as Chairman of the Nominating Committee. Trustee Rowland 
reported that the Committee had met and worked out Committee assign- 
ments, and she said that she believed that the assignments repre- 
sented the best possible reconciliation of the needs of the Com- 
mittees and the interests and abilities of Trustees. She said she 
was gratified that there had been no objections expressed to the 
nominations. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



To confirm and approve the following Officers 
of the Board of Trustees, together with Com- 
mittee assignments, for the period February 
1976 to the annual meeting in 1977, as follows 



Chairman 
Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 



Joseph P. Healey 
Gladys Keith Hardy 
Dorothy K. Eichel 



The delegate to the Board of Higher Education 
and the Committee assignments for 1976-77 are 
as contained in Document T76-043. 

Chairman Healey expressed his appreciation to the Trustees 
for choosing him to serve for another year as Chairman. 

The last item on the formal agenda was the report of the 
Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Troy reported 
in his capacity as delegate, describing a state of flux in the 
Board because of resignations and retirements. However, he said 
the Board was fortunate in having Chancellor Keith, an able, re- 
sourceful and knowledgeable person who is managing well in diffi- 
cult circumstances. 

The Board had voted to file legislation to reorganize it- 
self in terms of size and representation. Segmental representation 
would be eliminated and the membership would be reduced from twelve 
to eleven. 

Finally, the Board had recommended a total budget for 
higher education for FY 1977 of $258 million — $27 million less than 
the institutions asked for, but $20 million more than the Executive 
recommendation in House I. This completed Trustee Troy's report. 

Chairman Healey recognized Mr. Patrick Walker of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Tenants Association, who read a statement 
saying that the UMTA had been on a rent strike against the Univer- 
sity in an effort to take over the management of married students 
housing. He said he had met with the Chairman, Chancellor Bromery 
and President Wood that morning, and that there appeared to be a 
procedure now for outstanding issues to be resolved. He told the 
Trustees that they would have to make a great effort to understand 
the complicated issues involved, and he said he hoped they would 



4049 



2-4-76 

Report of 

Nominating 

Committee 



Report of Dele- 
gate to Board 
of Higher Educa- 
tion 



UMTA Statement 



4050 



2-4-76 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

substantiate their expressions of support by helping to get the 
problems resolved and the proposal acted upon. 

Counsel Searson was recognized, and he disputed an allega- 
tion in a letter sent to the Trustees by the UMTA that the Office 
of the General Counsel had not acted on the legal issues as promised 
He described the efforts undertaken by his office on these issues, 
including the drafting of two legal memoranda. 

There was no further business to come before the Board, 
and the meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



^fcladyl Keith Hardy 



idyg Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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PRESENT: 






4051 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

March 3, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Gavin, 
Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, 
Shaler, Spiller, and Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig, Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Parks 
representing Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Ms. Judd and Ms. Rasmussen, 
Office of the Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent : Trustees Abrams , Eddy, Fielding, Okin and Shearer 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Mr. Eller, Associate 
Vice President for University Policy; Ms. Frankel, Staff Assis- 
tant for Management and Business Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget 
Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant for Budget; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Physical Planning; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; 
Mr. Melley, Director of Public Affairs 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director 
of Budget and Control; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Freeland, Dean of College IV; Mr. Larner, Director 
of Public Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Hittelman, Faculty 
Representative 

Guests : Ms. Muriel Snowden, former Trustee; from Northeastern 
University: President Ryder, Vice President Hekemian, Acting 
Dean Phillip Crotty, Dean Kenneth Ballou; Ms. Susan Tehan, 
Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. Leroy Keith, Chan- 
cellor of Higher Education 

The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m. Chairman 
Healey presented the minutes of the previous meeting. There 
were no amendments and, upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
February 4, 1976. 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous Meeting 



4052 



Board 
3-3-76 



Former Trustees 
Snowden and 
Weldon 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman recognized Trustee Rowland, who made the 
following statement: 

"I asked the Chairman if I could have the honor of pre- 
senting this motion today as a matter of personal privilege. I 
have had the greatest respect for Muriel Snowden and her achieve- 
ments for many years, and so was very pleased to learn of her 
appointment as Trustee of this University in 1969. From the time 
of her first meeting, I like to think we established a special 
bond of friendship and concern for the University. The abrupt 
termination of her service leaves me with a sense of personal 
as well as institutional loss. In this respect, I am sure I 
speak for many others on the Board. Muriel Snowden is a beautiful 
and extraordinary person. I am pleased, Mr. Chairman, to offer 
the following resolution: 

'Muriel Snowden has devoted her life to the 
problems of the less powerful and the disad- 
vantaged. As co-founder and co-director of 
Freedom House, she has served the needs of 
the Roxbury community for more than twenty- 
five years. An imposing array of citations 
and awards attest to the breadth of her in- 
terests and quality of her public service. 

1 The University of Massachusetts has been 
deeply fortunate to share in this lifetime of 
service. In her seven years as a member of 
the Board of Trustees, she has worked with the 
Student Affairs, Faculty and Educational Policy, 
and Long-Range Planning Committees. During the 
tense period preceding the opening of the new 
campus at Columbia Point, she gave important 
help and counsel as chairperson of the Ad Hoc 
Committee on University-Community Relations. 
Not only did the campus open without incident, 
but a foundation was laid for a strong and 
positive relationship between the campus and 
its neighbors. 

1 Ms . Snowden has brought to her work on the 
Board not only intelligence and discernment 
but an intense human perspective. She has 
challenged us to consider the effect of any 
action on people and particularly on the stu- 
dents who are at the heart of our enterprise. 
Her personal commitments are strong, but her 
concern and humanity extend well beyond race, 
sex, age or income. She has invited us all 
to adopt a broad and serious view of our 
responsibilities. Muriel's wit, charm and 
wisdom will be sorely missed. The University 
and the Commonwealth are in her debt. '" 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the resolution of appreciation for 
the service of Muriel S. Snowden. 

Chairman Healey recognized Ms. Snowden, who described 
the "buddy system" which had operated between her and Trustee 
Rowland. Trustee Rowland took her in tow, she said, and helped 
her through so much. 

Ms. Snowden thanked all the Trustees and faculty mem- 
bers of the University who had sent many warm and kind letters. 
She admitted that there had been a period during January when 
she had wondered about her service as Trustee. She said she had 
thought that her service had been in the interests of the greater 
University, but particularly in the interests of black students, 
black faculty and women. It was not the lack of reappointment 
itself, she said, but the manner in which it was done: she 
felt as if she had been unceremoniously dumped, and she suggested 
that this had serious political implications. She added that the 
public schools of the City of Boston were reaping the whirlwind 
of too much politics in education. 

The mission of public education, she said, whether 
elementary or higher, was to provide options for people who might 
not otherwise have the opportunity to have access to an education 

Ms. Snowden also expressed great concern about the 
future of lay trusteeship. Her term had been an education to 
her, and she said that as many people on the outside as possible 
should have the opportunity to come to understand the inner 
workings of a major University. She called lay participation a 
strength of the University, and spoke of the warmth and harmony 
which existed among Board members of different backgrounds and 
points of view. 

She said, finally, that she would treasure the resolu- 
tion of appreciation along with the honorary degree, and she 
said she would never be an uncritical lover but a loving critic. 

The Chairman next recognized Trustee Gordon to present 
a resolution of appreciation for Trustee Christopher J. Weldon. 
Trustee Gordon said he was honored to read the following resolu- 
tion because of his admiration for Bishop Weldon 's fourteen 
years of service: 

"Once again the Board of Trustees is saddened 
by the departure of one of its senior members. 
To those of us who remember when Bishop Weldon 
joined this Board, it seems impossible that 
fourteen years have passed. In all that time 
he has never ceased, in his firm but quiet way, 



4053 



Board 
3-3-76 



4 54 



Board 
3-3-76 



President ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to reflect on the pressing issues he has 
faced and to focus on them his keen intel- 
ligence and his best judgment. 

"Back in 1962 when the General Court and 
the Governor asked the University of Massa- 
chusetts to build a medical school, the Board 
of Trustees was indeed fortunate to have him 
with us. For he brought to this enterprise 
a wide and varied experience in the problems 
of medical care and delivery, which he had 
learned as Bishop of Springfield. He also 
brought a deep and compassionate sense of what 
a publicly-supported and publicly-committed 
medical school would mean over the years to 
the people of the Commonwealth. 

"Again and again in the midst of arduous 
and tangled discussions we have heard the 
cool and reasonable voice of the Bishop 
lending a refreshing tone of perspective 
where it was sorely needed. He was articu- 
late, he was experienced, and his was the 
position of one who always wanted to know 
how a decision would affect people. In his 
service to several Trustee Committees, in- 
cluding the Committees on Faculty and Edu- 
cational Policy, Finance, and the Executive 
Committee, Bishop Weldon's enthusiasm, judg- 
ment and concern for a great resource of the 
Commonwealth never slacked or varied. There- 
fore, all of us who served with him, both in 
the recent past and over the long haul, join 
in expressing our gratitude and appreciation 
for his past and our best wishes for his 
future." 

The motion was seconded, and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt the resolution of appreciation for 
Trustee Christopher J. Weldon 

Chairman Healey asked all present to stand in an ex- 
pression of appreciation for the Bishop's service. The Chairman 
added his personal endorsement of the sentiments expressed by 
the resolutions, and said that he was certain the new Trustees 
would carry out their responsibilities in accordance with the 
best traditions of trusteeship. 

The next matter was the Presidential Agenda, the 
principal item on which was a cooperative agreement in Management 
with Northeastern University. Before recognizing President Wood, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

however, the Chairman said that he wished to express the Univer- 
sity's recognition of the great -services to the Commonwealth 
carried out by the private sector of higher education. No one, 
he said, had been more interested over the past several years 
in furthering cooperative arrangements between the University 
and the private universities than President Wood. He then 
called on the President. 

President Wood said that he felt greatly honored by the 
presence of President Ryder and his colleagues from Northeastern 
University. Although the Trustees had had a policy calling for 
inter-University cooperation for many years, there had not been 
a program until now. In 1972 he had stated that the University 
stood ready to enter into such agreements, but it was not until 
November 1974 that legal counsel advised that questions about 
their propriety had been eliminated by the constitutional amend- 
ment removing the prohibition of state funds to private higher 
education. Chancellor Golino and Dean Richard Freeland of the 
College of Professional Studies had seized upon this opportunity 
to complete the negotiations with Northeastern, and for this 
he wished to express his admiration and gratitude toward them 
and toward his colleagues at Northeastern. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the agreement (Doc. T76-046) 
negotiated between the administration of 
the Boston campus and Northeastern Uni- 
versity for a cooperative program in 
management allowing UMass/Boston students 
to enroll in advanced elective courses in 
management at Northeastern which are not 
currently offered at UMass/Boston; further, 
to authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity and the Chancellor of the Boston cam- 
pus to execute said agreement. 

President Wood called on Chancellor Golino, who in 
turn thanked President Ryder and his colleagues for taking time 
out of a busy schedule to be here for this occasion. Chancellor 
Golino said that this agreement had one primary purpose: to 
enrich the opportunities of students attending UM/Boston. Stu- 
dents at UM/Boston in the College of Professional Studies would 
be able to take advanced courses at the School of Business Ad- 
ministration at Northeastern University. These courses would 
be available to UM/Boston students as part of their regular pro- 
gram and would be covered by their standard tuition payment. 
The University would reimburse Northeastern directly. 

This program was not to be a substitute for the devel- 
opment of a sound management program at UM/Boston, but was meant 
to supplement with elective courses in specialized fields the 
basic work done at the Harbor Campus. It would help both sides, 



4055 



Board 
3-3-76 



Agreement with 
Northeastern 
University 
(Doc. T76-046) 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



4056 



Board 
3-3-76 



President 
Ryder ' s Remarks 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he said: it would help UM/Boston because it would enable the 
University to develop a management program without having to 
hire faculty to cover all specialties, and it would help North- 
eastern because it would earn public support by the provision 
of services to students of the Commonwealth, a goal sought by 
many private universities in the Boston area. 

This agreement was the culmination of many months of 
work on the part of Dean Freeland and Professor Patterson at 
UM/Boston and of Vice President Hekemian and Dean Crotty at 
Northeastern University. Finally, he said the program had been 
helped along by significant support by senior administrators on 
both campuses, particularly President Wood and President Ryder. 

It would have been easy, said Chancellor Golino, for 
this agreement never to have happened. It would have been easy 
for UM/Boston to have insisted on a complete faculty and all the 
attendant resources to provide the specialties involved in a 
program in management. It would have been easy for Northeastern 
University to have avoided joining with a University which it 
has had occasion to regard as a competitor. The fact that this 
agreement had been consummated, however, pointed the way toward 
further agreements of this kind, and toward a new relationship 
between public and private institutions in Massachusetts. 

The Chairman recognized President Ryder. President 
Ryder said that as the new President of Northeastern University, 
he had committed himself to the realization of the dawning of 
a new day. A decade and a half of expansion was over, he said, 
and in this era of stabilizing enrollments and rising costs, 
the public and private sectors must join together to make the 
best use of faculty and resources. Both public and private 
should lay aside conflicts, he said, and keep in mind that the 
interests of the students of the Commonwealth are at stake. The 
important goal is to offer students the greatest possible variety 
of options at the lowest possible cost, both to them and to the 
Commonwealth. He hoped that this would also herald the beginning 
of cooperation among private institutions. 

President Wood next called on Chancellor Bromery of 
the Amherst campus. Chancellor Bromery reported first the estab- 
lishment of forty $500 alumni scholarships to both incoming and 
presently enrolled students, to be awarded on the basis of 
academic merit. 

Second, he announced a two-day series of programs on 
March 11 and 12 to commemorate the centennial of the visit in 
1876 of President Clark of Massachusetts Agricultural College 
to Japan. President Clark, he said, is considered to be the 
father of agricultural education in Japan. 

Finally, the Amherst campus School of Landscape Archi- 
tecture had just received a five-year accreditation. He said 



I 



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1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

this was a point of particular pride to the campus, because the 
UM/Amherst School of Landscape Architecture was considered to 
be one of the best in the country. 

The President next called on Chancellor Bulger of the 
Worcester campus. Chancellor Bulger reported that the Medical 
School would receive an accreditation visit this month from the 
Liaison Committee on Medical Education of the American Medical. 
Association and the American Association of Medical Colleges. 
He explained that new institutions are visited rather frequently, 
but when they have reached a certain stage of development they 
are considered for a four-year accreditation. This visit was 
for such an accreditation. 

Second, Chancellor Bulger reported that he would be 
able to give the Board a report at its next meeting on the pro- 
file and breakdowns of the entering class of medical students 
for 1976. The selection process, he said, would be completed 
this month. Third, he described his enthusiasm for the Worcester 
Consortium of educational institutions. He said the Consortium 
was anxious to begin various cooperative arrangements, particu- 
larly in the area of allied health. This was now possible with 
the opening of the Hospital. Fourth, the patient census of the 
Hospital was running at a rate of about 35 patients per day, 
which he said was ahead of expectations, and he said the Hospital 
would soon be placing more beds into service. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the report of the Execu- 
tive Committee, and asked Trustee Carlson to report on the first 
item, a proposed Fund Transfer for the Worcester campus. Trustee 
Carlson reported that, as in any new institution, it had been 
difficult to plan the Hospital's account distribution. As a 
result of the supply consumption experienced by the University 
Hospital in its first several weeks of operation, it appeared 
necessary to effect a fund transfer from the 02 and 08 accounts 
into the 07 account to purchase supplies. Secretary Parks asked 
whether there would still be a surplus in the 02 and 08 accounts, 
and he was told that remaining funds would cover needs for the 
rest of the fiscal year. Trustee Carlson pointed out that there 
was under way on the campus a complete review of the account 
distribution which would be ready for presentation to the May 
meeting of the Board of Trustees. A motion was made and seconded 
and it was 

VOTED : To approve and authorize the transfer of 

$250,000 requested by the Worcester campus 
to meet additional needs for the purchase of 
medical and surgical supplies essential for 
the care of patients at University Hospital. 
The funds to be transferred into subsidiary 
account 07 shall be from subsidiary account 
02 in the amount of $150,000 and from sub- 
sidiary 08 in the amount of $100,000. 



4 057 



Board 
3-3-76 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

UM/Worcester— 
Fund Transfer 



4 58 



Board 
3-3-76 

By-laws of the 
Board of 
Trustees 
(Docs. T73-031, 
T76-051) 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Bud- 
get and Finance 

Investment 
Report 



Robert J. 
McCartney En- 
dowment Fund 



Trust Fund 
Interest 

Critical Needs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next presented the revised By-laws of 
the Board of Trustees (Docs. T73-031, T76-051) . He explained 
that the changes proposed were of a minor nature, and he recalled 
that the Board had received the draft at the February meeting 
to provide adequate time for review and comment. Extensive 
discussion of the amendments having taken place at the Executive 
Committee meeting that morning, there was no further comment and, 
upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To rescind the present Trustee By-laws 
(Doc. T73-031) and adopt the revised 
Trustee By-laws (Doc. T76-051) . 

Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Carlson of the 
Committee on Budget and Finance for his report. Trustee Carlson 
first reported that the Committee had heard a report on invest- 
ment policy from its investment counsel, Mr. John Wood of 
Standish, Ayer & Wood, and had accordingly authorized Treasurer 
Johnson to carry out certain adjustments in the investment port- 
folio of the University. 

The next item was the proposed Establishment of the 
Robert J. McCartney Endowment Fund at UM/Amherst. Chairman 
Healey said he could think of no more fitting memorial to Bob 
McCartney and, upon a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Robert J. McCartney Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund for Orphans be established as an 
Endowment Fund for the purpose of making an- 
nually one or more awards to the nearest $100.00 
from income earned during the preceding fiscal 
year to aid industrious and deserving students 
enrolled at any campus of the University. Selec- 
tion of recipients shall be made by the campus 
committees on scholarships and financial aid 
and reviewed by the Treasurer of the University 
and by the Vice President for Management and 
Business Affairs or as the Board of Trustees may 
from time to time direct. Awards shall be made 
to needy and deserving students who do not have 
parents; he or she shall also be born in Massa- 
chusetts and be a permanent resident thereof 
for a period of one year prior to the academic 
period for which the grant is made. Unused in- 
come remaining after annual awards have been 
made shall be added to the principal of the 
fund at the close of the fiscal year. 

Continuing his report, Trustee Carlson said the Com- 
mittee heard reports on the status of the Trustee Trust Fund 
Interest account, of the status of current developments in the 
critical needs process, and of the problems created by the 
unique position of the University with respect to the filling 
of critical needs positions. Chancellor Bromery had then given 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a report to the Committee on program changes under consideration 
on the Amherst campus and had described a new program budgeting 
approach which helped to develop the program changes contemplated;. 

The next item in Trustee Carlson's report was a pro- 
posal for Permanent Financing of the Campus Center at UM/ Amherst 
(Doc. T76-047) . Treasurer Johnson had engaged in careful study 
over many months and had presented this proposal which the Com- 
mittee had discussed and concluded to be sound. Trustee Gavin 
had expressed certain reservations about the proposed inclusion 
of a commercial bank rental among the revenue-producing plans 
in the proposal, but it had been agreed that this matter could 
be resolved separately from that of permanent financing. 

Trustee Gavin was recognized, and she reiterated the 
three points made by a letter circulated to the Trustees: First, 
that the students were opposed to the proposal for a commercial 
bank in the Campus Center and that they understood the proposal 
to be inactive at this time. Second, that any changes in the 
Campus Center management should be submitted to student governing 
bodies for their approval. Third, that the students sought a 
clarification of the powers of the Campus Center Board of Gov- 
ernors, which would be elected for the first time on March 8. 

Chairman Healey asked for further clarification of the 
bank proposal. Chancellor Bromery recalled that he had told 
Trustee Gavin that discussions on this matter were still in pro- 
gress, and that any agreement would be discussed with the Campus 
Center Board of Governors. The Board of Governors had approved 
a commercial bank a year ago, he said, and the campus adminis- 
tration had gone on to solicit bids for the bank. He said he 
had not known about any opposition to it until the permanent 
financing proposal came before the Budget and Finance Committee. 
As a result of that opposition, however, the proposal had been 
tabled pending further discussion. The Chancellor pointed out 
that there was a $24,000 item in the Campus Center Budget which 
would have to be met somehow. The bank would benefit students, 
not the administration, and if there was to be no space rental 
to a bank, the $24,000 would have to come from some other source. 

Trustee Carlson explained that the bank proposal was 
not central to the permanent financing proposal and could be con- 
sidered separately. The important thing, he said, was to go to 
permanent financing and to do so as soon as possible. President 
Wood and Chairman Healey strongly agreed with this analysis. 

Secretary Parks asked for a further explanation of the 
student opposition to the commercial bank, and asked Chancellor 
Bromery for an explanation of the agreement which is struck with 
the students when the students pay their fees for the support 
of the Campus Center . 



4 59 



Board 
3-3-76 

UM/Amherst — 
Budget Process 

UM/Amherst — 
Permanent Fin- 
ancing of the 
Campus Center 
(Doc. T76-047) 



4 60 



Board 
3-3-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gavin stated that the student opposition stems 
from a continuing conflict between cooperative and commercial 
interests in the building. She said that the students' credit 
union had been seeking space in the Campus Center and had been 
unable to secure it. She said that the main argument advanced 
for the commercial bank was that it could cash checks, while in 
her view a credit union could do so as easily as a bank. Secre- 
tary Parks asked whether the credit union would pay rent for 
the space as the bank was prepared to do. Trustee Gavin replied 
that she was not sure that the credit union could do so. 

Chancellor Bromery stressed one point made by Secretary 
Parks, that the bank was prepared to pay rent while the credit 
union would not. He said there were very great differences be- 
tween a credit union and a bank, and he saw no reason why they 
could not co-exist to perform different services. But a bank 
could provide many services which a credit union could not, and 
cashing checks was only one of the considerations. 

The Chancellor pointed out that the management of the 
Campus Center was based on a set of agreements and by-laws which 
had been worked out several years ago, even before he had become 
Chancellor. He pointed out that the administration had obliga- 
tions to the Commonwealth and the taxpayers as well as to the 
students. The administration must protect the interests of the 
taxpayers while at the same time providing the students with 
services. But it was not possible to let the students do what 
they wish with the building simply because their fees support 
the debt service. 

Trustee Gavin said she understood this obligation, but 
observed that she had an obligation to the students, who had 
asked her what their input is into the management of the Campus 
Center. She said that she was willing to sit down with the 
Board of Governors and Trustee Shaler of the Trustee Student 
Affairs Committee and discuss a fiscally sound decision-making 
process which includes student participation. Chancellor 
Bromery suggested that initial discussions should take place 
with the campus administration rather than with the Trustees, 
and remarked that no such discussions had been initiated by the 
students with the administration about these concerns. Trustee 
Gavin said that the students had been skirting them for a while, 
but that they would be bringing them up in the next several 
months. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority to seek permanent fin- 
ancing for Project #11 (Campus Center and 
Campus Center Garage) at available market 
rates for a total of $21,550,000 including 
the present note ($21,030,000), capital 
improvements ($250,000) and capitalization 
of the current debt ($270,000). 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4061 



Board 
3-3-76 



( 



Management/ 
Maintenance 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-048A) 



I 



Trustee Carlson resumed his report, proceeding to a 
proposed Management and Maintenance Agreement with the University 
of Massachusetts Tenants Association for Married Students' Housing UM/Amherst- 
at the Amherst campus (Doc. T76-048A) . This' w£s a complex pro- 
posal which had been discussed in a spirit of cooperation on 
both sides. The key issue had been whether such a delegation of 
management authority was legal with respect to the University's 
obligations to the Building Authority and the bondholders. The 
Chairman had felt that more discussion was needed, and the 
matter was therefore tabled and Counsel was directed to incorporat 
suggestions of Committee members in a revised draft of the Agree- 
ment for consideration by the Committee at a meeting held March 2. 
Although the Building Authority had not yet responded to a formal 
request for its position on the matter, the Committee had felt 
that the Board could proceed to authorize the Agreement . He 
read the motion, which included several conditions which must be 
fulfilled before the Agreement could take effect. 

Trustee Spiller asked whether all rents withheld had 
been remitted to the University and Vice President Janis replied 
that he understood that they had not but would be as soon as the 
Agreement was ready to be signed. Trustee Spiller then asked 
what would happen if the Building Authority did not approve the 
Agreement, and Counsel Searson replied that it could not be 
executed. Trustee Spiller made the point that he regarded the 
withholding of rents as a serious matter. There was no further 
discussion and, upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst to execute a 
Management and Maintenance Agreement (as set 
forth in Doc. T76-048A) with the Student 
Family Housing Cooperative, for the manage- 
ment and operation of student family housing 
facilities at the Amherst campus; provided , 
that said Agreement shall not be executed 
until (1) it has been approved by the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority; 
(2) a majority of the present tenants of such 
student family housing facilities have ex- 
pressed their concurrence to this Agreement 
and the related rules and regulations for 
tenants; and (3) the Chancellor has determined 
that all monies now in the possession of either 
the University of Massachusetts Tenants Associa- 
tion or the Student Family Housing Cooperative, 
which monies constitute rentals due to the 
University but which have been withheld, have 
been remitted to the University. 

Chairman Healey recognized Mr. Patrick Walker of the 
Tenants Association for a statement. Mr. Walker thanked Dr. Gage 



4062 



Board 
3-3-76 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Fac- 
ulty and Educa- 
tional Policy 

UM/Boston — 
Advisory Com- 
mittee Report on 
College III 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Janis and the Trustees for their hard work in bringing the 
proposal to completion. He also described the complexity of the 
administrative structure which the proposal had had to pass 
through and questioned whether such a structure was efficient. 
He maintained that cooperative management structures such as 
that being approved were more efficient. 

Chairman Healey next recognized Trustee Troy for the 
report of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 
Trustee Troy reported that the first item on the agenda had been 
a discussion of the Report of the Advisory Committee for College 
III at UM/Boston, known as the Altshuler Report, which Trustee 
Troy described as helpful, well-organized, well-written and clear 
The overall judgment of the Altshuler Report was "favorable but 
guarded." Its major recommendations set forth by Professor 
Altshuler were: (1) that College III should keep more careful 
records so that data can be monitored more intelligently, and 
that (2) a committee of distinguished academicians should be 
established to monitor and advise the College in attracting more 
low- income students, reducing the high attrition rate, and en- 
suring that graduates have skills in reading, writing and analysis 
comparable to those of the other colleges. Dean Strange expressed 
support for the concept of a Board of Evaluators, and Trustee 
Troy said he believed Chancellor Golino intended to appoint one 
soon. 

Another problem which was aired during the meeting was 
that of the difficulty of evaluating faculty for promotion and 
tenure when many come from nonacademic backgrounds. Trustee 
Troy said that some firm and fair agreement would have to be 
reached, since six faculty members would be due for a tenure 
decision this year. 



The Report was critical of the work-study programs at 
the College. It had been pointed out that the work component of 
the program should complement the study component. Dean Strange j 
had maintained that much progress had been made in this area 
but did not minimize the difficulties of finding positions for 
students that would move them toward their educational goals. 

Trustee Troy urged all Trustees to read the Report, 
since he had stressed only the highlights. He added that the 
report had also included warm praise for the devotion of the 
hard-working faculty in scoring major successes with little 
planning time in the many innovative concepts and programs 
which College III had undertaken. 

Trustee Burack said she believed that the proposed 
Board of Evaluators for College III should be not only dis- 
tinguished, but competent in the areas to which it would address 
itself. Trustee Troy expressed confidence that Chancellor 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Golino would certainly appoint persons to this Board with ex- 
perience in competency-based education. 

Trustee Troy next presented a proposal for the Estab- 
lishment of a Bachelor of Science Degree in Food Engineering in 
the College of Food and Natural Resources at the Amherst campus 
(Doc. T76-045). This was more a name change than a new program, 
since the focus of the Department of Food and Agricultural 
Engineering has gradually shifted more toward food processing in 
recent years. The change would require no new faculty or re- 
sources, Trustee Troy stressed. The students presently pursuing 
a degree in Food and Agricultural Engineering would be permitted 
to complete their studies, but no new students would be accepted 
in this course of study. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish a Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Food Engineering at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst as described in Doc. T76-045. 

Chairman Healey asked for the report of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Spiller said the February 17 
meeting had been long and informative, and that the minutes of 
the meeting were very complete. He spoke specifically about the 
success which has been achieved by the campuses in energy con- 
servation. The Boston campus alone had saved $400,000 in 
calendar year 1975 over the preceding year. He said that the 
other campuses had achieved similar savings. 

Trustee Spiller said the Committee was informed that 
the Kennedy Library site selection was moving forward. The plan 
now is to build the library on the northeast corner of the 
peninsula, directly facing the outer harbor. 

The next item was a discussion of the new gymnasium at 
the Harbor Campus. The Committee had expressed its grave concern 
over the delay in the project, and Trustee Spiller said the 
longer the project is delayed, the more it will cost. 

The Committee had received reports on a number of 
other items, none of which required a vote. This completed the 
report . 

The Chairman turned next to the report of the Committee 
on Health Affairs, recognizing Trustee Robertson. The first item 
had been a discussion of a proposed Establishment of a Department 



of Laboratory Medicine at the Worcester campus (Doc. T76-049) . 
This matter was discussed by the Committee and was transmitted 
without a vote to the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
with the recommendation that it be passed on to the full Board. 

The second item of business was a discussion of the 
composition of the Hospital Management Board mandated by the 



4 63 



Board 
3-3-76 



UM/ Amherst — 
Degree in Food 
Engineering 
(Doc. T76-045) 



Report of Com- 
mittee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

Energy Savings 



UM/Boston — 
Kennedy Library 



UM/Boston- 
Gymnasium 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Health 
Affairs 

UM/ Worcester — 
Department of 
Laboratory 
Medicine 



(Doc. T76-049) 



4 64 



Board 
3-3-71 



•rcester — 
isition of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Medical Center By-laws (Doc. T76-034A) . The discussion had 



DM/Wo 

Compo 

Hospital Manage-, by the Committee. The conclusions which the Committee reached 

ment Board 



focused on the kind of appointive members desired, and Trustee 
Robertson reiterated the kinds of skills and backgrounds suggestec 



UM/Worcester — 

Affirmative 

Action 



Report of Dele- 
gate to Board 
of Higher Edu- 
cation 



were: (1) that the members should be selected from as wide a 
spectrum of backgrounds as possible, (2) that the persons se- 
lected should be of the highest quality, and (3) that the persons 
selected should be approached in advance to ascertain their 
willingness to serve. The Committee hoped to give Chairman 
Healey a list of recommended individuals in time for his appoint- 
ment by the April meeting. As to the procedure, Associate Vice 
President Eller would contact members of the Board of Trustees 
and appropriate staff on the campuses to solicit nominations. 
The Committee would then discuss the nominations at its meeting 
on March 30, and forward a list to the Chairman of the Board. 

Secretary Parks asked whether there was an intention 
to include minority and female representation on the Hospital 
Management Board. Trustee Robertson said he would agree with 
the need for this and said the criteria for the appointive 
membership could be amended to include such representation. He 
stressed that the most important criterion was that of high 
quality. Chairman Healey remarked that the Trustees were always 
mindful of such representation in the appointment of committees. 

This had completed the formal agenda of the Health 
Affairs Committee, but Trustee McNeil had raised the question of 
the progress made in the recruitment of minority and women med- 
ical students, faculty and professional staff at the Medical 
School. Chancellor Bulger did not have specific figures with 
him, but said he would be happy to provide specific information 
at the March meeting of the Committee. This completed Trustee 
Robertson's report. 

Chairman Healey asked next for the Report of the Dele- 
gate to the Board of Higher Education, and recognized Trustee 
Troy. Trustee Troy reported that the Board of Higher Education 
had met on February 19 with the Governor and Secretary Parks in 
the Governor's office. It was Trustee Troy's impression that 
the Governor wanted to get an idea of how the Board viewed its 
responsibilities in relation to higher education in general and 
public higher education in particular. Nothing conclusive had 
been decided upon at this informal meeting, but a number of 
topics had been discussed. 

In fiscal matters, the Governor had felt that the BHE's 
recommended $27 million cut from the segmental budgets had been 
insufficient. It had been stated in reply that further cuts 
would be disastrous and would lead to large reductions in enroll- 
ments. The Board was reluctant to let this happen, because it 
wished to maintain access to higher education for all students 
with aspiration and ability. Discussion had also taken place on 
raising tuition and fees as a means of reducing the Commonwealth's 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

total contribution, but members of the Board again pointed to 
the problem of maintaining access. 

The Governor had asked about the bill filed by the 
Board to reorganize itself, and seemed to leave the impression 
that he did not look favorably on the broad and ambitious re- 
organization of higher education advocated in some quarters. 
He said he would clarify his position in the spring. 

Trustee Troy then reported on an action taken by the 
Board at its meeting on February 20, on the recommendation of 
its Affirmative Action Committee; namely, to forward to the chief 
executives of all the segments an advisory statement which advo- 
cated that layoffs, retrenchment or nonrenewal actions be con- 
ducted in such a manner as to minimize adverse impact on women 
or minorities. This completed Trustee Troy's report. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Board and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 



4065 



Board 
3-3-76 



I 




fcut 




Jladys Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



! 



4066 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



1 



' 



' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April 7, 1976; 3:00 p.m. 
The University Library 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

ATTENDANCE: j Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 

Trustees Abrams , Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Cronin, 
Dennis, Eddy, Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rothenburger 
Shaler, Shearer, Spiller and Troy; Mrs. Blues tone representing 
Trustee Fielding, Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop, Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, Secretary Parks representing 
Trustee Dukakis 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Rowland and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President 
for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. 
Melley, Public Affairs Director; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student 
Representative; Professor Tillona, Special Assistant to the Chan- 
cellor; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Hittelman, Acting 
Faculty Representative 

Guests : Professors Brown, Hart, Patterson, Powers, Robinson, 
Spaethling, and Tinder, and students Richard Hilli, Joanne 
Perlman, and Locksley Bryan, all from UM/Boston; Mr. Martus, UM/A 

The meeting was called to order at 3:10 p.m. The 
Chairman first presented the minutes of the previous meeting for 
amendment or correction. There being none, it was moved, secondei 
and 



VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
March 3, 1976. 

Chairman Healey called on the President for his remarks 
President Wood began by stating that, as a matter of practice, 
he had always stood ready to meet with any responsible body of 
students or faculty for serious discussion of any issue. This 
was a reference to a discussion during the meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee about the character of student participation in 



4067 



Approval of 
Minutes of Pre- 
vious Meeting 



President ' s 
Remarks 



4 68 



Board 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee meetings. The President took this opportunity to re- 
iterate this offer to the new student Trustee serving at his 
first meeting, Paul Cronin. 

The President informed the Board that he had appeared 
before the Joint Committee on Education to testify as an individ- 
ual with respect to proposals for reorganization of public higher 
education. He said that he believed Senate Bill #1371 to be the 
preferred proposal, but he said the process of consideration has 
just begun and he will suggest amendments as the process continues 
He noted a broad concurrence of the legislative and executive 
branches that some form of reorganization is appropriate and 
timely. This concurrence was reassuring, he said, and in coming 
months it would be his concern to speak for the interest of the 
University. 

President Wood further reported that he had met with 
46 presidents of public and private institutions of higher learn- 
ing at a meeting at the Worcester campus, and he stressed that 
the tenor of the discussion showed the importance of the public 
and private sectors continuing efforts to work together. 

Finally, the President reported that he and the Chan- 
cellors had testified before the House Ways and Means Committee 
with respect to the University Budget. Though he believed 
House #1 to be too low a figure, he described it as a good 
starting point, and expressed satisfaction at the more construc- 
tive atmosphere in which the budget process for FY 1977 was 
being conducted. 

Secretary Parks asked whether there would be an oppor- 
tunity for the Board to discuss the bills filed in the Legislature 
for reorganization, and Chairman Healey replied that it had been 
his intent to initiate a discussion at the end of the meeting. 
However, since the subject had been raised, it could be dealt 
with at this point in the meeting. He said that, if the members 
of the Board wish, he would be prepared to call a special meeting 
in May for those members who would like to discuss the reorganiza- 
tion proposals. He suggested that the Trustees might wish then 
to appoint a special committee to follow the legislative pro- 
cess and keep the Board informed. 

Secretary Parks suggested that copies of the bills be 
provided to the Board for review and discussion. The President 
said that this would be done, and the Chairman encouraged all 
Trustees to make their views known. 



Trustee Burack commended the Chairman and the President 
for their commitment to openness as this process continues, and 
said it was a welcome contrast to the unfortunate atmosphere 
which had existed in the fall. She suggested that a special 
meeting might be held by all the segmental boards in order to 



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4 69 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

iron out their differences and take a common position. She said 
there were undoubtedly good things in each of the plans, and 
said she did not usually "buy packages." Such a procedure would 
be preferable to "a donnybrook on the steps of the State House." 

This completed the President's remarks, and he called 
on Chancellor Bromery of the Amherst campus. Chancellor Bromery 
began by saying that he regretted the atmosphere in which this 
meeting was being held. He hoped the Trustees would continue 
to come to the campus and that they would hold future meetings 
in the Campus Center, where more students could attend. 

Chancellor Bromery said he believed that much of the 
problem that had been encountered was due to the reorganizing of 
student government committees, which had resulted in an inadequate 
mechanism for student input into issues before they are brought 
to the Trustees. A new student government administration had 
been elected to serve for a full year, and he hoped this problem 
would be rectified. 

The Chancellor next reported that Professor Robert 
Wellman had been appointed as Ombudsman on the Amherst campus to 
replace Professor Jay Savereid, who had done an excellent job. 

Chancellor Bromery reported that the UM/ Amherst Three 
Critics art exhibition had been named to represent the United 
States at the Venice Bienalle, an international art exposition 
in Venice, Italy. He described this as a great honor for the 
University and the Commonwealth. 

The Chancellor said he had read each of the bills filed 
to reorganize public higher education in the Commonwealth, and 
he urged the Trustees to review this issue with an eye toward 
ensuring the academic integrity of the University and in partic- 
ular the Amherst campus. This concluded the Chancellor's report. 

Chancellor Bulger of the Worcester campus reported that 
the Medical Center had received an accreditation visit the pre- 
vious week, and the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of 
the American Medical Association and the American Association 
of Medical Colleges had informed him that it planned to recommend 
a three-year accreditation. He reported that the Committee had 
been pleased that the Hospital had opened and with the way it 
was functioning. 

This completed the Presidential Agenda, and Chairman 
Healey turned to the report of the Executive Committee. Since 
all the members of the Board present had attended the Executive 
Committee meeting just concluded, on motion made and seconded, 
without further discussion, it was 



Board 
4-7-76 



UM/ Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor 's 
Remarks 



Executive 
Committee 



4 70 



Board 

4-7-76 

Classifications 

of Position 

Titles 

(Docs. T76-058, 

T76-061) 



Personnel Action 
(Docs. T76-062, 
T76-059) 



FY77 Budget 

Request 

(Docs. T75-033, 

T76-063) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the classification of position 

title as set forth in Trustee Document T76-058. 

VOTED : To approve the classification of two position 

titles as set forth in Trustee Document T76-061. 

VOTED : The classification of Position Titles under the 
Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific 
weekly salary rate which shall not be changed 
except by vote of the Board of Trustees and 
such classification shall not be designated 
by any job group number or grade. 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 648 
of the Acts of 1962, the position titles in the 
Professional Staff contained in Doc. T76-058 and 
Doc. T76-061 are classified at a weekly salary 
rate specified after the title of position sub- 
ject to subsequently being amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
under the provisions of said Chapter 648. 

VOTED : To concur in the appointment by the Chancellor 
of the University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
of Dr. Philip S. Caper as Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs, effective July 4, 1976, and 
to approve the personnel action as set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-062. 

VOTED : To approve the personnel action as set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-059. 

VOTED : Every personnel action shall be subject to the 
policies and procedures now in effect as sub- 
sequently amended, revised, added to or repealed 
by the Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 
fessional personnel under the provisions of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962. The classifi- 
cation, salary range and descriptive job spec- 
ification for each position to which a member 
of the professional staff is hereby appointed, 
promoted, transferred or determined shall be 
as hereafter determined by the Board of Trustees 
or under their authority. 

VOTED: To concur with the recommendation of the Presi- 
dent to approve the request of the Worcester 
campus to revise the Fiscal Year 1977 budget 
request for the University Hospital from 
$11,175,181 as appears in Doc. T75-033 to 
$9,500,000 as is summarized in Doc. T76-063. 



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! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman introduced the matter of Financing of 
Building Authority Projects #11 and #14. He recognized Trustee 
Cronin, who cited portions of the University Governance State- 
ment (Doc. T73-098) which assigned primary responsibility to 
students in activities primarily financed by students. He 
stated that, if the Trustees agree to transfer funds from the 
residence hall trust fund for the purchase of Project 14 land, 
they will be making a mockery of the governance procedure. 
While the Governance Statement assigns primary responsibility to 
students in these matters, in fact they have had only the right 
to review and make suggestions, without any effectual influence 
on the outcome. Trustee Cronin next introduced Student Govern- 
ment Co-President Jay Martus to make a statement. 

Mr. Martus read a Trustee vote of 1966 establishing 
the Residence Hall Trust Fund which contained language setting 
forth the purposes for which the funds would be used: debt 
service and operation and maintenance of the residence halls. 
He then referred to a recent memorandum from Treasurer Johnson 
which said that surplus funds in the residence hall trust fund 
could be used for the purchase of land on Project #14. 

Mr. Martus argued that these funds were not surplus, 
since the residence halls had deteriorated to the point of being 
uninhabitable. There was not now and would not be residence 
halls on the Project #14 land. He quoted several Office of 
Residential Life memoranda which had stated that $26 million 
would be needed over the next five years for maintenance, renova- 
tion and capital improvement of the halls in order to reverse 
the deterioration. The memoranda called for a schedule of one 
renovation and five refurbishments annually. The residence 
halls, he said, are now renovated on a forty-year cycle. The 
memoranda opposed the policy of compromising the value of the 
buildings in order to balance the budget. Mr. Martus concluded 
by saying that if this transfer to purchase the Project #14 land 
is approved, the Student Government Association will take legal 
action. 

Trustee Shaler commented that the Committee on Student 
Affairs had discussed the plight of the residence halls, but that 
the first time he heard about this transfer was when he read 
about it in the Collegian. He said that the financial position 
of the residence halls would be difficult even without this 
transfer, and he said he was disturbed at the legal implications 
of it. 

A review of the historical context of Project #14 and 
the residence hall system followed. With respect to Project #14, 
Chancellor Bromery said the land had been purchased at a time 
when the campus was expected to grow to 35,000 students. Another 
reason for the purchase was to prevent damage to the University 
environment by undesirable development. The Trustees had just 
decided to stop enrollment growth at 25,000 when he had become 



4 71 



Board 
4-7-76 

UM/Amherst — 
Financing of 
Projects No. 
11 and 14 
(Docs. T76-064 
T76-065) 



4 72 



Board 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor in 1970, and the construction costs for the project 
had risen so sharply, he said, that rents would have had to be 
$1000 a year. Therefore he had stopped the project. The project 
had been financed by short term notes, and it was no longer 
possible to roll these notes over; if they were not retired by 
April 15, the Building Authority would be in default. There- 
fore the University had no choice but to purchase the land so 
the Building Authority could pay off the notes. The money for 
the purchase had to come out of the Residence Hall Trust Fund 
because there was no other source. As for the condition of the 
residence halls, Chancellor Bromery agreed that a long-range 
renovation and maintenance program would have to be initiated, 
and he said he would do whatever he could to see that the funds 
in the Residence Hall Trust Fund are replaced from some source. 

Several Trustees recalled that the Legislature had 
refused over the years to provide funds for the construction or 
support of nonacademic buildings such as residence halls. This 
necessitated the self-liquidating basis on which the residence 
halls were operated. It was noted that the effort to keep the 
rents and fees as low as possible over the years had contributed 
to the condition of the residence halls. 

Trustee Breyer asked what alternative the students 
proposed. Mr. Martus said the students' position was that the 
transfer from the residence hall trust fund was illegal and in- 
correct, and that if not taking that course meant default, so be 
it. The impact of a default was discussed. Among other comments 
Secretary Parks observed that if this were to happen, the result 
would be to alienate the legislative and executive branches, 
possibly resulting in a drastically reduced budget with its dire 
implications for the needs and interests of students. 

The question was moved and seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To rescind the Board of Trustees vote of 

March 3, 1976 pertaining to its Project 11 
Financing request to the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority and to 
substitute therefor: 

VOTED : That a request be made to the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority to 
undertake permanent financing for Project 
11 (Campus Center and Campus Center Garage) 
at available rates for a total not to ex- 
ceed $23,000,000 including Building Author- 
ity preliminary expense of not more than 
$300,000; and with respect to the prelim- 
inary expenses, further to recommend that 
the University agree to enter into a 
lease with the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority for space in Project #11 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for an annual amount equal to that portion 
of debt-service attributable to the amor- 
tization of the aforementioned preliminary- 
expenses; provided that rental payments 
for such lease shall not be paid from 
the student fee-based budget. 

VOTED : That the making of a Fourth Amendment to the 
Contract for Financial Assistance dated as of 
January 31, 1967 between the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 of 
the Acts of 1960 as amended and providing, among 
other things, for inclusion of certain expense 
in the Cost of the Project and for an increase 
in the Maximum Cost of the Project to which such 
Contract pertains, be and the same hereby is 
authorized; that the form of such Amendment pre- 
sented to this meeting and each term, condition 
and provision therein contained be and the same 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on behalf 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to sign, 
acknowledge if deemed advisable and deliver an 
Amendment in the form presented to this meeting 
and providing, among other things, for a Maxi- 
mum Cost of the Eleventh Project, as defined 
in said Contract as heretofore amended, of 
Twenty-Three Million Dollars ($23,000,000) and 
to cause the common seal of said University and 
of said Trustees to be affixed thereto; and 
that the taking of such action by said Trustees 
shall be conclusive evidence that the same is 
hereby authorized and that the form of Amend- 
ment so executed is as hereby authorized and 
approved. 

VOTED : That the making of a "Campus Center Project 
University Store Revenue Agreement" between 
the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, acting in the name and on be- 
half of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and 
the University of Massachusetts Building Author- 
ity pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, 
as amended, pertaining to the Management and 
Services Agreement between the Trustees and 
the Authority relating to the Eleventh Project 
of the Authority ("the Campus Center Project") 
dated as of December 1, 1969, and the operation 
and maintenance of university store facilities 
at the same Eleventh Project, is hereby autho- 
rized; that the form of such Campus Center Pro- 
ject University Store Revenue Agreement presented 



4 73 



Board 
4-7-76 



Campus Center 
Project Univ. 
Store Revenue 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-064) 



4074 



Board 
4-7-76 



Campus Center 
Project Food 
Services 
Revenue Agree- 
ment 
(Doc. T76-065) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to this meeting (Trustee Doc. T76-064) and each 
term, condition and provision therein contained 
be and the same hereby are approved; that said 
Trustees or a majority thereof hereby are autho- 
rized in the name and behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to sign, acknowledge if deemed 
advisable and deliver a Campus Center Project 
University Store Revenue Agreement in the form 
presented to this meeting and to cause the seal 
of the said Trustees to be affixed thereto; and 
that the taking of such action by said Trustees 
shall be conclusive evidence that the same is 
hereby authorized and that the form of the 
Campus Center Project University Store Revenue 
Agreement is as hereby authorized and approved. 

VOTED : That the making of a "Campus Center Project Food 
Services Revenue Agreement" between the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
acting in the name of and on behalf of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, and the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority pursuant to 
Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as amended, per- 
taining to the Management and Services Agreement 
between the Trustees and the Authority relating 
to the Eleventh Project of the Authority ("the 
Campus Center Project") dated as of December 1, 
1969, and the operation and maintenance of food 
and beverage services facilities at the said 
Eleventh Project, is hereby authorized; that 
the form of such Campus Center Project Food Serv- 
ices Revenue Agreement presented to this meeting 
(Trustee Doc. T76-065) and each term, condition 
and provision therein contained be and the same 
hereby are authorized in the name and behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to sign, ac- 
knowledge if deemed advisable and deliver a 
Campus Center Project Food Services Revenue Agree- 
ment in the form presented to this meeting and 
to cause the seal of said Trustees to be affixed 
thereto; and that the taking of such action by 
said Trustees shall be conclusive evidence that 
the same is hereby authorized and that the form 
of the Campus Center Project Food Services Revenue 
Agreement so executed is as hereby authorized 
and approved. 

VOTED : That the making of a First Amendment to the 

Management and Services Agreement dated as of 
December 1, 1969 between the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, acting in the name 
and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 



I 



I 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and University of Massachusetts Building Author- 
ity pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, 
as amended, pertaining to the Eleventh Project 
of the Authority, be and the same hereby is 
authorized; that the form of such First Amend- 
ment to such Management and Services Agreement 
presented to this meeting and each term, condi- 
tion and provision therein contained be and the 
same hereby is approved; that said Trustees or 
a majority thereof be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to sign, acknowledge if deemed 
advisable and deliver a First Amendment to such 
Management and Services Agreement in the form 
presented to this meeting and to cause the 
common seal of said University and of said Trustees 
to be affixed thereto; and that the taking of 
such action by said Trustees shall be conclusive 
evidence that the same is hereby authorized and 
that the form of First Amendment to such Manage- 
ment and Services Agreement so executed is as 
hereby authorized and approved. 

VOTED ; To request the University of Massachusetts 

Building Authority to take the following ac- 
tion on Project 14: to forthwith terminate 
Project 14 in accordance with Article Twelfth 
of the Contract for Financial Assistance be- 
tween the Commonwealth of Massachusetts acting 
by and through the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts and the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority dated June 1, 1971. 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees authorize the Trea- 
surer of the University to accept a Deed from 
the University of Massachusetts Building Autho- 
rity, pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 
1960, as amended, to the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts relating to a parcel 
of land in Amherst, Massachusetts, being the 
premises described in the Deed of Fraternity- 
Sorority Park, Inc. to the Authority dated 
July 23, 1971, and recorded in Hampshire Deeds 
Doc. 5944, Book 1600, Page 715. 

VOTED : That in consideration for the Deed referred 

to in the preceding vote, the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
cause to be paid from the Residence Hall Trust 
Fund account to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority the sum of Three Hundred 
Sixty-four Thousand ($364,000.00) Dollars upon 
delivery of the said Deed. 



4 75 



Board 
4-7-76 



4 76 



Board 
4-7-76 



Committee on 

Long-Range 

Planning 

Field Stations 



UM/Boston — 
Merger of 
College I & II 



Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustees Cronin and Rothenburger noted nay. 

Chairman Healey then called for the report of the Com- 
mittee on Long-Range Planning. At the request of Chairman Row- 
land, Trustee Clark reported for the Committee. The first matter 
had been the University's several extension and field stations. 
President Wood had presented a brief historical sketch of the 
stations, saying they represented the land grant character of 
the University, and pointing out the breadth of their assistance 
to the general areas of food production and food technology. 

The Committee had then heard reports from Dean Spielman 
and Chancellor Bromery on four of the stations administered by 
the Amherst campus. Trustee Clark conveyed the apologies of 
the Chairman of the Committee that the pressure of time prevented 
a more full discussion of the issues. Several Trustees had also 
expressed regret that such useful programs as those carried out 
by and at the field stations sometimes suffer financially because 
of low visibility, and the campuses were requested to provide 
further information to the Committee. 

Trustee Clark next reported that the Committee had dis- 
cussed the plan of Chancellor Golino to merge Colleges I and II 
at UM/Boston into a single college of liberal arts. The Com- 
mittee had not discussed the academic, administrative aspects of 
the proposal, but specifically its consistency with Trustee- 
approved enrollment guidelines and development priorities. 

The general conclusions of the Committee, after ex- 
tensive discussion, had been: 

1. That the Chancellor's plan was not in conflict 
with the development priorities for the Boston 
campus established by the Trustees; 

2. that the gradual, selective development of 
graduate programs stated as the third point 
in the policy guidelines is not involved in 
this merger issue, and that the development 
of graduate programs must not interfere or 
be at the expense of, student support serv- 
ices and the undergraduate programs, and; 

3. that, if a merger is approved, the highest 
priority must be given to the continuation 
and improvement of student services as the 
merger is implemented. 

This completed Trustee Clark's report. Chairman 
Healey next recognized Trustee Troy for the report of the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy reported 
first on a proposed Establishment of a Department of Laboratory 
Medicine at UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-049) , explaining that the 
proposal had been endorsed by the Committee on Health Affairs 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at its February meeting. At the request of Secretary Parks, 
Chancellor Bulger explained that this was an organizational 
change in line with current practice at most major medical 
schools, and that no additional staff or funds would be required 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Laboratory Medicine 
at the University of Massachusetts at Worcester, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-049. 

Chairman Troy turned next to the proposed merger of 
Colleges I and II at UM/Boston. He declined to summarize the 
many arguments made at the Committee's meeting, since they were 
reported rather extensively in the minutes of the meeting. He 
summarized the Chancellor's position, which was supported by 
the Committee by a vote of four to two, with one abstention. 

Chairman Troy said he believed it was important for 
the Trustees to be aware of the present situation with respect 
to the two liberal arts colleges. Although there were two 
colleges of liberal arts, there were not two different, parallel 
and balanced sets of departments. When the colleges had split 
five years ago, he said, two disciplines, Physics and Chemistry, 
had elected to remain outside the colleges altogether, while 
recently the mathematics department has received Assembly approval, 
for reunification. All in all, he said, there were three pro- 
grams on the Boston campus and 33 academic units or departments. 
Of these 33, eleven are now single departments, either serving 
both colleges or only one of the two. 

Thus, eleven pairs of departments are still split. In 
the Chancellor's view, six of these eleven pairs either wished 
to reunite, or lacked a majority against reuniting. Of the 
remaining five pairs, the Chancellor believed three were seriously 
divided and two were definitely against the merger. Chancellor 
Golino had said that these views were his impressions, but that 
they had been based on credibility, because in the two weeks 
prior he had talked with almost every chairperson and about 80 
faculty members. 

Chairman Troy stressed the importance of realizing 
that the proposal was not for the merger of 33 pairs of depart- 
ments. Much merging either never took place, has already occurred 
or is irrelevant to the status of the disciplines. 

Trustee Troy continued with a discussion of Chancellor 
Golino 's reasons. The savings to be accrued from a merger, 
while not enormous nor of paramount importance, were real, and 
a merger would provide for more economical administration. A 
second reason advanced by the Chancellor was that merger would 
create critical masses of faculty necessary for the implementa- 
tion of the Trustee-mandated extended-day program which would 



4 77 



Board 
4-7-76 

UM/Worcester — 
Department of 
Laboratory 
Medicine 
(Doc. T76-049) 



UM/Boston — 
Merger of 
Colleges I & II 



4 78 



Board 

4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

increase access to working students. A department of fourteen 
members would be better able to distribute its assignments for 
the provision of such programs than a department of six members. 

Another reason offered by the Chancellor was that the 
split had harmed the Division of Student Affairs, and that this 
Division's services would be more effectively provided in a 
unified College of Liberal Arts. 

Chancellor Golino had denied that he had moved too 
quickly, reported Trustee Troy, but said he had perhaps waited 
too long, and said the reunification of the colleges would es- 
tablish a structure that would bring a greater cohesion to the 
campus and facilitate the missions and goals of the campus. He 
had also made the point that merger did not imply any diminution 
of the strength, variety or numbers of programs. 

Trustee Troy continued that the Committee had engaged 
in much discussion and had raised many questions, the implica- 
tions of which were reflected in the carefully qualified vote 
which had been taken. The impact on the access of, and services 
to, students was a major concern, and implementation of the 
merger was a serious issue. Some Trustees had felt that the 
details of the implementation should have been spelled out as 
part of the Chancellor's proposal. Chancellor Golino had re- 
sponded that he had such a plan, but that he had not felt it to 
be appropriate for him to offer it until the concept had been 
approved. This concern had been spelled out in the Committee's 
vote, and the Chancellor had described the implementation pro- 
cess in broad terms. He had expressed sensitivity to these con- 
cerns for flexibility in implementation. Trustee Troy then 
read the proposed vote. 

Chairman Healey then recognized Chancellor Golino, who 
remarked that Trustee Troy's full summary of his (the Chancellor's) 
proposal had made unnecessary a repetition on his part. He pre- 
sented, instead, a memorandum to the President which contained 
an overview of his implementation plan. The plan called for the 
establishment of a unified College of Liberal Arts as a general 
structure by the beginning of the academic year 1976-77, and 
contemplated no change in academic programming during that year. 
The plan was offered with the expectation that a number of 
matters relating to educational and organizational development 
will require another year to be arranged. The plan did not 
attempt to resolve, he said, all the details of implementation 
in advance, but to provide a broad framework to which concerned 
parties may constructively contribute. 

The implementation of the merger would be placed under 
the supervision of a special committee which will report to, 
and be jointly appointed by, the Chancellor and the Assembly. 
The Chancellor said his implementation plan would be guided by 
two aims: to protect the interests of students, and to protect 



' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the interests of faculty within the overall opportunities and 
constraints of the campus. He read several guidelines for the 
process which set forth in greater detail the specifics of the 
aims described above. His memorandum also described the process 
and the timetable by which the special committee would function. 
Under this timetable, implementation of all major features of 
unification should be accomplished by September 1977. 

Chairman Healey thanked the Chancellor for his presen- 
tation, and turned to the presentations of interested individ- 
uals on the campus. He pointed out that these individuals, in 
line with Board policy, had submitted their names to the Secre- 
tary through the Chancellor in writing in advance of the meeting. 
Also in line with Trustee policy, each individual was asked to 
confine his or her remarks to five minutes, and the overall time 
frame was to be thirty minutes. He then asked Secretary Hardy 
to call on the individuals by name. 

Professor Thomas Brown stated that he no longer opposed 
the merger as he had at the Committee's meeting. He had talked 
with many faculty since the Committee meeting, and had concluded 
that to reject the Chancellor's recommendation would discourage 
stability on the campus. He therefore said he wished to defer 
to the judgment of the Chancellor and the Committee, but stressed 
that in order for a merger to move forward successfully, an 
atmosphere of trust and generosity on all sides was essential. 
He welcomed the Chancellor's promise to involve all segments of 
faculty opinion in the implementation, and said the implementa- 
tion committee and the new dean should have the confidence of 
the campus community. 

Professor Eric Robinson stated the belief that simple 
structures are always to be preferred to complicated ones, unless 
there is substantial evidence to the contrary. He did not believe 
that the idea of student identification with colleges of either 
5,000 or 2,500 was reasonable, and argued instead that class 
size and department strength were more meaningful. He described 
a misallocation of resources and an inappropriate competitive 
spirit under the split-college system and said that, while the 
merger might not save much money, it would release many faculty 
for teaching. Interdisciplinary programs, which had been said 
to be threatened by the merger, had existed before the split 
and could survive without it. Professor Robinson alluded to 
Chancellor Golino's intention to maintain equity in personnel 
decisions in a merged college, and added that he hoped that the 
merger would allow a more equitable process of personnel decisions 

Professor Francis Hart declined to repeat his state- 
ments at the Committee's meeting, but reaffirmed his opposition 
to the merger. He stressed the risks of the merger: what if 
this reorganization proved to be as unsatisfactory as the last 
several? He doubted that the risk was justifiable on the basis 
of the improvements to be gained. 



4 79 



Board 
4-7-76 



4 080 



Board 

4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Professor Robert Spaethl 
were concerned with the interests 
view that faculty should be in the 
time in Committee work. The split 
times under different circumstance 
This was an issue, he said, on whi 
agree, but he said that in such a 
was needed if the faculty was to b 
constructively. 



ing emphasized that all sides 
of students. He offered the 
classroom more and spend less 
system was created in different 
s, and should not be worshipped, 
ch honorable persons could dis- 
sipation strong leadership 
e persuaded to move forward 



Richard Hilli, a student, argued that the merger would 
destroy the most valuable aspect of UM/Boston. Support services 
would be cut back, interdisciplinary programs would suffer and 
small, more personalized departments would become centralized. 
He also charged that students' views had been ignored by the 
Chancellor, remarking that he had not even waited for the results 
of the referendum in which 82 percent of those voting opposed 
the merger. 

Locksley Bryan, another student, spoke in favor of the 
merger, citing personal experience with the difficulties of stu- 
dents in one college gaining access to courses in another. He 
also criticized the problems of student support services, saying 
that more than two years after arriving at UM/Boston, he still 
did not have an advisor. Speaking to the issue of maintaining 
both innovative and traditional approaches to education, Mr. 
Bryan said there was no reason why both approaches could not 
continue to exist in unified departments. Referring to the stu- 
dent referendum, Mr. Bryan expressed the view that students had 
not been well informed before the vote on what would and would 
not happen with a merger. He felt that the result of the vote 
suggested a manipulation of students. 

Joanne Perlman, a student, argued against the merger. 
There were real differences between the colleges, including 
differences in requirements. She argued that interdisciplinary 
programs were possible only through the college system. As for 
the Trustee-mandated extended-day programs, she pointed out that 
College I had already decided on an extended-day program, and 
said that a merger would only delay such a program. It would 
be far better, she said, to perfect the present system than to 
destroy it. 

Ms. Perlman was highly critical of what she regarded 
as the administration's and Trustees' disregard of students' 
views. The turnout of students for the merger referendum was 
the largest in UM/Boston history. She had told students that 
the Trustees would listen to their views, but now felt that both 
students and the UM/Boston Constitution were being ignored. 

Professor Glenn Tinder said there were advantages and 
disadvantages in either system — there was no ideal system. But 
the greatest need was for the campus to settle down. He said he 



' 



F 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

did not believe that UM/Boston was a true university yet, that 
it was not sufficiently engaged in the process of teaching and 
research. The merger would represent yet another crisis with 
two years of reorganization for doubtful gains. He said the 
present system was workable, if not perfect. 

Professor Richard Powers recalled, as one of the early 
proponents of the collegiate system, that there were to have 
been no differences between them. He noted that the present 
split liberal arts component was so different from what was en- 
visioned at the start as to make the original theory irrelevant. 
He described the lack of interest in this issue on the campus : 
two faculty meetings called specifically to discuss it had failed 
of a quorum, and he observed that only 20 percent of the student 
body had cast ballots in the student referendum. 

He said the campus had fallen far short of its aspira- 
tions, and many faculty were bitter at the inability of the cam- 
pus to provide students with the education they deserve. He 
recommended that the Trustees support the Chancellor, because to 
fail to do so would be a victory of those on campus who would 
resist the Chancellor's efforts to make the campus a respected 
and effective institution. 

Professor Marshall said that the Chancellor's plan did 
not emphasize educational philosophy, but was instead focused 
on issues of structure and leadership. She said that the campus 
was deeply divided, and the Trustees' judgment should be made 
on the basis of educational philosophy. 

Chairman Healey next opened the meeting to discussion 
by Trustees. Trustee Rothenburger stated that he would oppose 
the merger. He maintained that students' input into the issue 
was articulate and showed that they were well informed. He 
also pointed out that students' views should be taken seriously, 
since they are most concerned. He said he objected to the pro- 
cess by which this proposal had been presented, and observed 
that there had been no plan for implementation until this meeting 
If there is no merger today, he said, the University must begin 
immediately to address the outstanding problems on the campus. 
He then 

MOVED : That the merger be tabled until the plan that 
will show the positive effects that the merger 
will have on the academic and student support 
services is fully discussed by the Harbor Cam- 
pus and Park Square Community. 

The motion was seconded, but after brief discussion, 
Trustee Rothenburger withdrew the motion to ensure that the 
merits of the issue would be fully discussed by the Board. The 
Chairman then called on Secretary Parks. 



4 081 



Board 
4-7-76 



4082 



Board 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Parks stated that the UM/Boston campus had 
originally intended to serve the urban community, but stated that 
this proposal was a model for precluding this mission, from 
which he said universities everywhere were retreating. If there 
are problems, he asked, why could improvements not be made? If 
the Trustees were saying that the concept of a college system was 
a failure, then they were saying that the urban mission was also 
a failure. He said he would oppose the merger unless he heard 
a guarantee that the campus would continue to serve the urban 
community under a merged system. 

Mr. Tubbs was recognized, and he told Secretary Parks 
that he was also concerned with urban students, but that the 
problem was that there had never been a budget sufficient to 
provide the necessary support services. He believed that the 
only way to provide these services was through a merger. He 
pointed out that programs and courses would not change. 

President Wood commented that the concept of six lib- 
j eral arts colleges had never spoken specifically to the urban 
I mission, and that this was primarily a function of admissions 
j and support services. In 1972, he recalled, he had been concerned 
| with the fragmentation of resources represented by the division 
of the UM/Boston liberal arts component. He had been just as 
convinced, however, that this was a matter to be worked out by 
the campus itself. He still felt these concerns, he said, but 
he also felt a concern for the continuing divisiveness on the 
campus and a desire for the atmosphere of trust mentioned by 
Professor Brown. He added that he was gratified that progress 
in developing the implementation plan had been made since the 
meeting of the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee. 

Trustee Gordon sensed, and shared, a great craving on 
the Boston campus for a stability that it had never had in its 
ten years of life. In response to Secretary Parks 's comment, he 
said he believed that the urban mission was a University commit- 
ment, not a college commitment. The mission would stay the same, 
only the structure was to change. He said he would oppose any 
diminution of the urban mission. 

Trustee Breyer said that this was clearly an issue on 
which reasonable people could disagree. There seemed to be 
agreement, however, that the system had not worked, and he sug- 
gested that it sometimes takes courage to admit that a system has 
not worked, that it is a normal reaction to say that more time is 
needed to give it a chance. Speaking to Secretary Parks ' s 
remarks, he observed that he knew universities with ten or fif- 
teen colleges which did not attempt to address the urban community 
He did not see how two colleges got the University closer to this 
objective than one. He expressed the opinion that a system which 
would permit faculty to spend less time on committees and more 
time in class seemed to him a good thing. 



I 



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I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Cronin called for the Trustees to think of 
students as consumers of higher education. Seen in this light, 
the students' overwhelming rejection of the merger should be 
taken seriously. 

Trustee Dennis said that most parties seemed in agree- 
ment on the objectives of the merger, but were divided on the 
process. Apparently, he said, much progress had been made 
since the Committee meeting to mollify concerns about the pro- 
cess. He said he would vote for the proposal, and added that 
the implementation of the proposal would show whether he had 
voted correctly. 

Trustee Troy said he would hate to see the proposal 
tabled, because he believed that the campus would be no more 
together in a month's time than it was today. He said the dis- 
cussion at the Committee meeting had been full, even distin- 
guished. He described the merger as an opportunity for a re- 
definition of liberal education. 

Trustee Troy said he did not agree that this restruc- 
turing would threaten the urban character of the campus. He 
took issue with the suggestion that the merger would take away 
the faculty's hard-earned gains, and pointed out that the fac- 
ulty was divided right down the middle on this issue: as many 
favored the merger as opposed it. He said he felt that the 
Chancellor's statement about the guiding principles of the imple- 
mentation of the merger would have a healing effect on the divi- 
sive atmosphere of the campus. 

Chairman Healey said he did not believe there was 
magic in structure: the main issue in a merger such as this 
was what effect it would have on people. He revealed that he 
had felt at first that this issue was perhaps not ripe for 
Trustee action but, after a long conversation with Trustee Troy 
and a careful examination of the Chancellor's implementation 
memorandum, he was convinced that to wait might aggravate the 
divisiveness on the campus. He was prepared to accept the judg- 
ment of the Chancellor. Sometimes, he remarked, it is necessary 
for the Trustees to make hard decisions. 

Trustee Robertson took strong exception to the implica- 
tion which he said had been made in several statements made 
earlier: that if the Trustees do not agree with the students, 
they are guilty of not listening to them. As a Trustee, he 
said, he listens as carefully as he can, then makes a decision 
on his own best judgment. 

Trustee Morgenthau said she would vote against the 
merger. Though she was encouraged by the evident progress with 
respect to implementation since the Committee meeting, she still 
was not convinced that sufficient efforts had been made to 



4 83 



Board 
4-7-76 



4 84 



Board 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

achieve a consensus. She said the energy of the opposition 
had apparently stimulated the steps toward reconciliation that 
had been taken, and added that she intended to keep up the oppo- 
sition. She saw no holiness in structure, but she believed 
feelings were important, and she saw greater sanctity in the 
investment of individuals over the years in building a structure. 
If the process from here on really took into account all shades 
of opinion on the campus, perhaps something would be accomplished 
She hoped that this would happen. 

Trustee Burack said she was encouraged that there was 
now an implementation plan, but she said she could not vote on 
a plan she had not seen. The Chancellor's plan must be seen and 
studied by the Trustees, in her view. She said she was not con- 
vinced that everything possible had been done to rectify the 
several problems described earlier — student services, cross- 
registration, interdisciplinary programs, etc. — within the con- 
text of the present system. 

Trustee Croce expressed his feeling of reassurance at 
the Chancellor's statement, and said he believed that the guide- 
lines for implementation that he had described would bring the 
campus together. 

Trustee Rothenburger 

MOVED : That the merger be tabled until the plan that 
will show the positive effects that the merger 
will have on the academic and student support 
services is fully discussed by the Harbor Campus 
and Park Square Community, and that at the 
April 1977 meeting of the Board of Trustees 
the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee 
review the plan and recommend or not recommend 
the merger. 

The motion was seconded and, upon a vote, failed. The 
main motion was seconded and it was 



VOTED : To accept the recommendation of the Chancellor 
of the Boston campus that a single college of 
liberal arts be established by the merger of 
Colleges I and II, provided that the imple- 
mentation of the merger take place giving 
first priority to the resolution of student 
problems, including effective response to 
their needs and the expansion of their oppor- 
tunities; provided further that the imple- 
mentation of the merger should be flexible, 
taking appropriate account of differing pro- 
cedures and differing patterns of development 
over the past five years; and provided further 
that the plan for implementation be circulated 
to the Board of Trustees prior to such imple- 
mentation. 



i 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Nay votes were cast by Trustees Morgenthau, Burack, 
McNeil, Rothenburger , Cronin and Secretary Parks. 

Chairman Healey reported that campus security officers 
had advised that the meeting be ended as soon as possible. He 
therefore asked Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on 
Budget and Finance, to offer five motions with respect to the 
proposed Management and Maintenance Agreement at UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T76-048A), a Health Maintenance Organization at UM/Amherst 
the extension of University Health Services at UM/Amherst, a 
proposed Media Services Trust Fund at UM/Boston (Doc. T76-057) 
and a proposed course fee for the summer session at UM/Boston. 
The motions were seconded and it was 

VOTED : (1) That the vote of March 3, 1976 pertaining 
to the proposed Management and Maintenance 
Agreement with the Student Family Housing 
Cooperative be rescinded, and (2) that the 
Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst be authorized to execute a Manage- 
ment and Maintenance Agreement (as set forth 
in Doc. T76-048A) with the Student Family 
Housing Cooperative, for the management and 
operation of student family housing facilities 
at the Amherst campus; provided , that said 
Agreement shall not be executed except upon 
the following conditions: (a) the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority shall 
have been informed of the proposed Agreement 
and, upon review, shall not have stated any 
objection thereto or disapproval thereof; 
(b) a majority of the present tenants of such 
student family housing facilities shall have 
expressed their concurrence to this Agreement 
and the related rules and regulations for 
tenants; and (c) the Chancellor shall have 
determined that all monies now in the posses- 
sion of either the University of Massachusetts 
Tenants' Association or the Student Family 
Housing Cooperative, which monies constitute 
rental due to the University but have been 
withheld, have been remitted to the University. 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the Amherst 
campus and the Treasurer of the University 
to enter into a contract or contracts with 
the Valley Health Plan, Inc., a Health 
Maintenance Organization, and Amherst Med- 
ical Associates, a private medical group 
practice, to establish an HMO through which 
faculty, staff, and their dependents may 
receive comprehensive health care services 
on a prepaid basis . 



4085 



Board 
4-7-76 



UM/Amherst — 
Management and 
Maintenance 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-048A) 



UM/Amherst — 
Health Mainte- 
nance Organiza- 
tion 
(Doc. T76-052) 



4086 

Board 
4-7-76 

UM/ Amherst — 
University 
Health Services 



UM/ Bo st on — 
Media Services 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T76-057) 



UM/Boston — 
Summer Session 
Course Fee 
(Doc. T76-054) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the administration of the Amherst 
Campus to extend the existing student health 
program to provide for the optional inclusion 
of dependents of students for an additional 
fee; provided, however, no such extension 
shall be implemented until the fee has been 
determined and approved by the Board of Trustees. 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University 
to establish a Media Services Trust Fund for 
the Boston campus, said trust fund to consist 
of fees, charges or rentals assessed for use 
of equipment or facilities of the Media Center 
at the Boston campus in connection with contracts 
made for production and related services, and 
available overhead payments and any other monies 
made available for the purpose by gift, grant 
or bequest; funds held in such trust fund may 
be disbursed for repair and maintenance of 
equipment at said Media Center, for the pur- 
chase of supplies, furnishings and additional 
equipment, for salaries and other remuneration 
of personnel engaged in production services 
at the Media Center and for related expenses, 
all as more particularly set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-057. 

VOTED : To establish a course fee for the summer 
session at the Harbor Campus at the rate 
of $25.00 per credit hour. 

There was no further business to come before the Board, 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 6:30 p.m. 



I 



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\Ojbl\- 




rladys* Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



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ATTENDANCE : 



! 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 5, 1976; 1:00 p.m. 
Twenty-first Floor Conference Room 
One Ashburton Place 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Croce, Cronin, Dennis, Eddy, 
Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, 
Shaler, Spiller, Troy, Winthrop, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig, Mrs. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin, Mrs. Bluestone rep- 
resenting Trustee Fielding and Secretary Parks representing Trus- 
tee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, As- 
sistant Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Abrams and Shearer 



Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management: 
and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, Exec- 
utive Assistant to the President; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice Pres- 
ident for Analytical Studies; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President 
for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Searson, 
General Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 



Student Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative; 
Mr. Martus, Co-President of the Student Government Association; 
Mr. Melley, Director of Public Affairs 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 



Control; Mr. Larner , Director of Public Affairs; Professor Gaffney, 
Faculty Observer 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty 



Representative 

Guests : Theresa Conti, Student Trustee-elect, UM/Boston; Susan 



Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 1:15 p.m. Chairman 
Healey began by explaining the reason for the location of the 
meeting at the John W. McCormack State Office Building. He said 
the verbal abuse and physical intimidation experienced by some 
Trustees at the last two meetings on the Amherst campus brought 
about this change. He hoped this would be temporary, he said, but 
until he received positive assurance from faculty, students and 
administration that these problems would not arise again, the 
Board would not hold its meetings on the campuses. 



4087 



Chairman's 
Remarks 



Board 
5/5/76 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



Introduction 
of new Student 
Trustee-elect 



Remarks of 
the President 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He continued that the problems with which the Trustees 
must deal are complicated, and action is considered and taken only 
after a lengthy process of study by Committees and advice from 
administrators. Some Trustee decisions are unpopular — tuition, 
for example. It would have been easy for the Board to have taken 
no action on tuition, in deference to the strong opposition to a 
raise on the part of students. But it is the responsibility of 
the Board to remember the interests of the Commonwealth as a whole 
and to remember that it receives an annual appropriation in excess 
of $100 million. It cannot responsibly flout the sentiments of 
the Legislature and the public. 

As for the conduct exhibited at the previous Trustee 
meetings, the Chairman said the meetings of the Board of Trustees 
are not town meetings, with guaranteed participation by all who 
attend. Participation of non-Trustees is by permission of the 
Board and only after due procedure. Review of policy proposals 
takes place on the campuses, then in the President's office, then 
before appropriate Committees of the Board, and comes before the 
full Board only when it is ripe for action. Student and faculty 
participation in these policy developments cannot start at a meet- 
ing of the full Board. 

He said that if the governance system were defective, 
as had been charged by some, then the proper action was to re- 
examine that process. Faculty and students are not natural adver- 
saries, he said, and he hoped that the proper spirit of cooperation 
and understanding can be re-established, and that the Trustees car: 
return to the campuses as soon as possible. 

The Chairman then submitted the minutes of the previous 
meeting. There were no amendments or corrections, and it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of April 7, 
1976. 

Chairman Healey called the Board's attention to the 
presence of Ms. Theresa Conti, the new Student Trustee-elect from 
the Boston campus. Trustee Rothenburger would serve for this 
meeting, he explained, and Ms. Conti would be sworn in in time to 
act as Trustee for the June meeting. Chairman Healey then called 
on President Wood. 



The President began by informing the Board that the 
Student Government Association at UM/Amherst had invited him to 
address the Student Senate. He said he was grateful for this in- 
vitation, and remained ready to respond to such invitations by 
any campus constituencies. The President then thanked the build- 
ing superintendent, his staff and Chief Doherty for the arrange- 
ments for the Board meeting. He then called on Chancellor Bromery 



I 



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4C89 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery informed the Board that he had gather- 
ed information about the disturbances at the April 7 meeting. 
With regard to a set of demands sent to all Trustees and signed 
by four members of student government, he observed that this letter 
did not pass through the Chancellor's office in accordance with 
the governance procedure. He said he intended to make a formal 
response to the letter. 

The Chancellor said there was a need for better communi 
cation through the campus mass media of the procedures by which 
campus constituencies may make representations to the Board. He 
observed that the University Bulletin had served as a useful orgah 
of communication from the administration to the campus but that 
the Bulletin was not now publishing because of the budget crises 
of last year. 

Finally, Chancellor Bromery announced that six persons 
would receive honorary degrees from the Amherst campus at com- 
mencement: Germaine Bree, James U. Crockett, Sarah Caldwell, Johji 
W. Haigis, Allan Morgan and Carl T. Rowan. Mr. Rowan would be 
the commencement speaker. 

Secretary Parks raised the issue of student access to 
the Board. He agreed on the whole that a meeting with an agenda 
should not become a forum for unrestricted debate. But there was 
a natural desire, he said, for students to want to address the 
Board when assembled as a whole, rather than through Committees. 
There ought to be a mechanism for this to take place. 

Chairman Healey and Trustee Spiller said there was such 
a mechanism and that, even though some twenty students and facult; 
spoke to the Board at the April meeting, there were still accusa- 
tions that the Trustees do not listen. Trustee Shaler said that, 
in principle, he cautioned against violating the spirit of order- 
ly governance by making a clear path between the Board and all 
who might wish to address it. 

Chancellor Bromery observed that many of the problems 
which people seek to bring before the Board can and should be re- 
solved at the campus level. The Chancellor replied that ultimate 
power resides at the Trustee level, but the Chancellor is more 
than a mere conduit. He has a certain amount of authority on the 
campus . 

Trustee McNeil said it was important for the students 
to have access to the Trustees, and she said she hoped that the 
Board would return to the campuses soon. There was a feeling of 
distance between the Trustees and the campuses which should not 
be exacerbated by meeting far from the campuses. She said she wa& 
concerned with the safety of Trustees, but at the same time did 
not wish to overreact. There did seem to be a lack of clarity on 
the campuses with respect to the proper procedure with respect to 



Board 
5/5/76 

UM/ Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



4090 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



Old Business 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

addressing the Board. 

Trustee Cronin said he had endeavored to educate persons 
on the campus to the fact that most of the work on issues takes 
place on the campus, then before Committees of the Board. He sai> 
however, that when there is an information gap it becomes diffi- 
cult to operate within the system. He said the merging of the 
Office of Veterans' Affairs with the Financial Aid Office, for 
example, was carried out without consultation with veterans. It 
is difficult to respond to such issues when the students do not 
know about them until they are on a Committee agenda. 

Trustee Robertson said that this was only partially a 
governance problem. But no amount of communication will change 
one thing: no plan will work without top management support. The 
Board should hold all levels responsible for hearing input from 
students, so that fewer issues would come to the Board. 

President Wood recognized Chancellor Golino for his re- 
marks. Chancellor Golino reported first on the progress of the 
reunification of Colleges I and II at the Boston campus. He in- 
formed the Board that a Committee to oversee the process had been 
established, members had been appointed, and the charge had been 
given. He then read the charge of the Committee on Unification. 
The Committee had met twice, he said, and he hoped to have an im- 
plementation plan to present to the Trustees next week. He then 
introduced Professor Matthew Gaffney to present certain information 
on behalf of the UM/Boston faculty. 



Professor Gaffney read the results of a poll on confi- 
dence in Chancellor Golino taken in the College I Senate. The 
full-time faculty of College I was 54.9 percent confident. 

Chancellor Bulger said he was pleased for once to have 
nothing more earth-shaking to report than that two lady medical 
students had finished first and third in a Worcester ten-mile 
foot race. One male student had finished well enough to qualify 
for the Boston Marathon. 

Chairman Healey brought up the April meeting again in 
connection with several votes taken at the end of the meeting. 
These votes, he said, could not have been postponed to the May 
meeting because they affected summer school fees, married student 
housing which called for a poll of the tenants, and the HMO, whicji 
involved negotiations for a federal grant with a deadline. At 
the same time, there had not been enough time to discuss them be- 
cause the campus public safety chief had advised him to conclude 
the meeting due to continued student disturbance. There had been 
inquiries with respect to the HMO at Amherst from Trustee Eddy 
and Chancellor Bromery would respond directly to her. He added 
that progress in the development of the HMO would be reported to 
the Board in the future. 



i 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey then said that some agenda items had 
been postponed from the April meeting. They had all been part of 
the report of the Committee on Budget and Finance and he then 
recognized Chairman Carlson to introduce these actions. 

Trustee Carlson proposed the establishment of the 
Babette Schiller Spiegel Memorial Fund at UM/Boston (Doc. T76- 
053). There was a question about the size of the fund, and Treas- 
urer Johnson said there was at present about $6,000 available but 
substantial additional funds were anticipated. Upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University to es- 
tablish the Babette Schiller Spiegel Memorial Fund 
for the purposes set forth in Trustee Document T76- 
053; further that the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston be designated as the offi- 
cer of the University to act in consultation with 
the Advisory Committee as more particularly set forth 
in said Trustee Document. 

Trustee Carlson introduced the General Summer Session 
Trust Funds for UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston. He explained that the 
campuses could not afford to continue offering a summer session 
supported from the operating budgets, and faced the choice of lev- 
ying a fee for summer courses or discontinuing the summer sessions 
because the state appropriation does not acknowledge the cost of 
academic programs offered in the summer. The Board had voted a 
$25 fee for the summer session at UM/Boston at the April meeting. 
This action would establish the Trust Funds for the collection of 
these fees at both campuses. One of the advantages of charging 
the fee would be to make it financially feasible to attract addi- 
tional students. In response to a question from Trustee Burack, 
it was explained that the fee was competitive with similar fees 
charged by private institutions. 

Trustee Shaler reported that Trustee Rothenburger had 
expressed concern about the precedent-setting nature of this pro- 
posal when it had been discussed at the meeting of the Committee 
on Student Affairs. The Committee had been assured that charging 
a fee was a last resort, said Trustee Shaler, and he said he hoped 
that it would be the last time it would be necessary. A motion 
was made and seconded and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University to es- 
tablish an Amherst campus General Summer Session 
Trust Fund to be used to implement a fee-assisted 
summer session at said campus. The Trust Fund shall 
be used for the collection of the course fees estab- 
lished by the Board of Trustees and for the payment 
of all direct instructional costs of the summer ses- 
sion program; further, to direct the administration 



4091 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Boston— 
Babette 
Schiller 
Spiegel 
Memorial Fund 
(Doc. T76-053) 



General Summer 
Session Trust 
Funds 



4032 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Boston — 
Health 
Services Fee 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Need-Based 

Tuition Waiver 

Policy 

(Doc. T76-071) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the Amherst campus to conduct a review of the 
said fee-assisted summer session and to report back 
to the Board in the fall of 1976. 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer of the University to es- 
tablish a UM/Boston General Summer Trust Fund to be 
used to implement a fee-assisted summer session at 
said campus. The Trust Fund shall be used for the 
collection of the course fees established by the 
Board of Trustees and for the payment of all direct 
instructional costs of the summer session program; 
further, to direct the administration of the Boston 
campus to conduct a review of the said fee-assisted 
summer session and to report back to the Board in 
the fall of 1976. 

The next unfinished matter to be presented by Trustee 
Carlson was a Health Services Fee at UM/Boston. This proposal 
would levy a health fee for part-time students equal to 50 percen 
of that paid by full-time students, and would establish the fee 
in the same relative proportions for graduate students. A dis- 
cussion arose as to whether a student taking only one course would 
have to pay this fee, and it was admitted that such a student wou^ 
After discussion, it was agreed that the motion should be amended 
so that the Chancellor could handle extraordinary cases adminis- 
tratively. A motion was made and seconded and it was 

VOTED : That commencing with the 1976-77 Academic Year, all 
part-time graduate and undergraduate students at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston be required to 
pay a health service fee in the amount of 50% of the 
health service fee required of full-time students; 
further, that full-time graduate students be required 
to pay the same health service fee required of full- 
time undergraduate students; provided , that the afor 
said fees shall be authorized for the 1976-77 Academ- 
ic Year only, and that the administration of the 
Boston campus be directed to review the said fee and 
to report to the Board no later than its April meet- 
ing, 1977, on the feasibility of having said fee 
optional for part-time students. The Chancellor of 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston shall be 
and is hereby authorized to waive the fee to be paid 
by part-time graduate and undergraduate students at 
his discretion. 



Having concluded the unfinished business from the pre- 
vious Board meeting, the Chairman next turned to the reports of 
the standing Committees. He called on President Wood to report 
for the Executive Committee. President Wood addressed first the 
proposed Need-Based Tuition Waiver Policy (Doc. T76-071) . He 
commented that this proposal had been reviewed by two other Com- 



I 



I 



4093 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

mittees of the Board — the Student Affairs Committee and the Budget 
and Finance Committee. The proposal was a response to the Board's 
vote of December 1975, which had made it a condition of the tuitiojn 
increases to establish a program which would meet the financial 
needs of students. At the time, insufficient information about 
student need and the magnitude of federal resources was available 
and this proposal was based on the information which had been 
gathered since December in these areas. Since this issue had been 
ventilated before two Committees, the President called on Trustee 
Shaler to speak for the Student Affairs Committee and Trustee 
Carlson to speak for the Budget and Finance Committee. 



Trustee Shaler observed that tuition waivers had been 
awarded for many years, but mainly as compensation and not as 
financial aid. This proposal would provide for their use as finar 
cial aid. He said that the proposal would be beneficial for all 
campuses, but particularly so for the medical students on the 
Worcester campus since the Health Professions scholarship and loar 
program had recently been eliminated. 

Trustee Carlson explained that the thorough discussion 
of the proposal by the Budget and Finance Committee was fully 
recorded in the minutes, but he did say that it had centered arou 
the means by which need was estimated, and whether the projected 
$250,000 worth of tuition waivers would be adequate. Although 
there had been lamentably little response to the Student Resources 
Survey, the computations made had convinced the Committee that the. 
calculation of need had been carefully made. There had, however, 
been some concern on the part of Trustee Cronin about the lack of 
survey data, and he had promised to work to publicize the need for 
students to provide this information in order to ensure adequate 
aid to meet their need. 

Trustee Carlson explained that this was a one-year pro- 
gram, because it was impossible to know at this time the extent 
of federal aid available after the next academic year. This was 
aimed at the first step increase for 1976-77, after which the 
facts and figures of subsequent federal aid would be reviewed and 
adjustments made if necessary, prior to the next step increase. 

The Budget and Finance Committee was satisfied that this 
waiver policy proposal would satisfy the needs of those students 
pressed by the tuition increase who are largely ineligible for 
existing programs of financial aid. 

The President told the Board that, while this proposal 
satisfied the needs of resident students, it could not assist nonr 
resident students who still have serious problems. He was deeply 
concerned about the provinciality of the Legislature's action in 
penalizing nonresident students. For this provincialism to invad£ 
University life was harmful to the contribution of the national 
and international communities at the University, and was there- 



Board 
5/5/76 



4024 



Board 

5/5/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



fore deplorable, 
problem. 



He promised to work for some solution to this 



At the President's request, Mrs. Hanson spoke about the 
proposal. The major portion of financial aid available to students, 
she explained, was from federal funding. The good news on this 
point was that such aid should rise in 1976-77 by $1.2 million, it 
was hoped, to $10.5 million. Since this aid would cover the total 
cost for many students, efforts had been concentrated on relieving 
the needs of those students not covered by such aid — mainly those 
in the low-middle-income bracket. Between 1,000 and 1,300 students 
would not be eligible for federal aid and, since the average amount 
of aid requested by students was $250, the total estimated unmet 
need would be approximately $250,000. The administrative process 
to be followed was: the capacity to waive tuition up to a certain 
amount would be allocated directly to the financial aid offices 
of the campuses. When a student applied for aid, the office would 
compute his or her need, apply all available resources, and if 
there were still a gap would then dispense a waiver. 

Trustee Cronin remarked that a thousand students needing 
financial aid seemed a low figure, and Mrs. Hanson explained that 
most students needing financial aid would be covered by federal 
and state aid. The 1,000 to 1,300 represented students who had 
not received aid before and who would be ineligible for this aid 
due to federal restrictions on eligibility of those whose incomes 
exceed a ceiling. With regard to medical students, Mrs. Hanson 
said that there would be a decline in the health professions grants, 
and that the estimates of the needs for tuition waivers for medical 
students should be revised upward from twenty to between thirty 
and forty students. Chairman Healey reminded the Board that the 
figure of $250,000 was a best estimate. The goal of the proposal 
was to ensure that no student be denied access to the University 
because of the tuition increase. 

Trustee Burack noted that a previous action of the Board 
had eliminated tuition waivers as compensation for residence hall 
counselors. This troubled her, she said, because she believed 
that counseling services and the lack thereof were of great concern 
to most students. Trustee Shaler reviewed the history of Doc. T75- 
075B. The University, he explained, had never before had a coherent 
policy for tuition waivers, but had granted them on an ad hoc basis. 
Much tuition revenue had been lost due to the increased dispensa- 
tion of waivers. Former Associate Vice President Keith had conduct- 
ed a study and devised a policy which had clearly reformulated 
and greatly reduced the number and types of tuition waivers which, 
could be granted as compensation. Chairman Healey reiterated that 
the entire tuition waiver picture would need to be reviewed by 
next year and he asked that waivers granted as compensation also 
be included in this assessment. 

Trustee Rothenburger said he had hoped for a "stepped" 



i 



I 



4095 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tuition waiver proposal to offset the effects of the tuition in- 
crease, but he thanked the Trustees and the President for ful- 
filling their commitment to devise a financial aid program. He 
said it was quite satisfactory as a pilot program. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To establish and approve a program of financial need- 
based tuition waivers to be administered by the Fi- 
nancial Aid Offices in accordance with the guideline^ 
set forth in Trustee Document T76-071 provided that 
the standard need analysis referred to on page 12 of 
said document shall conform to federally approved 
procedures; further that said program shall be reviei? 
ed as part of an overall review of University tuitioiji 
waiver programs and shall be revised as appropriate. 

President Wood introduced the proposed Concurrence in 
Appointment of Dean of College of Food and Natural Resources at 
UM/ Amherst (Doc. T76-076) . The President informed the Board that! 
this was the first in a series of such actions. Since the campuses 
are presently engaged in searches for several deans, the appoint-! 
ment of deans, who are academic officers of the University, would 
require, according to the Governance Statement, the concurrence 
of the Board. He added that he would be presenting to the Board 
at its next meeting the context of the general schedule of execu- 
tive compensation for deans. As for this specific appointment, 
the selection process had been careful and lengthy. Because the 
College of Food and Natural Resources had a complicated interface 
with the Department of Food and Agriculture and other state agen- 
cies, Trustee Winthrop, Commissioner of Food and Agriculture and 
his colleagues in the Department had been involved in the search 
process. He then called on Chancellor Bromery. Chancellor Bromefy 
praised Professor Whaley, presently at the University as Head of 
the Department of Landscape Architecture, and said the University 
had been fortunate to land him for this position, since he had 
been made attractive offers by the State of Colorado and by Purdu^ 
University. 

Trustee Winthrop told the Trustees that the Department 
depends heavily on the University. In fact, he said, the Depart- 
ment gets most of the credit for work done mostly by the University, 
Similar to concerns expressed at the time of his appointment as 
Commissioner, some traditional farmers had said that Professor 
whaley did not have a traditional farming background, but he had 
met with him and been impressed by his knowledge and interest. 
He was very pleased with this proposed appointment, he said, and 
he expressed his appreciation for having had the opportunity to 
be involved. 

A motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Dean of College 
of Food and f 
Natural 
Resources 
(Doc. T76-076) 



i 



4G2G 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/ Amherst and 
UM/Boston — 
Codes of Stu - 
dent Conduct 
(Docs. T73-005 
T73-006) 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 

Centralization 
and Organiza- 
tion of the 
University 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To concur with the President in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst of Dr. Ross S. Whaley as Dean of the Col- 
lege of Food and Natural Resources, Director of the 
Experiment Station and Director of the Extension 
Service effective August 1, 1976. 

President Wood next introduced the proposed reaffirmation 
of the Codes of Student Conduct at UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston (Docs. 
T73-005, T73-006). He explained that these had originally been 
adopted in 1966, and modified in 1972. Efforts were under way on 
both campuses to devise and put forward new codes, but in the in- 
terim he believed it was desirable for these codes to be reaffirmed. 
He added his hope that the new codes could be combined into a sin- 
gle University policy which would have portions applicable to cer- 
tain campuses. 



A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To reaffirm and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, 

UM/ Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T73-005; Motor Vehi- 
cle Rules and Regulations, UM/Amherst, as set forth 
in Doc. T75-155; and Rules and Regulations Relative 
to the Possession, Consumption and Sale of Alcoholic 
Beverages, UM/Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T74-081A. 

VOTED ; To reaffirm and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, 

UM/Boston, as set forth in Doc. T73-006; Motor Vehi- 
cle Rules, Regulations, and Traffic Signs, UM/Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T74-045A; and Policies and Pro- 
cedures Relative to the Consumption and Sale of Alco- 
holic Beverages, UM/Boston, as set forth in Doc. T75- 
015A. 

This completed the report of the Executive Committee, 
and Chairman Healey asked for the report of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy, chaired by Trustee Troy. Trustee 
Troy reported that the first item on the agenda of the April 21 
meeting had been a discussion of Centralization and Organization 
of the University, based on reports compiled by special committees 
of the three faculties. 



President Wood had begun by describing to the Committee 
the actions taken as a result of votes by the Board on June 4, 
1975 on limited interim implementation of some aspects of the Hay 
study. These actions had had to do with executive compensation 
and the establishment of committees to make recommendations with 
regard to organizational structure in management and business 
services. One of the results of these actions had been the ap- 
pointment of a Senior Vice President for Management and Business 
Affairs. 



i 



> 



I 



4097 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Janis had then made a presentation to the 
Committee, describing his views as to the proper degree of centrali- 
zation of such services as grant and contract administration, pay- 
roll, data processing, etc. He had expressed, among other things 
his concern with carrying out the Trustees' financial responsibil- 
ities, which required a clear understanding of who is responsible 
at each management level. 

There had been differing reactions to Mr. Janis 's remarks 
reported Trustee Troy. Some Trustees, he said, had felt that the 
purpose of the agenda item was to discuss the academic implications 
of the Hay study, not such matters as grants and contracts. Other|s 
had felt that management and academic matters could not be sepa- 
rated and should therefore be discussed together. The fear had 
been expressed that over-generous allotment of resources to manage 
ment would result in the deprivation of academic programs. 



Trustee Troy explained that the Committee had not delvec 
into the seventeen points of the Amherst report, because it had 
felt that it was not competent to resolve these questions. In the 
course of the Committees' discussion, it had been suggested that 
these differences should be worked out by the cooperative efforts 
of the faculty and the administration. It had been recommended 
that the faculties maintain standing committees on campus-central 
office relations, which might meet as a University-wide committee 
from time to time. It had been said by several people at the Com- 
mittee meeting that there was bound to be a certain amount of 
tension between the campus and the central office which could pro\ 
fruitful if properly channeled. It was hoped, said Trustee Troy, 
that these committees will be established soon and that they will 
devise a mandate to be presented to the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy in the near future. 



In this connection the Committee also discussed the status 
of faculty representation to the Board and the hope was expressed 
that this representation could be enhanced. 

After this portion of Trustee Troy's report, Trustee 
Dennis said that he had had difficulty when he had first joined 
the Board in understanding what the Hay report was about, and in 
understanding the areas in which the Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs would be working. He said he would like to 
be of assistance to Mr. Janis in these areas, since this was his 
training. Mr. Janis replied that the matter of grants and contracts 
would be on the May agenda of the Committee on Budget and Finance, 
and he noted that he and Mr. Dennis were to meet before the May 
meeting to discuss accounting. Trustee Dennis said he was refer- 
ring more generally to the Hay report, which he kept hearing about: 
in reports of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Chairman Healey said that centralization was a matter 
which cut across the work of several Committees of the Board. 



Board 
5/5/76 



4098 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Program 
Adjustments 
(Docs. T76-068, 
T76-069, and 
T76-070) 



UM/Amherst- 
Graduation 
Lists (Doc, 
T76-075) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Burack said that computers and accounting should never 
have been before the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee, 
but rather the Budget and Finance Committee. She said that a 
joint meeting of the two Committees might be a more useful way to 
get at a matter which was not only controversial but also clearly 
affected both management and academic concerns. Trustee Troy saic 
there had been disagreement on this very point at the meeting — 
whether management and academic affairs were separable. Chairman 
Healey proposed a joint meeting to go over the whole matter again, 
and said all Trustees should be invited. President Wood remarked 
that there had been comprehensive Board involvement in the Hay 
report and its recommendations. Trustee Dennis replied that the 
implications of the action of the June 4, 1975 Executive Committee 
meeting at which the Hay report had been discussed were not clearly 
understood. 

Trustee Troy next recommended three structural changes 
in academic programs at the Amherst campus which were reviewed by 
the Committee: Ph.D. Program in Spanish (Doc. T76-068) , Transfer 



of Department of Dance (Doc. T76-069) , and Department of Mechanical 
and Aerospace Engineering (Doc. T76-070) . The Ph.D. program in 



Spanish had been a Five-College degree, but its designation as a 
University of Massachusetts degree more accurately reflected its 
status. The long awaited transfer of the dance program from the 
School of Physical Education to the Faculty of Humanities and Fine 
Arts was greeted by a cheer from Trustee Rowland. There was no 
objection to those changes and it was 

VOTED : To redesignate the Five-College Cooperative Ph.D. 

Program in Spanish as a University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst Ph.D. Program in Spanish, as set forth in 
Doc. T76-068. 

VOTED : To approve the transfer of the Dance program of the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst from the 
School of Physical Education to the Faculty of 
Humanities and Fine Arts, as set forth in Doc. T76- 
069. Further, that the Department of Music be re- 
designated the Department of Music and Dance, and 
that the Department of Professional Preparation in 
Physical Education and Dance be redesignated the 
Department of Professional Preparation in Physical 
Education. 

VOTED : To redesignate the Department of Mechanical and 

Aerospace Engineering in the School of Engineering 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering, as set forth 
in Doc. T76-070. 

Trustee Troy then moved the approval of the Preliminary 
Graduation Lists at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-075) . There was a second 



and it was 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the Preliminary Graduation Lists for the 
May 1976 commencement at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T76-075, sub- 
ject to the completion of all requirements as certi- 
fied by the Recorder of that campus. 

This completed the report of the Committee's April meet 

ing, and since Trustee Troy was unable to complete his report on 

the March Committee meeting, because the April 7 Board meeting 
had been cut short, he proceeded to do so. 

The final item at the March 31 Committee meeting had 
been discussion of a report of the Special Committee on the Future 
School of Education at UM/ Amherst. This report had urged that the 
School of Education maintain a comprehensive program, while at the 
same time cutting back in certain areas, such as pre-service teacr 
er education. It was urged that over the next five years under- 
graduate majors in the School should drop from 800 to 400. 

The Committee on the Future School, he said, had also 
written that in-service education, education for working teachers, 
was vitally needed and the School could make a great contribution 
in this area. Doctoral programs, too, should be maintained since 
the School has an impressive record for its doctoral degree recip- 
ients. It was, however, recommended that the number of doctoral 
candidates and master degree candidates be reduced. 

Trustee Troy reported that Trustee Anrig, who had servec 
on the Committee on the Future School, had agreed with much of 
what Professor Mellen, the Chairman of that Committee, had said. 
He stressed the importance of remembering that, despite the pain 
and distress of the recent events at the School, great progress 
has been made in the School over the School of Education of two 
decades ago. The problems that had occurred in the School should 
not undermine the progress and promise of recent years. Trustee 
Anrig, who is Commissioner of Education, had agreed with the im- 
portance of maintaining the doctoral programs, and had added that 
pre-service teacher training should be reduced elsewhere in the 
University, as well. The school should focus upon the existing 
teacher force. 

Trustee Troy, continuing his report, said that Trustee 
Anrig commended the School for reaching out to students that other 
schools of education had never reached, and praised the school foi 
its continuing commitment to minority students. He had also sug- 
gested that the School tone down its rhetoric while maintaining 
its ambitions. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Alfange had then thanked the mem^j 
bers of the Committee for their report, and had emphasized that 
one of the prime goals of the University administration was to in- 
tegrate the School of Education into the rest of the University, 



4099 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/ Amherst — 
School of 
Education 



4100 



Board 
5/5/76 



Report of 
Committee on 
Long-Range 
Planning 



Research and 
Field Stations 



Health 
Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

particularly in the areas of University-wide standards. 

This completed the report of the Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy, and Chairman Healey recognized Trustee 
Rowland for the report of the Committee on Long-Range Planning. 
The Committee had met on April 20 to undertake the beginning of a 
review of University research and field stations and of health 
planning. 

The President had expressed his concern to the Committee 
for the need to plan and review the missions of the field stations 
along with their integration into the educational service programs 
of the University. Trustee Rowland said that in initiating its 
review, the Committee had invited Dean Arless Spielman of the Col- 
lege of Food and Natural Resources to present a picture of each 
of the stations. The college had administrative responsibility 
for five of the stations. Dean Spielman provided summary data on 
the budgets and programs of the stations. 

Trustee Rowland said she suspected that Trustees were 
largely unfamiliar with the University's outposts — Belchertown, 
Wareham, Waltham, South Deerfield, Gloucester, etc. — and with the 
continuing service that they provide to the Commonwealth. 

She said she had had occasion over the years to witness 
the fine work done by the Cranberry Experiment Station at Wareham 
and could attest to its usefulness. 



The Long-Range Planning Committee had also discussed the 
potential uses of the Gloucester Marine Sciences Station, for which 
some capital improvement money is available, and had had a report 
from Chancellor Golino on the uses and present activities of the 
Nantucket station. Chancellor Golino had promised to provide a 
more extensive report in the fall. 

The Committee had next turned to the subject of health 
planning and had heard a wide-ranging report from Chancellor Bulger 
on future program directions of the Medical Center. Trustee Row- 
land reported that he stressed the growing importance of residency 
training programs, not only in the University Hospital, but also 
in other Worcester-area hospitals. He had also reviewed a number 
of interesting possibilities in non-physician training programs 
in cooperation with public and private institutions in Worcester 
and elsewhere. 



The Committee had been impressed by these possibilities 
and by the Chancellor's interest in cooperative arrangements. The 
Committee had reiterated the importance of the Medical Center not 
becoming over-extended in terms of cost and commitment and the 
importance of proceeding within a defined set of priorities. 

Concluding her report, Trustee Rowland said she did not 



I 



I 



\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

expect these agenda items to yield formal proposals for the Board 
in the near future, but she saw both health planning and the futur 
of the research and field stations as areas of considerable impor 
tance in shaping the long-term directions of the University. She 
looked forward to the Committee's continuing work in these areas. 

Following this report, Trustee Gordon commented that the 
field stations and their uses was a subject which had come up be- 
fore and been discussed without any action being taken in the end 
He hoped that follow-up could take place. Trustee Rowland replied 
that the Committee planned to continue its study of the field sta- 
tions for several months before bringing its proposal to the Board 



ort 



Chairman Healey next recognized Trustee Spiller to rep 
for the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. The first item of hi 
report was the John F. Kennedy Library Land Transfer. He describ 
the parcel of land at the Harbor Campus which was to be deeded to 
the General Services Administration of the federal government. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of a pending specia 
act of the Legislature, to authorize the President of 
the University to execute a deed and such other doc- 
uments as may be necessary to effectuate a conveyance 
of the parcel of land at the Harbor Campus described 
in the Act to the United States of America to provide 
a site for the presidential archival depository of 
the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library. 

Trustee Spiller informed the Trustees that Secretary of 
State Guzzi had been holding discussions with the University on 
the plan to build the new state Archives building on the Harbor 
Campus. The new building would be erected at a capital cost of 
$10 million, although perhaps not for several years. Trustee 
Spiller commented on what a marvelous resource these Archives 
would be for scholarly research in this location. 

The next item was a proposed Bus Transit Agreement/ 
Storage Facility at UM/ Amherst (Doc. T76-074) . Trustee Spiller 
said it involved the expansion of the University's fare-free bus 
service in the Pioneer Valley in and around Amherst. Trustee 
Eddy told the Board that the Town of Amherst was happy to cooper- 
ate with the University in its provision of this service, the cost 
of which was 50 percent reimbursable by the federal government. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, in consultation with the 
President of the University, to negotiate and execute; 
an agreement with the Town of Amherst, to submit with 
the Town of Amherst a joint petition to the Pioneer 
Valley Transit Authority for the funding and operation 



4101 



Board 
5/5/76 



Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

UM/Boston — 

Kennedy 

Library 



UM/Boston — 
State Archives 



UM/ Amherst — 
Bus Transit 
(Doc. T76-074) 



4102 



Board 
5/5/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of a transit system, and to negotiate and execute 
operating contracts with the Pioneer Valley Transit 
Authority to provide bus services as described in 
the agreement with the Town of Amherst, the joint 
petition and Trustee Document T76-074. 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University of 

Massachusetts at Amherst, in consultation with the 
President of the University, to negotiate with the 
Pioneer Valley Transit Authority for the submission 
of an application for funds to acquire buses to re- 
place and expand the existing bus fleet, for the con' 
struction of a bus maintenance facility, and for the 
use of land at the Amherst Campus for the construc- 
tion and operation of said bus maintenance facility, 
as described in Trustee Document T76-074. 



Chairman Healey asked Trustee Shaler if he wished to re- 
port for the Committee on Student Affairs, but Trustee Shaler ob- 
served that since most of the issues, such as new fees, which had 
come before his Committee required action by the Budget and Finance 
Committee, he would forego a report. Therefore the Chairman called 
for the report of Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on 
Budget and Finance. 

Trustee Carlson first addressed proposed Fund Transfers 



I 



Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

DM/ Amherst — 

Fund Transfers at UM/Amherst, Boston and Worcester (Doc. T76-072) . There was no 

(Doc. T76-072) discussion, and after a motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the fund transfers as set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-072. 



I 



UM/Amherst — 
New Fees and 
Fee Changes 
(Doc. T76-073) 



Fidelity Bond 



Trustee Carlson next turned to New Fees and Fee Changes 
at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-073) . He reminded the Board that 25 per- 
cent of the operating budget of the Amherst campus is based on 
fees. In order to write the fee-based budget for FY 1977, there- 
fore, it is necessary to make adjustments in the fees to reflect 
the operating costs of the services they support. Though the 
University strives to keep the fees down, he said, there was no 
way to keep down the cost of fee-based services. A motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the new fees and fee changes as detailed 
in Trustee Document T76-073 (with the exception of 
the Late Registration Fee) and as recommended by the 
Committee on Budget and Finance in the fifteen votes 
on new fees and fee changes approved by the Committee 
on April 20, 1976. 

The next matter mentioned by Trustee Carlson was a pre- 
sentation regarding the University's Fidelity Bond. Mr. Paul Cook 
of the Fidelity Deposit Company of Maryland had recommended an in- 



I 



4103 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

crease in the coverage of the bond to $500,000, at a cost of $486 
per year. Mr. Cook had also recommended that coverage be changed 
to provide first dollar coverage rather than a deductible basis, 
in view of the growth of the University and the small individual 
losses. Treasurer Johnson had been authorized to purchase the 
additional coverage, and also to arrange, if possible, to have th«: 
policy re-rated to a reduced cash exposure. 

Treasurer Johnson had also advised the Committee that 
the Executive Committee of the University of Massachusetts Foun- 
dation was recommending to the Foundation's directors the estab- 
lishment of a deferred giving program to increase funds in future 
years from individuals, trusts and other nonstate sources. 

Finally, Trustee Carlson reported that Secretary Hardy 
had reported to the Committee on the results of a poll taken of 
the inhabitants of married students housing at UM/ Amherst, in 
accordance with the vote in April of the Board requiring such a 
poll before the Management and Maintenance Agreement (Doc. T76- 
048A) authorized at the meeting could take effect. The Trustee 
vote had provided that a majority of the inhabitants would have t(j> 
agree to the management plan. A majority was 192 of 382 tenants, 
but only 146 had agreed. Therefore a majority had not concurred. 

This concluded Trustee Carlson's report, and Chairman 
Healey asked Trustee Troy to report in his capacity as Delegate 
to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Troy reported that the 
Board of Higher Education had met on April 16, April 27 and May 
3 and devoted itself largely to the subject of reorganization of 
higher education. The substance of these meetings, he said, was 
so complex that he could not fairly summarize it. 

A subcommittee of the BHE had been meeting with the 1202 
Commission with the aim of coordinating studies and putting togeth 
er available funds to finance these studies. The joint study wil! 
center on overall planning, with a major emphasis on the financing 
of public higher education. Under this rubric, said Trustee Troy 
the study would concern tuition, tuition waivers, financial aid, 
student information about available financial support, the impact 
of state aid to public colleges, the impact of increased tuition 
on the financing of public education, etc. 

It had also been agreed that the planning group should 
concern itself not just with overall financial policy, but with 
academic matters as well, beginning with an update of the program 
and course inventory for the whole of the Commonwealth, together 
with analytical comment and evaluations. This completed Trustee 
Troy's report. 



The Chairman recognized Trustee Spiller, who spoke brief 
ly on the subject of communication. Much of the comment he had 
heard on this subject at the beginning of the meeting, he said, 



Board 
5/5/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Management and 
Maintenance 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-048A) 



) 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher Educa- 
tion 



4104 



Board 
5/5/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had suggested that the responsibility for communication lay chief-- 
ly with the administration and the Trustees. Yet he felt that the 
faculty and student leaders also had a responsibility to report 
fairly to their constituents on the true nature and details of 
Trustee deliberations. This, he maintained, they had failed to 
do. The Trustees do have a system for access to the Board, he 
continued, but to establish a policy of direct access would destroy 
the governance system and the authority of the President and the 
Chancellors. It was not the responsibility of the Trustees, he 
emphasized, to administer the University directly. 

Chairman Healey closed the open session by saying that 
the Trustees were grateful to Trustee Rothenburger for the charac- 
ter of his service as Student Trustee from UM/Boston. He had been 
a vigorous advocate of the student interest, he said, and was a 
credit to the students who had elected him. 

A motion was made and seconded, and at 3:30 p.m. it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session for the purpose of discussing 
honorary degrees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 



I 



ftlladyl Keith Hardy ' 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



I 



ATTENDANCE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 2, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
Twenty-first Floor Conference Room 
One Ashburton Place 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Abrams , Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Croce, 
Cronin, Eddy, McNeil, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, Spillerj, 
Troy, Winthrop , Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding, Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, Ms. Kaplan representing Trus- 
tee Okin, Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Treasurer 
Johnson; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Mr. 
Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Dennis, Gordon, Morgenthau 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management 



and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, Exec- 
utive Assistant to the President; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice Presi- 
dent for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. 
O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant to the Pres- 
ident 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gage, Vice Chancelloi 
for Student Affairs; Professor Short, Alternate Faculty Represent- 
ative; Mr. Beatty, Budget Office; Mr. Woodbury, Associate Provost; 
Mr. Federow, Graduate Student Representative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 



dent Affairs; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative; Mr. 
Larner, Director of Public Relations 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr, 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, 
ative 



Smith, Associate Dean for 

Faculty Represent- 



Guests : Susan Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. The first 
item was the presentation of the minutes of the previous meeting. 
There were no corrections or amendments, and it was therefore 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of May 5, 
1976. 

Chairman Healey next recognized the President for his 
report. President Wood first reported on the three commencements 
The weather had been good at all three campuses, he said, for the 



4105 



Approval of 
Minutes 



Report of 
President 



4106 



Board 
6/2/76 

Commencement 



Summer Jobs 



University 
Budget Request 



Kennedy 
Library 



Reorganization 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

first time that he could remember. He said, finally, that the 
commencement address by Carl T. Rowan at Amherst had been excel- 
lent, that the speeches by the three Chancellors had been respect4 
able, and that the speeches by the President had been "ordinary 
and occasionally repetitive." President Wood then said that the 
campuses' invitations to Trustees to attend the commencements were 
serious, and he hoped that more Trustees would attend next year. 



The President then reported that discussions were under 
way with Senators Owens and Kelly about the ways in which the 
University can assist in the summer jobs program which the Senators 
the Lieutenant Governor and the Mayor of Boston have been concerned 
with. He said he would make a report to the Board sometime in 
August . 

President Wood then reported on the University Budget 
request. The current House Budget figure was $107 million, $8 
million more than FY 1976. While the Amherst campus might have 
wished for more, it was an improvement over last year. The Pres- 
ident's Office, he said, was hit the hardest. 

The President next informed the Board that he testified 
that morning on a bill which would carry out the transfer of land 
on the Harbor Campus to the federal government for the John F. 
Kennedy Library. The bill had been reported out favorably by the 
Committee and would be on the House floor this afternoon. 



Finally, the President said that he had been participat- 
ing with Trustee Breyer in meetings with the segmental representa- 
tives on reorganization of public higher education. In these dis- 
cussions, he said, he and Trustee Breyer would be guided by the 
Statement of Principles agreed upon by the Board. This completed 
the President's report, and he called on Chancellor Bromery of the 
Amherst campus for his report. 



Chancellor Bromery reported first on some statistics. 
The commencement had been attended by more students than ever be- 
fore, he said; in addition to some 4,000 graduates, there were 
15,000 or so parents and friends. Mr. Rowan had received a five- 
minute standing ovation, which the Chancellor said he had not seen 
before. The Amherst campus had enrolled its freshman class of 
3,600, he said, and he added that the applications for the profes- 
sional schools, particularly the School of Education and the School 
of Engineering, were far greater than the number of available 
spaces. This was why an adequate budget was so desperately needec 
so that the campus could maintain its level of high quality educa- 
tion. This concluded his report. 

Chancellor Golino of the Boston campus then spoke, re- 
porting to the Board that the progress of the reunification of the 
College of Liberal Arts was proceeding more smoothly and with more 
good will than even he had expected. All of the eleven split de- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

partments had been reunified, he said, which he said was an indi- 
cation of a spirit of cooperation. In fact, the faculty were 
showing a desire to move faster in the process of reunification 
than was thought possible. 

Chancellor Golino next reported on commencement , saying 
that more than 1,000 students had received degrees this year, the 
largest class in UM/Boston history. He said that the commencement 
address had been given by a blind student with three children, anc 
he said her address had been inspiring. He also urged the Trus- 
tees to attend the commencement when possible, because it meant a 
great deal to the students and the parents. This completed Chan- 
cellor Golino' s report. President Wood then recognized Chancellor 
Bulger of the Worcester campus. 

Chancellor Bulger reported that this year's Medical 
School graduating class was twenty-six, the largest so far. He 
said he looked forward to forty graduates next year, sixty the 
year after that, and then the first full class of one hundred. 
He then gave some facts on the demographic distribution of the 
freshman class of 100, which included thirty-six women. He added 
that only a few of the parents of the incoming class were affili- 
ated at all with the health field. A majority of them were of the 
working class: policemen, janitors, electricians, etc. He said 
this was something which the University could be proud of. Chan- 
cellor Bulger also thanked those Trustees who had been able to 
attend the commencement, and he said the presence of Governor 
Dukakis had also been much appreciated. These remarks concluded 
his and the President's remarks. 

The next matter on the agenda was the report of the 
Executive Committee. The Chairman recognized Trustee Carlson who 
reported on a proposal for the Funding of the Group Practice at 
UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-098) . Trustee Carlson explained that sev- 
eral factors had brought about an anticipated shortfall in the 
Group Practice Trust Fund, which fund was needed to pay the Group 
Practice portion of the doctors' compensation. A source had been 
identified for meeting this shortfall, and the funds to be so 
transferred would be reimbursed as soon as possible. Motions were 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the purpose of the Reimbursable Grants Trust 

Fund Account 0-11020, a revolving trust fund account 
shall be for the financing of reimbursable grants 
and contracts and as a source of funds for reimburs- 
able payment or transfers to new trust funds and to 
University trust funded activities. 

VOTED : That the Chancellor of the Amherst Campus be and 

hereby is authorized to transfer funds from account 
0-11020 to account 3-7000 as required. Further that 
the reimbursement from account 3-7000 for said trans- 



4107 



Board 
6/2/76 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

UM/Worcester — 
Funding of 
Group Practice 
(Doc. T76-098) 



4108 



Board UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

6/2/76 

f erred funds be completed by no later than June 30, 
1978. 



Fund Transfers The next item was a set of Fund Transfers at UM/Worcester 

(Doc. T76-095) and the Office of the President (Doc. T76-095) . There was no ob- 
jection, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the fund transfers as set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-095. 



Continuing 
Resolution 



Academic Per - 
sonnel Policy 
(Doc. T76-081) 



The Committee had then recommended that the Board ap- 
prove a Continuing Resolution to allow the University to spend 
money in the interim between the end of the fiscal year and the 
enactment of the FY 1977 Budget. A motion was made, seconded, anc 
it was 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to approve and adopt 
the policies and procedures governing the expenditure 
of state and non-state funds by the three campuses, 
the Office of the President and the Institute for 
Governmental Services from July 1, 1976 until such 
time as the Board of Trustees adopts the Operating 
Budget for Fiscal Year 1977. 

The approval of expenditure of said funds shall be 
consistent with the applicable state statutes govern- 
ing the FY 77 appropriation and in accordance with 
trustee policy. 



Chairman Healey then introduced the Academic Personnel 
Policy (Doc. T76-081) , and asked Trustee Troy to report, since 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, which he chaired, 
had initially studied and recommended this policy. Trustee Troy 
reminded the Board that it had adopted Doc. T75-125, the current 
academic personnel policy, in June 1975 with the provision that it 
be reviewed before September 1976. This review had taken place on 
each campus, resulting in recommendations which had then been stud- 
ied by the Multicampus Academic Personnel Policy Committee. A 
resulting draft revision had been subjected to a second campus 
review, resulting in the final document presented to the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy (Doc. T76-081) . The new document 
represented primarily clarifications of language, particularly in 
the delineation of the respective responsibilities of faculty and 
administration in personnel decisions. In essence, it was made 
more explicit that the responsibility to initiate personnel rec- 
ommendations and to provide compelling evidence in support of a 
candidate rested with the faculty, and the responsibility to review 
that evidence and to base a decision upon it rested with the ad- 
ministration. Broadly speaking, said Trustee Troy, there had been 
few basic changes in Doc. T75-125. There had been enough modifi- 
cation and rearrangement of language, however, that it was felt 
advisable to submit a wholly new, revised document, Doc. T76-081 
rather than attempt to offer elaborate patching of the old for 



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4109 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Board to figure out. Of course, most of Doc. T76-081 was sim- 
ply carried over from Doc. T75-125. 

The Multicampus Committee had recommended that the per- 
sonal qualification requirements for tenure consist of excellence 
in one of the three tenure criteria (teaching, scholarship and 
service) and strength in the other two. Doc. T75-125 called for 
excellence in two and strength in the third. The F&EP Committee 
had discussed this, and finally declined to dilute the existing 
requirement. 

Questions had been raised, he reported, about the appli- 
cability of the criteria to the College of Public and Community 
Service, and the College of Professional Studies at UM/Boston, 
many of whose faculty are not academicians in the usual sense. It 
was pointed out that the policy allows the campuses to make flexi- 
ble applications of the criteria; for example, at the College of 
Public and Community Service the criterion of service would carry 
greater weight than in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Counsel had expressed continuing opposition to the words 
"rare and compelling" as applied to negative personnel decisions 
by the President. The Committee had felt, however, that the Trus 
tees should retain the words as meaning that serious consideratior 
must be given to faculty recommendation on tenure and personnel 
matters in a manner consistent with the Trustee policy on Univer- 
sity Governance (Doc. T73-098) . 

The Committee had agreed, finally, that the Academic 
Personnel Policy should be reviewed yet again in another year to 
determine its effectiveness, particularly in relation to the work 
of School and College Personnel Committees. Several Trustees had 
expressed concern about the slackness of departmental committees 
in rigorously applying the tenure criteria, and had suggested that 
greater emphasis ought to be given to the review of school and 
college personnel committees. This completed Trustee Troy's re- 
port on this item, and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept all of the revisions to the current Academic 
Personnel Policy (Doc. T75-125) as set forth in Trus- 
tee Document T76-081 except the proposed section 
4.9(a) and to substitute therefor the text of sectior 
4.10(a) of Trustee Document T75-125: 

"Convincing evidence of excellence in at least 
two, and strength in the third, of the areas of 
teaching; of research, creative or professional ac- 
tivity; and of service, such as to demonstrate the 
possession of qualities appropriate to a member of th*e 
faculty occupying a permanent position." 

VOTED ; To adopt the Academic Personnel Policy as set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-081, as amended; further, 



Board 
6/2/76 



4110 



Board 
6/2/76 



Executive 

Compensation 

Policy 

(Doc. T76-093) 



Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T76-099) 



Personnel 

Actions 

(Docs. T76-091, 

T76-092, T76- 

094, T76-097, 

T76-101) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that Docs. T63-050, T64-061 (except for Part II, 
Articles 5-7), T73-069, T75-125 and any other policy, 
rule or regulation incompatible with Doc. T76-081, as 
amended, be rescinded. 

Trustees Rowland, McNeil, Spiller and Winthrop voted 
against the last motion. Trustee Rowland explained that she be- 
lieved that the advice of counsel should be taken on the question 
of "rare and compelling." She said if you're going to have coun- 
sel, you ought to listen to him. Trustee Spiller agreed. Trustee 
Winthrop explained that if the Committee is to review the policy 
again in a year, that suggests that it has not fully come to a 
conclusion on it, or at least he had not, and he said he was also 
concerned that the whole policy of tenure for Extension Service 
people should be reviewed. Trustee McNeil explained that she voted 
against the policy because she was not sure that the policy clearly 
covered the professional colleges at UM/Boston. Speaking to this 
last point, Trustee Troy observed that the representatives of the 
professional colleges at the meeting had themselves been satisfied. 



Vice President Lynton explained that major portions of 
the policy were yet to be developed, covering such areas as griev- 
ance procedure, part-time faculty and special appointments includ- 
ing extension appointments. Amendments in these areas would be 
forthcoming. 

Chairman Healey next asked President Wood to discuss 
the Executive Compensation Policy (Doc. T76-093) , which the Pres- 
ident described as the "Deans' Relief Bill of 1976." The policy 
extended salary lines for senior executive positions to three 
additional positions, made deans' salary ranges minimally compe- 
titive with other Universities nationally, and made adjustments in 
overscale salaries in the President's Office. The President of- 
fered a Classification of Position Titles (Doc. T76-099) and sev- 
eral Personnel Actions , two of which carried out the appointments 
of Robert J. Steamer as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at 
UM/Boston and of Dr. Richard J. Hunter as Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UM/Worcester . Upon motions 
made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the President of the University to take 
the necessary steps to extend the application of the 
salary policy lines for senior executive positions 
as adopted on June 4, 1975, to the positions of Sec- 
retary of the University and the General Counsel of 
the University, and to establish new salary ranges 
for those positions. 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position Titles as 
set forth in Doc. T76-099. 



VOTED 



The Classification of Position Titles under the 



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4111 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 shall 
be fixed in a weekly salary range from a minimum to 
a maximum or fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be designated by any job group number 
or grade. 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 648 of 
the Acts of 1962, the position title in the Profes- 
sional Staff in Doc. T76-099 is classified at a week- 
ly salary rate specified after the title of position 
in the schedule subject to subsequently being amended, 
revised, added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
under the provisions of said Chapter 648. 

VOTED : To concur with the appointment of Dr. Robert J. 

Steamer as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-091. 



VOTED : To approve the personnel action, UM/Boston, as set 
forth in Document T76-094. 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Action, UM/ 
Worcester, as detailed in Doc. T76-092. 

VOTED : To approve the personnel actions, Office of the Pres- 
ident, as set forth in Doc. T76-097 and Doc. T76-101. 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject to the 

policies and procedures now in effect as subsequently 
amended, revised, added to, or repealed by the Board 
of Trustees with respect to professional personnel 
under provisions of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as 
amended by Chapter 648, 1962. The classification, 
salary range, and descriptive job specification for 
each position to which a member of the professional 
staff is hereby appointed, promoted, transferred, or 
determined shall be as hereafter determined by the 
Board of Trustees or under their authority. 

The next item recommended by the Executive Committee 
was a set of Amendments to the Medical Center By-Laws (Docs. T76- 
034A, T76-100) . The amendments were required to carry out certain 
certifications required for reimbursement by the federal govern- 
ment under Medicare and Medicaid. A motion was made and seconded 
and it was 

VOTED : That the By-Laws of the University of Massachusetts 

Medical Center (Doc. T76-034A) be amended by adopting 
the proposed amendments set forth in Doc. T76-100. 

Chairman Healey then asked Trustee Troy to report for 



Board 
6/2/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Medical Center 
By-Laws 
(Docs. T76- 
034A, T76-100) 



4112 



Board 
6/2/76 

Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 

UM/Amherst, 
Boston and 
Worcester — 
Tenure Awards 
(Doc. T76-080B) 



UM/Amherst — 
University 
Without Walls 
(Doc. T76-077) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. That Committee's 
first item had been consideration of Tenure Awards for UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston, and UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-080B) . The President had 
said that this year's group of candidates had been subjected to 
the most systematic and rigorous review since the Governance State 
ment had been adopted. The greatest weakness, however, consisted 
in the continuing failure of some departments to conduct their 
reviews in the context of long-range department and college plans. 
The failure to do this, he had said, could eventually result in 
exigencies of budget becoming a final tenure criterion. 

After the President and Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs had completed their remarks, the Committee had focused on 
some of the questions with which it must be concerned each year: 
the degree of rigor with which the faculty levels assess candi- 
dates for tenure and form their recommendations, the progress of 
the University toward an undesirably high degree of tenured fac- 
ulty, and the impact of high tenure percentages on the possibility 
of recruiting young and brilliant faculty. 



It had been said that the departmental level at UM/ 
Boston and the decanal level, at least in some cases, at UM/ 
Amherst had not exercised the requisite care and judgement in 
scrutinizing those faculty members due for a tenure decision. 
And the Committee had discussed and once again put to rest the 
idea of a tenure quota, preferring instead what it regarded as th€: 
wiser policy of providing for as much flexibility and openness in 
departments as was consistent with holding on to the best faculty 
The Committee had generally felt, said Trustee Troy, that with 
greater sensitivity, intelligent concern and courage at the depart- 
mental level of review, many of the problems associated with tenure 



review would vanish. Trustee Troy then offered two motions 
were seconded, and it was 



which 



VOTED: 



To concur in the President's award of tenure to 
those faculty members named in Doc. T76-080B at 



the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
and Worcester. 



Boston 



VOTED : To concur with the President's appointments with 

tenure of the persons named in Doc. T76-079 at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester. 

After dealing with the Academic Personnel Policy (upon 
which he had reported earlier in this meeting) , the Committee had 
heard a proposal for the establishment of the University Without 
Walls at the Amherst campus (Doc. T76-077) . This program had been 
operating for several years on a trial basis, and the Trustees 
were asked at this time to eliminate its probationary status. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To establish the University Without Walls at the 



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■^jL-Lvj 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University of Massachusetts at Amherst as described 
in Doc. T76-077. 

Finally, Trustee Troy presented the Graduation Lists for 
UM/Boston and Worcester (Docs. T76-089, T76-090) . Chairman Healey 
asked what would happen if these lists were not voted, since com- 
mencement was now past. Trustee Troy surmised that the result 
would be awkward. Nevertheless it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the May, 1976 Graduation List of the 

University of Massachusetts at Boston, subject to 
the completion of all requirements as certified by 
the Recorder of that campus, as contained in Doc. 
T76-089. 

VOTED : To approve the May, 1976 Graduation List of the 

University of Massachusetts at Worcester, subject 
to the completion of all requirements as certified 
by the Recorder of that campus, as contained in 
Doc. T76-090. 

This completed Trustee Troy's report, and the Chairman 
asked Trustee Rowland to commence her report on the meeting of 
the Committee on Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland said the 
Committee had met on May 19, and had first heard a report from 
Professor James Ackerman on the work of the Trustee Advisory Coun- 
cil on the Fine Arts. The Committee was to deal with the final 
report of the Council at its August meeting, she said, and might 
well end up recommending a policy statement on long-range planning 
for the Fine Arts. Among the Council's concerns and recommenda- 
tions were: 

1. Increasing faculty and budget support for the fine 
arts at UM/Boston. 

2. Enhancing the possibility of the development of a 
genuine Fine Arts Center for UM/Amherst. 

3. Limiting the number of majors in specialized degree 
programs in order to assure quality and to make general arts 
courses more accessible to non-art majors. 

4. Increasing scholarship support for students in the 
Arts at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. 

The Long-Range Planning Committee had then discussed 
continuing education. The conclusions of both a special Amherst 
campus Ad Hoc Committee on the Division of Continuing Education, 
and a Continuing Education Subcommittee of the Multicampus Plan- 
ning Committee appear, said Trustee Rowland, to be in the direc- 
tion of viewing continuing education as an extension of the regu- 
lar campus academic programs . 



Board 
6/2/76 



Graduation 

Lists 

(Docs. T76-089 

T76-090) 



Committee on 

Long-Range 

Planning 

Advisory Coun- 
cil on the Fine 
Arts 



Continuing 
Education 



4114 



Board 
6/2/76 



Committee on 
Student Affairs 

UM/ Amherst and 
Boston — 
Revenue- Sup- 
ported Programs 
(Docs. T76-056, 
T76-086) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Student Affairs 
Trust Fund 



UM/Amherst — 
Student Legal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The discussion of the Committee had made clear, she con- 
tinued, that there was a close and constructive link between its 
current review of the University's field and research stations 
and the review of continuing education programs at both campuses. 
It was also clear, she said, that both fine arts programs and non- 
traditional educational programs will have to confront the diffi- 
cult problem of priorities. In considering these matters, the 
Committee will work closely with the Budget and Finance Committee 
whose Chairman, Mr. Carlson, is a member of both Committees. 

The Chairman thanked Trustee Rowland, and called on 
Trustee Shaler to report for the Committee on Student Affairs. 
That Committee, said Trustee Shaler, had first discussed Revenue- 
Supported programs at both UM/Amherst and Boston. First Amherst: 
That campus had recommended a $45 rent increase for the residence 
halls. Trustee Shaler explained that the rents paid, not only 
for normal maintenance, but also for debt service. After the 
buildings were paid off they would become the property of the Com- 
monwealth, which he described as a lucrative operation for the 
State. The Committee had discussed ways of supporting the resi- 
dence halls by means other than periodic rent increases, such as 
by a general fee paid by all students or by a capital outlay ap- 
propriation. The Committee had asked, after further discussion, 
that the Chancellor present at an early meeting of the Committee 
a long-range plan for rectifying this problem. 

Next the Committee had discussed the Student Activities 
Trust Fund. This trust fund is funded and disbursed under Trus- 
tee auspices, and the question was raised about whether the fund 
was being managed according to University accounting and auditing 
practices and standards. 



The Committee then discussed the proposed authorization 
of the Student Legal Services Office at UM/Amherst to represent 
Services Office students in criminal cases and in litigation against the Univer- 
sity. This authorization had been extended through FY 1976, and 
the Board had required in its initial vote that the activities of 
the Office be reviewed before the mandate would be renewed. The 
Committee had been satisfied, said Trustee Shaler, that the activ 
ities of the Office had been proper. Upon motion made and second 
ed , it was 

VOTED : That the attorneys employed by the Student Legal 

Services Office be authorized to represent students 
in criminal matters and to engage in litigation 
against the University on their behalf. 

Trustee Shaler then reported that the Committee had 
heard an explanation of revenue-supported programs at UM/Boston. 
Chancellor Golino had said that all of the funds in the Student 
Affairs Committee Trust Fund were being expended within established 
University accounting and auditing procedures. There had been no 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion of this matter. 

The Committee had next considered a proposal to renew 
for another year the Residence Hall, Dining Commons Policy for 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-078) . Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To extend for one year, beginning September 1, 1976, 
the provisions of the vote of June 4, 1975 with re- 
spect to on-campus residency of undergraduate students 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

VOTED : To extend for one year, beginning September 1, 1976, 
the provisions of the vote of June 4, 1975 with re- 
spect to use of dining commons by undergraduate stu- 
dents at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

The final item before the Committee had been a report 
on the Division of Student Affairs at UM/Boston. The Chairman 
had felt that this report had focused too much on mere mechanics 
without specifying the campus's goals, commitments and priorities 
in the student affairs area. The Committee had asked that a re- 
vised report, containing these details, be filed at its next meet 
ing. This completed Trustee Shaler's report. 

The Chairman next asked for the report of the Committee 
on Budget and Finance, presented by Trustee Carlson. Trustee 
Carlson first asked the Board's concurrence with the proposal to 
establish the H.T.U. Smith Memorial Geology Fund at UM/Amherst. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To accept the H.T.U. Smith Memorial Geology Award, 

in the amount of $3,352.50, as an Endowment Fund for 
the purpose of making one or more awards annually 
from income earned during the preceding fiscal year 
to undergraduate and graduate students (including 
freshmen and graduating seniors) regularly enrolled 
at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus. 
Awards shall be for tuition, fees, research and to 
defray expenses in connection with geological field 
work. Selection of recipients shall be made by a 
faculty committee appointed by the Chairperson of the 
Geology/Geography Department; said committee shall 
determine the number and amount of awards which shal] 
be made to students majoring in Geology on the basis 
of scholastic achievement and merit of research proj- 
ect. Income may be carried forward from year to 
year or returned to principal at the direction of 
the committee. 

The second item on the Committee's agenda had been a 
Status Report by Vice President Janis on Grant and Contract admins 
istration throughout the University. Mr. Janis had discussed the 



4115 



Board 
6/2/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Residence Halls ; 
Dining Commons 
(Doc. T76-078) 



UM/Boston — 
Report of Divi- 
sion of Student 
Affairs 



Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

UM/Amherst — 
H.T.U. Smith 
Memorial Fund 



Grants and 
Contracts Ad- 
ministration 



4116 



Board 
6/2/76 

Coopers & 
Lybrand, Hay 
Associates 



UM/ Amherst — 
School of 
Education 



UM/ Amherst — 
Campus Center 
and Continuing 
Education 



UM/Amherst — 
Fee Changes 
(Doc. T76-085) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommendations of Coopers & Lybrand on all campuses. He had also 
reviewed the organizational relationships of the administration 
and business aspects of the central office and the campuses, and 
had made clear that the consultants' reports, including that of 
Hay Associates, had dealt with administrative and management func- 
tions only, and not with academic affairs. He had also noted the 
Hay report's emphasis on the undesirability of separating policy 
development from policy implementation, since communication must 
flow both ways on this continuum. In response to a question, saic 
Trustee Carlson, Mr. Janis had said that only a few additional 
staff positions would be needed to carry out the organizational 
management functions he had described. 

The Budget and Finance Committee then heard a report 
from Mr. Janis on the HEW audit of the School of Education at UM/ 
j Amherst . Mr. Janis had discussed the HEW audit at length, but the 
i common thread of his remarks, said Trustee Carlson, was that (1) 
! the business subsystems of the University must be strengthened, 

(2) controls must be extended, and (3) increased policy direction 
! in business matters must be provided from the President's office. 



The Committee next recommended that the Board authorize 
an annual outside audit of the Campus Center and Division of Con- 
tinuing Education, in view of the large sums of money involved in 
these operations. In response to a question, Chancellor Bromery 
said that these operations represent a magnitude of $8 million. 
Trustee Spiller asked what the fee for the audit would be, and it 
was explained that the fee for the first year would be larger than 
subsequent years, because an initial audit is always more expensive 
than an ongoing audit. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the President to take the necessary 
steps to engage Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co . , to 
perform an annual audit of the Campus Center and 
the Division of Continuing Education, such contract 
not to exceed $25,000 plus expenses. 

Trustee Carlson then reported that the Committee had 
taken up several proposed fee changes at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76- 
085) . The Committee had elected not to repeat the discussion of 
residence hall increases which had taken place the day before at 
the Committee on Student Affairs' meeting. Nor had it rediscussec 

I the mandate of the Legal Services Office. The Committee had acted 
then on three Amherst fees which had been postponed at the April 
meeting for further review. The first was for the establishment 
of a trust fund to cover the cost of the New York Outreach Program 
at UM/Amherst, the second was an increase in the late registration 
fee, and the third was the establishment of a fund and a charge 
schedule for research services provided by the University. The 
Committee had then acted on the proposed room rent increase. Chan 

j cellor Bromery had explained that the $45, in addition to the a- 
mount in the operating budget, was the amount necessary to meet 



■ 



■ 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the minimum necessary renovations in the residence halls. The 
increase would also replace the $364,000 transferred from the 
Residence Hall Trust Fund for the purchase of Project #14. Upon 
motions made and seconded it was 



1 



J 



VOTED 



VOTED 



VOTED : 



VOTED : 



VOTED 



VOTED : 



VOTED 



That, effective July 1, 1976, the New York Outreach 
Trust Fund be and hereby is established. 

That, effective July 1, 1976, the fee of $350 ($273 
for rent and $77 for program costs) for the New York 
Outreach Trust Fund be and hereby is established. 

That effective July 1, 1976 the Research Council 
Services Fund be and hereby is established. The 
purpose of the Trust Fund will be to support the 
glass, chemical, electronic and other research serv- 
ices available to faculty and students engaged in 
sponsored and unsponsored research and to act as the 
depository for revenue generated from such services. 

That effective July 1, 1976, the fee schedule as 
detailed on page III. 71 of Section III of Doc. T76- 
056 be and hereby is established for the Research 
Council Services Fund. 

That effective July 1, 1976, charge for Late Regis- 
tration and/or Payment is established at $25 per 
student, said fees shall be remitted to the Common- 
wealth. The Chancellor or his designee is authorizec. 
to waive this fee in individual cases of unusual or 
extenuating circumstances. 



That, if adopted by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority, the following per occupant charges 
reflecting a $45 increase in all projects be approvec, 
effective September 1, 1976: 



4117 



Board 
6/2/76 



Project 

Project I 
Projects II, 
Project XII 



IV, VI, VIII, X 



Annual 
Charge 

$690.00 
750.00 
770.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$345.00 
375.00 
385.00 



That effective September 1, 1976, the following 
charges be established for student accommodations 
in dormitories in the Residence Hall Trust Fund: 



Condition 

Renovated 
Unrenovated 



Annual 
Charge 

$750.00 
690.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$375.00 
345.00 



4il8 



Board 
6/2/76 



UM/Amherst , 
Boston and 
Worcester — 
Fee-Based 
Budget (Docs. 
T76-056, T76- 
086, T76-087) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Cronin and Conti voted against the late regis- 
tration fee increase and room rent increase. 

The Committee then acted upon the Fee-Based Budget of 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-056) , UM/Boston (Doc. T76-086) and UM/Wor- 
cester (Doc. T76-087) . Upon motions made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 

Revenue-based Budget, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst Campus, dated June 1976 (Doc. T76-056) . 

VOTED : To approve the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 

Fee-based Budget, UM/Boston, dated May 1976 (Doc. 
T76-086). 

VOTED : To approve the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 

Fee-based Budget, UM/Worcester , dated May 1976 (Doc. 
T76-087). 

In response to a question from Secretary Parks, Chancel-' 
lor Bromery said that the increase in fees amounted to about $70- 
75 annually. This was the first increase the campus had had in 
two years. 

Trustee Spiller raised the subject of Married Students 
Housing, saying that a great amount of work and staff time had 
been expended by the student Legal Services Office in developing 
the proposal for a cooperative. But he noted that when the pro- 
posal was finally submitted to the residents of Married Students 
Housing themselves, they turned it down. He asked how much per 
student in mandatory fees is paid for the support of student activ- 
ities. He said that there appeared to be many services and activ- 
ities supported by the Student Activities fee which are not used 
by many students. The married students housing cooperative, he 
Isaid, was an example of an activity which did not have majority 
support of the affected students. He believed that many activities 
had been built into the fee over a period of time and might be 
hurting students financially. 

Trustee Cronin said that while Trustee Spiller was speak- 
ing of the Student Activities Tax, he wished to point out that 
there were other mandatory fees levied by the University, such as 
the athletic activities fee, which are paid by all students, in- 
cluding those who do not participate in athletics. All under- 
graduate students are members of student government, he said, and 
it is up to the students to participate in the activities which 
it governs. 

Chancellor Bromery observed that the Married Students 
Housing residents are primarily graduate students, and graduate 
students do not pay the student activities. Trustee Breyer said 
that a great deal of time had been spent on the Married Students 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposal on the assumption that it was what most of the students 
wanted. When it turned out that a majority of the students did 
not want it, it was natural to question the fairness of having al 
students contribute to it. This discussion was completed, and 
Chairman Healey asked for the report of the Committee on Health 
Affairs. 



Trustee Robertson reported that the Committee had heard 
first some remarks from Chancellor Bulger on several topics, in- 
cluding accreditation, open heart surgery, and others. The Com- 
mittee had then heard an update on the progress of the Medical 
School toward establishing a Poison Control Center. Next, the 
Committee received a report on affirmative action at the Hospital! 
and Medical School. Chairman Robertson said he had been disap- 
pointed that the document could not have been sent prior to the 
meeting. Beyond this, however, the figures were low, and the 
Medical Center had been asked to present an implementation plan 
along with goals to the Committee at its September meeting. 

The Committee then had discussed several nominations 
for the Hospital Management Board, all of which were found to be 
highly qualified. The Committee had taken the position that any 
person asked to serve on this Board would be expected to serve 
actively on a regular basis. Mr. Robertson said he believed that 
Chairman Healey' s recommended appointments would go to the Board 
in August and the Committee would be ready to meet after that. 

A brief discussion took place about the current census 
of the hospital and about the possible and expected revenue of 
the hospital. Dr. Bulger said that the hospital census was right 
on target as of the present. 

Trustee Abrams reported that the Committee had also 
heard a statement from Dr. Milford Greene, Assistant Dean of Stu- 
dents, that he had submitted a proposal to HEW for early identi- 
fication of minority high school students who might be interested 
in Medical School. Trustee Abrams said he was encouraged by this 
effort to implement a Trustee policy. Trustee Troy said he also 
was concerned at the lack of implementation of programs of this 
sort, and said there had been a committee at Amherst at one time 
charged with identifying minority high school students. He said 
he wished that there might be a formal report on this subject 
made to the Trustees. Trustee Robertson said he believed this 
would be covered by the report to be made to his Committee in 
September. 

Chairman Healey next asked Trustee Troy to report in 
his capacity as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trus- 
tee Troy reported that the BHE had been engaged recently in stud- 
ying the various reorganization plans for higher education. It 
had also voted to amend its own bill for reorganization, includin 
within it the proposal that Senator Harrington appoint a blue- 



4119 



Board 
6/2/76 



Committee on 
Health Affairs 

Accreditation, 
Open Heart Sur- 
gery, Poison 
Control, Affirm- 
ative Action 



UM/Worcester — 
Hospital Manage- 
ment Board 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of Higher 
Education 



4120 



Board 
6/2/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ribbon commission to study reorganization and to report its rec- 
ommendations to the Governor in six months. This completed Trus- 
tee Troy's report. 

Chairman Healey reminded the Board that the chief exec- 
utives and the segmental Board Chairmen had been meeting to re- 
draft S. 1371 to reflect some of the views of the segments. This 
process was continuing, and he therefore wished to adjourn the 
meeting, subject to the recall of the chair as provided in the By- 
Laws. Trustee Morgenthau who was unable to attend the meeting 
had provided the following statement on reorganization: "Our 
Board should urgently request more time. The present schedule for 
reorganization (S. 1371) does not allow those who are most con- 
cerned, and in particular the U/Massachusetts Board of Trustees, 
to read the amended bill and express an informed opinion. I be- 
lieve our Board must ask the Senate Education Committee to slow 
down its schedule. The much amended bill is so very different 
from the original — we must know what it is. My second concern is 
for solid information from educators experienced in different sys- 
tems of public higher education. I particularly have in mind New 
York, California, Wisconsin and Michigan. I would like an oppor- 
tunity, also, to see the recent Carnegie Report (Kerr Report) and 
to examine its recommendation on the merits and weaknesses of a 
coordinating board, as opposed to an operating superboard." 

Trustee Burack was recognized, and she requested that 
minutes be prepared of the May 24 informal meeting of the Board. 
President Wood moved that the meeting be adjourned at the call 
of the chair. The Chairman agreed to the request for minutes, and 
asked for discussion of the President's motion. There was none, 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned subject to the recall of 
the chair at 3:15 p.m. 



dbladv^ Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



■ 



1 



I 



ATTENDANCE : 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF THE RECONVENED MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 14, 1976; 9:30 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Clark, Croce, Cronin, Dennis, Morgenthau, 
Robertson, Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mrs. Bluestone representing 
Trustee Fielding; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mr. 
Colby representing Trustee Winthrop and Mrs. Kaplan representing 
Trustee Okin; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, 
Assistant Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Trustees Absent : Trustees Abrams, Carlson, Conti, Eddy, Gordon, 
Rowland, McNeil, Shaler and Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Mr. Cooley, 
Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Eller, 
Associate Vice President for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, 
Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Lewis, Staff 
Assistant for Budget; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 



UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Ms. Tillona, Specia 
Assistant to the Chancellor; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative; 
Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and Control 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger 

Guests: Mr. Richard Ames, Assistant Secretary for Educational 
Affairs 



The meeting was reconvened at 9:45 a.m. Chairman Healey 
reminded the Board that this meeting had been recalled by the 
Chair at the June 2 Board of Trustees meeting for the purpose 
of discussing reorganization. He began, however, by reading a 
letter from former Trustee Weldon, thanking the Board for the 
honorary degree conferred upon him by the University at the 
recent Commencement . 

Turning then to reorganization, the Chairman briefly 
sketched the history of his, Trustee Breyer 's and President 
Wood's participation in Senate President Harrington's "Working 



4121 



Letter from 
former Trustee 
Weldon 



Reorganization 
of Public 
Higher 
Education 



4122 



Board 
6/14/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Group," which had been composed of Chairmen and Chief Executives 
of the segments of public higher education. The object of the 
Group had been to suggest amendments in the Senate President's 
bill, which the segmental Boards might then review and take a 
position on, he said. 

There had been no resolution at these working sessions of 
such substantive issues as what would be the size of the pro- 
posed central Board, and of who would have the initial and 
ultimate appointing authority, both for this Board and for the 
segmental Boards. The Chairman suggested that the Trustees take 
this opportunity to focus on these issues, specifically on the 
relationship of the segmental Boards to the central Board. He 
then recognized the President. 

President Wood reported that the State College Board had 
met and authorized Trustee members of the Working Group and 
Chancellor Hammond to speak for it in further negotiations on 
S. 1371. The Community College Board had met and had authorized | 
its Executive Committee to speak for it, the SMU Board would meet| 
on June 15 and the Lowell Board was scheduled to meet on June 16.! 
The Working Group was to meet again on Thursday, June 17 at the 
request of Chairman Hamilton of the Community Colleges and meet- 
ings with the Senate President and the Governor were also plan- 
ned for the end of the week. 

Before expressing his views on the draft amendments for 
reorganization, the President said he wished to reiterate the 
original arrangements that govern the relationship between the 
Office of the President and the Board of Trustees. He noted 
at the outset that only seven of the twenty-six Trustees who had 
voted to appoint him in 1970 were now on the Board. 

He next sketched the various roles of the Board and its 
officers. The Secretary serves as a switching station between 
the Chairman, the President and the collective Board for provid- 
ing the intelligence necessary to operations. 



The President has a double role. As a Trustee, he partici 
pates in the work of the Board, which is subject to the Chair- 
man's direction in procedure. As chief academic and executive 
officer, he is responsible to the collective body, not to indi- 
vidual Trustees, and in this latter role must keep the Board in- 
formed on University operations and on such issues as administra- 
tion, program development, finances and governance. He must 
provide the Board with the data it needs to carry out its con- 
siderable responsibilities. 

The President pointed out that he had inherited from his 
predecessor the pattern for carrying out these responsibilities, 
and this had included formal and informal sessions of the Board. 
He mentioned several of these, and said that informal sessions 



' 



' 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



in their proper place have always made sense to him. At the 
informal sessions, wide-ranging discussions had resulted in 
consensus about such major decisions as enrollment levels, new 
programs and new colleges subsequently committed to paper and 
adopted formally. This pattern, effectively reflecting a well- 
constructed deliberation process as well as open, responsible 
public action, was in keeping with the American Constitutional 
Convention of 1787, in which closed sessions had yielded con- 
clusions of value. He gave two illustrations of this practice 
of informal deliberation and formal action; on the issues of 
coeducational dormitories and the impact on the community of the 
move of the University to its new quarters at Columbia Point. 

The President said, speaking as a Trustee, that he would 
strongly favor continuation of the practice of informal meetings 
with the clear understanding that they cannot be a substitute 
for formal meetings. But he did not believe that every discus- 
sion among Trustees need take place in public circumstances. 
Speaking as President, he said that a continuing practice of 
preparing and distributing full minutes of such sessions erases 
any distinction between formal and informal sessions. Therefore, 
he said, it was his understanding that the Board would hence- 
forth meet only in formal session. 

The President then turned to the subject of reorganization. 
He had already stated his conviction, he said, that reorganiza- 
tion was necessary. The question, he said, was how strong, how 
systemic and how internally consistent the new structure should 
be. 

Two key factors behind the need were the limits of growth 
and dwindling resources available to the public sector, the need 
to establish priorities among institutions and the need to 
eliminate redundant programs. Ordinarily, he said, these pres- 
sures would indicate the need for a more structured organization 
and less localized decision making. On the other hand, he 
noted that contemporary organizational philosophy leans toward 
decentralization, participatory decision making, consultation 
and consensus. 

Speaking then directly to S. 1371, the President said 
that Trustee Breyer's June 4 memorandum aptly caught the ten- 
sion between the "centralist" model and the "segmentalist" model. 
His analysis had also showed the movement in the Working Group 
away from the "centralist" model and toward the "segmentalist" 
model. The President said the June 3 draft was a consensual 
draft which reflected competing forces, and should not be viewed 
in terms of symmetry and logic as much as in terms of a compro- 
mise effort. 



4123 



Board 
6/14/76 



4124 



Board 
6/14/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The questions in his mind were: (1) is the draft workable?- 
and (2) will it hurt the University? As for the first question, 
the President said that the present draft can work and would be 
a substantial improvement over the existing situation. He said 
the principal instrument by which the Board of Governors would 
assure consistent institutional performance is the authority to 
prepare the budget. The master plan provisions will have to 
rely on their professional excellence and consensual appeal for 
adoption and implementation. But that is probably in the 
nature of things. The President said there is some rule-making 
authority, although it's not clear if the provision is sufficient 
to establish general standards in personnel and material policy. 
Information gathering and post-audit are in place, he said, but 
clearly operational authority — the power to hire and fire and 
to manage physical plant and facilities — would lie with the 
segmental Boards. The allocation of authority to the segmental 
Boards in certain areas, while the budget and planning authority 
are reserved to the central Board, he described as reasonable. 
He said also that an administrative reorganization, accompanying 
the law and becoming legislative history, is customary in federal 
legislation and would be essential in this case. He indicated 
he had begun discussions with counterpart segment heads. The 
proposed legislation would be evolutionary in nature, he said — 
the beginning, not the end. 

As for the question of the impact on the University, the 
President said it would depend in part on the role of the deputy 
chancellor of the University, whose duties he said might be com- 
bined with those of the chief executive of the largest campus. 
He said he believed the deputy chancellor would assume a 
University-wide role with respect to the Board of Trustees, 
ensuring that the University would fare well in the professional 
budget-making of the entire system. 



Although he was concerned about the possible loss of 
identity implicit in the devolution of responsibilities between 
the May 28 and June 3 versions, he believed the increased autho- 
rity of the segmental Boards enhances the capacity of the 
University to protect its high standards. 

Speaking then to membership, the President said the size 
of the Board did not bother him, since it would be only two 
members larger than the present University Board. What did con- 
cern him, he said, was that the other segmental Boards, smaller 
than ours, would be substantially stripped of their current 
members. It might be wise to consider a smaller central Board 
so that a stable transition throughout the system could be 
assured. 

President Wood said the June 3 draft did not suggest any 
model structure in terms of cost-effectiveness. But it was a 
step forward from the present disarray. Given good will and 



I 



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II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

adequate support, it could work in an evolutionary fashion to 
strengthen the working relationship between the segments which, 
in the past, had depended too much on personal attitudes, fortu- 
itous circumstances and good luck. The President then 

MOVED : That the Board authorize the Chairman to 

represent the Board of Trustees at the meet- 
ing of the Working Group scheduled for next 
Thursday, and to report at that time its 
position with respect to the reorganization 
proposed in the June 3 draft, consistent 
with the Statement of Principles of this 
Board. (See addendum.) 

Trustee Spiller seconded the motion. 

Trustee Troy said that as a Trustee of the University, he 
was primarily concerned with the protection of its three-campus 
integrity and of its excellence. He asked how the University 
could be protected under the present draft, and asked further 
what role the deputy chancellor would play in this effort? The 
Chairman picked up this question about the deputy chancellor, 
and said he believed that the reporting relationship between 
the deputy chancellor, the institutional presidents and the 
chancellor needed to be more clearly spelled out. 

President Wood said the deputy chancellor would report 
directly to the chancellor and would be a line officer, while 
the vice chancellors would be staff officers. The institutional 
presidents would report to the deputy chancellor, but would 
report ultimately to the segmental Board. There was considerable 
discussion of this question, and the Chairman and others did 
not appear to be satisfied as to its clarity. 

As for the maintenance of the quality of the University, 
President Wood said that the question was how to move education 
out of politics. A movement toward professional budgeting and 
planning, he said, would tend to move education away from poli- 
tics, and would therefore probably help the University. 

Trustee Breyer endeavored to represent Senate President 
Harrington's position as he had expressed it during a meeting 
with the Working Group. The Senate President had said that he 
believed public higher education must be reorganized. There 
would be less money available in coming years, and that would 
lead, under the present system, to segments fighting in the 
Legislature over the money available. He believed it would be 
better for a lay Board than for the Legislature to divide the 
available resources. 

The Senate President had also said that the bill was "his 



4125 



Board 
6/14/76 



4126 



Board 
6/14/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

bill", and that he wanted the help of the segments in writing 
it. He had pointed out that anybody can advise any government 
leader, and the members of the group need not hesitate to pro- 
vide advice to the Governor or anyone else who asks for it. 
Finally, Senator Harrington had said he believed reorganization 
had to happen soon, or else it would become entangled in guber- 
natorial politics and electoral politics generally. 

The Working Group of the Chairman and chief executives 
of public higher education had been asked to work in concert 
on the amendments which yielded, he said, the lowest common 
denominator; that is, a version of the bill which would be 
acceptable to all the segments. The principal issues facing 
the Group, said Trustee Breyer, had been: (1) was reorganization 
desirable? (2) could the bill, going through it bit by bit, be 
made acceptable to the segments? and (3) what was the proper 
timing? 

Trustee Morgenthau said she was pleased with the process as 
it had gone on, and that she agreed with the motion made by the 
President. However, she said she had concerns about the June 3 
draft, although she believed that it was an improvement over 
the previous draft. She was concerned, she said, about the 
haste of the process, but also about the ambiguity and overlap 
between the Boards as set forth in the bill. She was concerned 
that the high-quality campuses and institutions not be melted 
in with the lesser-quality campuses and institutions, and used 
as an analogy Chairman Mao's idea of a house held together with 
nails of different quality; no matter what their quality, she 
said, there was a tendency to hammer in any nails which stick 
out . 

She then expressed her concern that the bill would create 
many high-paying administrative jobs, and she was worried about 
the price tag. She said she wished there could be enough time 
to think things over and to study other reorganization plans, 
and she moved that the Board express support for the goal of 
reorganization, and that it request that the timetable be slowed 
down . 

Much discussion followed on the timing question. Trustee 
Breyer suggested that the timing was Senator Harrington's deci- 
sion, and not the Trustees'; certainly the Trustees should not 
expect to take so much time that there would be no reorganiza- 
tion at all. Trustee Dennis said he could not understand the 
haste, in view of the serious problems with reporting relation- 
ships still in the bill. Trustee Spiller said that the desire 
for reorganization originated in the political process, with the 
Senate President, and that the Senate President had made clear 
his intention to move within six weeks for the reasons which 
Trustee Breyer had mentioned. These were the parameters within 
which the Trustees would have to move if they wished to 



I 



I 



l 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



have an influence on the outcome. President Wood said that there 
was a difference between the way change comes about in academic 
institutions as against government institutions. In academic 
institutions, if a policy-making group is hesitant about a pro- 
posal, it defers it for more study. In government, if one 
hesitates about a decision, the decision gets made by somebody 
else. He cautioned against taking too much time. 

Trustee Burack disagreed strongly with Mr. Spiller's 
analysis. She said she was not constrained by the Senate Presi- 
dent's timetable, and said her responsibility was to stand for a 
bill which would be best educationally, regardless of the time- 
table. She also was concerned that the price tag was unknown, 
and said the bill contained "massive ambiguity." She favored 
greater coordination, but said she was not convinced that S. 1371 
was the right vehicle. 

Trustee Robertson said that money for higher education was 
getting more scarce, and that he did not want to see the fight 
carried to the Legislature every year. He said he was concerned 
with the appointment process for the central Board, and maintainec 
his opposition to any plan whereby one governor would appoint all 
the members. 



President Wood said he must emphasize the vulnerability of 
the present system of higher education. He described several 
examples of program duplications within the system, and said such 
duplications laid the system open to what he called the "Silber 
salvo." No reorganization saves money by itself, he said; the 
savings would come in the system's ability to eliminate redundanc 
in programs down the road. 

The President said he understood that it was popular to 
beat on administrators these days, but high-quality administrators 
were an expensive commodity. The elimination of professionalism 
in administration, he said, would not allow more graduate programs 
or more faculty positions. He said the system was paying a high 
price now for not having professionalism in place. 

Discussion returned to the position of deputy chancellor. 
Questions raised indicated confusion and uncertainty about the 
role and relationship of the deputy chancellor and Trustee Troy 
called it "a pig in a poke." Several other Trustees reiterated 
the Chairman's feeling that the reporting lines of deputy chan- 
cellors and vice chancellors should be clarified. 

Chancellor Bromery made the observation that the Amherst 
campus was not simply the largest campus in the system; it shoul 
be remembered, he said, that it was different in kind from the 
other campuses. There would surely be compromises, he continued, 
but one must remember that compromises do not always work. One 



4127 



Board 
6/14/76 



4128 



Board 
6/14/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the key questions to be resolved was whether SMU and Lowell 
were to be part of the system or not. The Trustees ought to 
take a position on something, because all of higher education 
would lose if the institutions continued to fight one another in 
the Legislature. 

Chancellor Golino said he also was concerned for the main- 
tenance of the integrity of the University. But he also said he 
would oppose second-class status for the Boston campus. He was 
as concerned as anyone about maintaining the high quality of the 
Amherst campus, but he hoped that the Boston campus would be 
given the chance to reach the same level of excellence. He said 
that, in his view, having the president of one of the campuses 
be deputy chancellor as well would set up a serious conflict of 
interest. 

The Trustees turned then to the question of powers reservec 
to the segmental Boards and the central Board. Several Trustees 
maintained that the central Board would have a no-appeal authority 
over the segmental Boards. Trustee Troy, in particular, said 
he believed that this would ultimately lead to mediocrity on the 
segmental Boards. Trustee Burack also expressed strong reserva- 
tions about this aspect of the bill. Trustee Breyer said that 
he had proposed the language in the amendment which stipulates 
that in the event a decision of a segmental Board conflicts with 
that of the Board of Governors, within the area of that Board's 
authority, the latter shall be controlling. He believed that 
if this was not clear, the courts would ultimately decide. 

Vice President Lynton said that historically, systems 
without reasonably strong central Boards tended to have a greater 
leveling among institutions. This Board of Trustees was con- 
cerned with the welfare of the University, he said, and rightly 
so, but he reminded it that any move to protect the position of 
the University would tend to protect also the prerogatives of 
the other segments. A central Board, he suggested, would be in 
a better position to say, for example, that the Amherst campus 
should remain the locus of graduate education in the system. 
Trustee Morgenthau disagreed with this analysis, and said that 
if the system Board is too powerful, it draws pressure from the 
Legislature. She cited the example of the pressure put on the 
unified oil companies by OPEC. There was further discussion on 
this point. 

Trustee Cronin said he was concerned, as a student Trustee 
that there appeared to be no place for students in the reorgani- 
zation plan. The present two student votes on the segmental 
Board would be reduced to one, under the present plan, and there 
would be no student representation on the central Board. Trustee 
Troy expressed his strong agreement with Trustee Cronin' s con- 
cern. Trustee Clark also agreed. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Several Trustees said they would have to leave soon to 
make other commitments, and it was suggested that the Trustees 
act on the President's motion. Trustee Morgenthau said that she 
had earlier offered a motion with respect to the need for adequate 
time for study, which should be voted on or incorporated in the 
President's motion. Trustee Breyer, seeking to clarify the intent 
of Trustee Morgenthau 's motion, asked if he was correct in infer- 
ring that she wished for study and refinement to continue as long 
as there was time, but that she did not wish to spend so much 
time in discussion that there would be no reorganization at all. 
Trustee Morgenthau said this was correct, and elaborated that she 
was mainly concerned that all of the concerns of the Trustees be 
expressed, that the Trustees have a chance to make their comments 
in writing, and that there continue to be a "back and forth" 
communication. An effort was made to combine the two motions, 
But Trustee Spiller asked for separate, roll-call votes on each. 
The President thereupon reworded his earlier motion, and Chair- 
man Healey put both the President's and Trustee Morgenthau ? s 
motions to collective voice votes. It was then 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman and Trustee Breyer 
to represent the Trustees at the meeting of 
the Working Group scheduled for next Thurs- 
day and there to indicate our readiness to 
continue the negotiations presently underway. 

There was a second to Trustee Morgenthau 's motion and it 
was 

VOTED : To respectfully urge that the desirable goal 
of reorganization in higher education be 
reached through a slow enough timetable to 
allow more discussion, and resolution of 
Trustee concerns about the future of higher 
education in the Commonwealth. 

Trustees Clark, Shearer and Spiller voted against the 
latter motion. 

Trustee Burack asked the Chairman to summarize the points 
that he would make when he spoke for the Board. The Chairman 
said he believed that he knew what the views were, and would 
rely on his notes. 

The principal concerns of the Trustees expressed at 
this meeting were: 



— That the Chancellor should have a vote on the central 



Board. 



— That the distribution of powers between the central 
Board and the segmental Boards should be clarified. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

— That the position of deputy chancellor should be 
clarified or eliminated. 

— That students should be represented on both the segmental 
Boards and on the central Board. 

— That the Secretary of Educational Affairs should be a 
voting member of the Board of Governors. 

— That the composition on the several boards is a matter 
which should be resolved. 

Several Trustees who were unable to attend the meeting 
had provided written statements, which follow: 

Statement of Trustee Gordon 

"I believe that a strong, central, lay Board encompassing 
all of public higher education is critically important. At the 
same time, however, I believe that the academic integrity of the 
University and the other institutions and campuses of the system 
should be protected. 

"I had misgivings about S. 1371 as originally filed, with 
its emphasis on aggregation of governing responsibilities, be- 
cause of its implications for the institutional integrity des- 
cribed above. I am also doubtful about the June 3 version, 
because I think it unwisely dilutes the necessary governing 
responsibilities of the central Board. 



"After reviewing each of the successive waves of amend- 
ments, in addition to the bill as originally filed, I have 
decided that the May 28 version gives to the central Board enough 
authority for it to speak convincingly for all of public higher 
education, while reserving to the segmental Boards enough authority 
for them to maintain the integrity of their campuses and institu- 
tions. " 

Statement of Trustee Carlson 

"Although I have been unable to attend the special informal 
meetings of the Board to consider problems of reorganization, I 
would like to summarize my views on the subject after studying 
the minutes of the May 24 meeting, the communications of the 
Secretary and the Governor and other background materials. I 
would make the following four points : 

"1. I share the view of Chairman Healey that the present 
mood of the legislature demands that action be taken now and not 
deferred. Furthermore, I do not believe that devoting months to 
further study would significantly alter the compromises that 
have been effected thus far. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"2. With respect to the discussion at the May 24 meeting, 
I find my position best expressed by Trustees Gordon and Spiller 
I cannot share with my friend Barney Troy, whose views I respect 
highly, his concern over the loss of identity of the University 
under a strong central Board, nor his confidence of the amiabilitjy 
of a well-staffed Board of Higher Education to provide the kind 
of educational and budgetary coordination that is needed. In 
particular, I believe the most urgent need of the Commonwealth 
is better differentiation of the respective missions of the 
University of Massachusetts, the Universities of Lowell and 
Southeastern Massachusetts, and particularly the State Colleges 
and the Community Colleges. Only a strong central Board with 
overall budget authority can accomplish this, in my opinion. 

"3. On the matter of appointments to a new central Board, 
I could support any method which insures that no single Governor 
can by direct appointment to either the central Board or any 
of the segmental Boards control the majority of any of these 
boards. Call this politicization if you will; it is in fact a 
political process and will remain so. 

"4. Finally, I believe the role of the Chancellor under 
S. 1371 is sound, so long as he serves at the pleasure of the 
central Board. Institutions of higher education, in my view, 
are enterprises of such size and complexity that the direct 
participation of even segmental Board members in governance is 
largely a myth. Therefore, only through a strong Chancellor, 
supported by a staff of very high caliber, can real progress 
be made in the direction of more and better education for the 
monies expended. As compared to the current segmental Boards, 
the role of the central governing Board would be even more 
policy oriented rather than governance oriented. 



"In conclusion, I feel that whatever the disagreements 
on language may be, S. 1371 represents the soundest approach 
among the various proposals that have been put forward. Further- 
more, I believe that the May 28 version of S. 1371 which estab- 
lishes a stronger central Board is to be preferred, but realis- 
tically I could comfortably go along with the June 3 amendments. 

Statement of Trustee Rowland 

"Mr. Chairman, I have read and compared the original draft 
of S. 1371, the May 28 amendments and the June 3 amendments. I 
am prepared at this time to give unenthusiastic support to the 
June 3 version, because I believe some reorganization is better 
than none, and because I believe it would still be a major step 
forward in strengthening all of public higher education and 
therefore in preserving fiscal autonomy, which is basic to main- 
taining high educational standards and quality operations. I 
must say, however, that I would have given stronger support to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the May 28 version, because I believe those amendments gave to 
the central governing board more responsibility and thus suf- 
ficient authority for it to govern higher education effectively 
as a single system. 

"The most important reservations I have about the June 3 
amendments, though by no means all, are the following: 

— The provision that requires a two-thirds vote before 
the central board may adopt or change a master plan 
inhibits the Board. 

— The provision which mandates that an appropriation 
must be allocated to the segments in the same pro- 
portions as was requested, regardless of legislative 
reduction, hamstrings the central board's oversight 
role and diminishes that board's ability to inter- 
face budget with the statewide programmatic plan. 

— Finally, the provision that gives to the segmental 
boards the authority to appoint the presidents of 
institutions rather than the central board, consti- 
tutes a reduction of the central board's actual 
authority. 

"In short, I believe that the June 3 version would create 
a governance structure with the potential to develop a good system 
of higher education, but would withhold from the central Board 
the authority it would need to be fully effective. Nevertheless, 
I reluctantly support it and urge that no further delay take 
place, as I mentioned in my earlier communication, if we in 
higher education are to get on with the job." 

The meeting was adjourned, subject to the recall of the 
Chairman, at 12:45 p.m. 



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OSlady^J Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ADDENDUM 4133 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



May 24, 1976 



Statement of Principles 
on Reorganization of Public Higher Education 



The Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
in informal session of the Board, and by subsequent review and 
comment of its members, has reviewed pending legislation respect- 
ing the reorganization of higher education, specifically S 1371, 
H 4623, H 4882, and without commentary on specific legislative 
provisions, endorses the following general principles it believes 
should guide future public and legislative consideration of the 
measures. 

1. There is a need to reorganize public higher education in 
the Commonwealth in order to achieve the following objectives: (a) 
the establishment of mechanisms for effective coordination, planning 
and evaluation, (b) the coherent development of budget and planning 
responsibilities in time of limited resources, (c) the enhancement 
of cooperation between public and private institutions, and (d) the 
clear delineation of authority and responsibility between the 
Secretary of Educational Affairs and the Board of Higher Education 
or its equivalent. 

2. The future of public higher education is too important 
to be endangered by the politicization of the reorganization pro- 
cess. The issue of who shall make initial appointments to the 
governing body should be separated from the issue of what form of 
reorganization is desirable. The goal must be a professionally 
crafted and structured reorganization that can assure quality, 
acknowledge diverse educational missions, and guarantee broad 
access. 

3. Fundamental to any reorganization must be the preserva- 
tion of fiscal autonomy under the principle of governance by lay 
boards. The governance process should maintain the principles and 
processes of academic governance involving the participation of 
faculty and students. 



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4. The integrity of the University of Massachusetts must 

be preserved in order to maintain the academic quality and educa- 
tional excellence which the campuses and the University have 
achieved. 

5. Public higher education should be unified by arrange- 
ments that assure overall budgeting, planning and program coher- 
ence in order to preserve and improve educational opportunities 
and diversities for students across the Commonwealth. On these 
matters it should speak with one voice. This is especially true 
in a time of fiscal scarcity and uncertain enrollments. 

6. Within a unified system of public higher education, 
governed by a central lay board, the segmental components should 
have operational identity and authority. The central board should 
have the authority for planning, budgeting and quality control. 
The segmental boards should be responsible for carrying out the 
mission of each of the segments within the context of the total 
system of public higher education. 

7. The continuation and improvement of an independent unit 
responsible for collegiate authority for the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and representative of both public and private higher 
education is required for the orderly accommodation of the public 
and private sectors. The inclusion of the private sector should 
be accompanied by the sharing of pertinent information and the 
acceptance of arrangements that assure appropriate accountability. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF RECONVENED MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 21, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Chancellor's Conference Room 

University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer , Burack, Clark, Croce, Cronin, Gordon, McNeil, 
Morgenthau, Spiller, Troy, Mr. Colby representing Trustee Win- 
throp, and Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Treasurer 
Johnson; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Mr. 
Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Abrams, Carlson, Conti, Dennis, Dukakijp 
Eddy, Fielding, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academi^ 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Bench, 
Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President 
Mr. White, the Assistant to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Tillona, 
Special Assistant to the Chancellor; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representat ive 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative; Professor 
Schwartz, Alternate Faculty Representative; Professor Patterson, 
Boyden Professor of the University 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Represen- 
tative 

Guest : Mr. Ames, Assistant Secretary of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 2:05 p.m. Chairman 
Healey called on President Wood, who reported briefly on the 
state employees strike as it affected the University. He said 
the University had been negotiating with the various unions rep- 
resenting classified staff for some time, as has the Office of 
Employee Relations within the Executive Office of Administration 
and Finance. But because the collective bargaining law recog- 
nizes its educational and autonomous character, the University 
has been granted the right to negotiate and act on its own. Mr. 
Janis then described the situation at the campuses. 

Chairman Healey then turned the meeting to its main 
business, reorganization of public higher education. The Chair- 



4137 



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Strike 



Reorganization 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

man said he had been present at the June 18 meeting of the Working 
Group, along with President Wood and Trustee Breyer. Later, Trus- 
tees Troy and Breyer had met with the Governor and Senate Presi- 
dent Harrington. He reported that he and Trustee Breyer had triec 
to convey the suggestions of the Board as expressed at the June 
14 session, and further amendments had been generated to S. 1371. 
He had made it clear at the meetings that neither he nor Trustee 
Breyer were actually speaking for the Board of Trustees. There 
had been a full exchange of views during these sessions, at which 
all the segments had been represented, and he believed that there 
was a consensus on these amendments, although some further changes; 
need to be made. He added that the Joint Committee on Education 
had requested the Working Group to meet with it in executive ses- 
sion on Thursday, June 25. 

President Wood explained that the Governor's Chief Sec- 
retary, David Liederman, had attended the session of the Working 
Group, and had praised its work, although he had again stressed 
the Governor's concern about an open process. Trustee Breyer 
then reported that Mr. Liederman had expressed three concerns on 
behalf of the Governor: (1) that there be real power on the 
segmental boards, (2) that some resolution was needed on the 
method by which appointments should be made, and (3) that some 
kind of a bill was needed. 

Trustee Breyer then reported that two proposals had 
been devised which dealt with the question of appointments: the 
"Serio plan" and the "Healey plan". Chairman Healey explained 
that the Serio plan called for reduction of the size of the Board 
of Governors, which would then be filled in the following fashion 
four Trustees each from the three largest segments, two each from 
Lowell and SMU, the Secretary of Educational Affairs added as a 
voting member, and four new gubernatorial appointments. The 
Healey plan was based on the view that all-new segmental Boards 
were not necessary. Under this plan, all of the vacancies created 
by the move to the central Board under the Serio plan would be 
filled by the Governor. The composition of the Segmental boards 
would therefore remain the same as under present statutory re- 
quirements, except that the size of the U/Mass Board would be 
reduced to a total of twenty-two members. 



The Chairman then asked Trustee Breyer to continue his 
report about the meeting with the Governor. Trustee Breyer said 
the Group had met with the Governor, Mr. Ames, Mr. Liederman and 
Mr. O'Donnell. The Group had conveyed to the Governor its sup- 
port for the bill, with certain amendments. It had described the 
"Serio" and "Healey" plans for composition of the central Board, 
but had expressed to the Governor a reluctance to get into the 
essentially political question of who would be appointed to it; 
this was a matter for others to decide. The Group had also made 
the point that it was in the posture of making suggestions to 
the Senate President about his bill. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Governor had implied, said Mr. Breyer, that he 
would be flexible about a reasonable bill, and he expressed sev- 
eral points: 

(1) that his instinct was for a bill soon, if it was 
a good one, but that if the segmental representatives object to 
the bill, the process should be slowed down. 

(2) that the segmental Boards should have real power, 
but that the Board of Governors should also have real power. 

(3) that if SMU is adamant against certain require- 
ments of the bill, perhaps exceptions should be considered. 

(4) that if the members of the Working Group believe 
there is something wrong with the bill, they should let him 
know about it. 

Trustee Troy reported that the Governor had said that 
he would be satisfied with the bill if the Trustees were, again 
apparently assuming that the members of the Working Group repre- 
sented the Boards. Trustee Gordon asked if the Governor had 
expressed any specific views about the bill, and Mr. Breyer said 
he had not. Mr. Ames added, however, that the Governor did not 
feel that the June 3 version was the satisfactory result he had 
hoped for. 

Mr. Breyer then reported that the Working Group then 
met with Senate President Harrington. The Senate President had 
expressed his thanks for its suggestions, and said he would sub- 
mit an amended bill to the Education Committee. He had seemed 
generally satisfied. Trustee Burack asked whether the Joint Ed- 
ucation Committee had seen any of the amendments, and asked also 
what form the bill would take when submitted to it. Mr. Breyer 
said he did not know, and Mr. Troy said he imagined that the 
Working Group would urge the latest amendment before the Commit- 
tee. The Senate President had asked the Working Group to meet 
with the Joint Education Committee and said that there would prob 
ably be a public hearing on the final bill. 

President Wood said he had reported to the Senate Pres- 
ident for the Working Group, and had outlined the areas in which 
it had reached agreement, such as on the role of deputy chancel- 
lors, and had reported on issues which it had agreed on but which 
were politically volatile, such as the grant of autonomy for the 
segmental Boards and the issue of single-item appropriations. 
The President had then indicated the areas in which deep differ- 
ences remained on the Working Group. One was the question of 
whether employees of private institutions could serve on any of 
the Boards; the Working Group had voted three to two against al- 
lowing such representation. It had agreed that there needed to 
be further consultation on the question of collegiate authority. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the question of private membership, Trustee Troy thanked the 
Board of Trustees for coming out against the proposed exclusion, 
which he said was critical. Trustee Breyer commented that appar- 
ently those segments who opposed membership of employees of pri- 
vate institutions did so because they believed that such persons 
might damage the interests of public higher education. The Chair- 
man remarked that persons who took the oath of office presumably 
would not be out to damage the University. 

Trustee Burack noted that the private institutions 
wanted equal representation on the proposed Postsecondary Commis- 
sion. She said she believed that this would be potentially detri- 
mental to public higher education. President Wood described the 
discussion which had taken place within the Working Group on this 
question, and then cited some of the language relating to the 
Commission in the new draft. Under the current amendments, the 
Postsecondary Commission would have five representatives from 
public higher education, five appointed by the Governor and three 
representatives of private higher education. The Commission woulc 
review both the quality and the need for programs of the public 
sector as well as part of the private sector, which is an expan- 
sion of the collegiate authority powers of the BHE . The review 
of private sector programs would, however, be limited to those 
private institutions which receive a general or special appropri- 
ation of public funds. The rationale of the new language was 
that (1) some instrument was needed for working out public policy 
with respect to the relations of public and private, and that 
(2) there ought to be some equivalency, if not numerical equality, 
of public and private representation on the Commission. 

Trustee Spiller asked how many private institutions did 
not receive a general or special appropriation, and President 
Wood replied that he would guess about ninety percent did not. 
Trustee Spiller expressed reservation about having three private 
representatives out of thirteen, when only a fraction of private 
institutions would be subject to the authority of the Commission. 
Trustee Gordon questioned the wisdom of giving the Commission 
authority to veto the purchase, say, of a piece of equipment by 
the public sector on the grounds that it duplicates equipment 
owned by the private sector, when the private sector may have 
access to outside funds while the public sector must go through 
the certificate of need process. Vice President Lynton replied 
that, under the present system, the BHE could pass on the quality 
of, but not the need for, a new program. Mr. Lynton said that 
under the current amendments, the Postsecondary Commission would 
have limited power to make judgments on the need for a program 
by the private sector, and would have representatives of the 
private sector as members. Chairman Healey said that representa- 
tion of the private sector was a difficult question, but that it 
should be recognized that everybody, public or private, has the 
interests of the students at heart. The private sector would 
continue to make a significant contribution to the Commonwealth, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as it had in the past, and it would be necessary to fit it into 
the plan in a reasonable and equitable way. 

The Board then discussed the relative relationship be- 
tween the Board of Governors and the segmental Boards. Trustee 
Troy said he was troubled by the provision that when the segmen- 
tal Board disagrees with the Board of Governors, the Board of 
Governors has the final say. He thought there should be a check 
of some kind on the powers of the Board of Governors. Trustee 
Gordon made the point that there were checks and balances at pres- 
ent in the governance system of the University. He said some per- 
sons were bothered by the staffing cost of the new system, but he 
asked what would be the staff cost for lengthy appeals by segments 
Trustee Breyer suggested that on major issues, there could perhaps 
be some appeal process for the segmental Board. He commented that 
the provisions in the bill which called for two-thirds majorities 
on certain override actions by the Board of Governors was an effor 
to make this distinction between major and minor issues. He said 
he had a terror of too much due process. It was finally agreed 
that the sense of the Board was that on major issues, a segmental 
Board would have the right to some form of judicial review, but 
such a process could be invoked only in disputes between one Board 
and the central Board; an individual institution in one of the 
multicampus segments could not make such an appeal. 

Discussion then took place about the position of the 
deputy chancellor, a subject which had caused much disquiet among 
Trustees at the previous meeting. Under the new amendments, the 
segmental Boards with more than one campus would have the option 
of appointing a deputy chancellor to oversee all the campuses. 
The deputy chancellor would be the representative of the Board of 
Trustees and would report directly to it, not to the Chancellor or 
the Board of Governors. The segmental Board would have the option 
of choosing one of the campus Presidents to serve as Chancellor or 
not, as it chose. The Chairman explained that the relationships 
between the segment level and the system level would be "board to 
board." Trustee Burack said she believed the position should be 
called something other than deputy chancellor, because it would 
seem to the outsider that a deputy chancellor would logically be a 
chancellor's deputy. 



Trustee Morgenthau asked whether it was possible, in the 
legislation as presently written, that the Board of Governors couljd 
decide by a two- thirds majority that all tenure decisions would 
thenceforth be made by it - the central board. Trustee Breyer said 
that the Board of Governors under the present version had the powe;jr 
to establish general tenure policy. Such a policy could conceiva- 
bly be part of a master plan, which would have to be adopted by a 
two-thirds vote. Strictly speaking, then, the Board of Governors 
would have that power. Mr. Lynton pointed out, however, that the 
bill gave to the segmental Board the power to grant tenure, and 
further provided that the segmental boards could delegate that power 



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4142 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to the campuses. The Board of Governors had no authority to grant 
tenure, under the statute. 

Trustee Morgenthau elaborated on her question. Does the 
bill, she said, include any barriers to pressure from an institu- 
tion, a section of which is being closed, for the absorption of 
tenured faculty by another institution? She said it ought not to 
be easy for a transfer of faculty from one institution to another 
Mr. Lynton said there were two questions: (1) could a faculty 
member claim the right to transfer between institutions within a 
segment, and (2) could such a person claim the right to transfer 
between segments? The first was the more difficult, since no one 
could reasonably claim the right to the second. He cited page 18 
section 8-d as support for the authority of the segmental Board 
to appoint the professional and nonprofessional staff at their 
institutions . 



Trustee Morgenthau said that "this mixes up the questions 
of whether one is granted tenure at the institution or in the seg- 
ment," and she said she was interested in the answer to that ques- 
tion. She was furthermore interested to know whether the answer 
to the question was the same for all segments. Several Trustees 
responded that it would be up to the segmental Board. Trustee 
Burack asked whether Trustee Morgenthau was asking what rights 
would the faculty of a community college have, as an example, 
which was merged with another. Could an untenured person of grea 
substance, posed the Chairman, be "bumped" by a tenured person of 
an institution being closed? and Mrs. Morgenthau added, "Could 
the young at one institution be bumped by the old from another?" 
She observed that the present practice was for tenure to be granted 
at the institutional level, and she did not want anything in the 
bill which would change this practice. Again it was stressed that 
the segments would have the power to make the decision. 

Trustee Cronin asked whether the Board of Governors, in 
exercising its power of general tenure policy, could decide on a 
policy-making basis that tenure could be granted only on an insti- 
tutional basis, and Counsel Bench replied that it could. Chan- 
cellor Bromery warned that adding specificity to the statute on 
this point might actually serve to bind the Boards, and Trustee 
Morgenthau agreed that "there is danger whichever way you decide 
it." Chairman Healey remarked that the amendment process on this 
bill had moved it generally toward greater power for the segmental 
Boards, but that the working out of all these details would have 
to come with experience. He also remarked that no system could 
be designed so perfectly that all problems could be excluded. 
Beyond a certain point, it would be up to the fairness, competence 
and good will of the members of the Boards themselves to work out 
unanticipated problems that arise. 

Three points were made on membership. Trustee Gordon 
said he believed strongly that the University Board of Trustees 



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4143 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

should have an alumni member. Trustee Cronin then said he was 
pleased that the June version of the bill had added another studenjt 
member to the segmental Board, but said he believed that a student 
member ought also to be on the Board of Governors. The Chairman 
said that the Working Group had discussed this, but had been unablp 
to resolve the problem of how such a person would be elected and 
who he or she would represent. Trustee Cronin replied that an 
intersegmental student panel was working on this problem and would 
make recommendations. The Board also agreed with Chancellor Bulge 
that Worcester students should be represented. Professor Boelcskevy 
then said that the Chairman and Trustee Breyer ought to press for 
faculty membership on the Board of Trustees, but the Chairman re- 
plied that the Working Group had opposed this on the grounds of 
potential conflict of interest. But he said faculty views would 
certainly continue to be heard, as they are heard now, though the 
Board policy of having official faculty representatives to the 
Board, which is not a statutory requirement. 

After further discussion, the meeting was adjourned, sub 
ject to recall of the chair, at 4:20 p.m. 



Board 
6/21/76 



/Xladyfl Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4144 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF THE RECONVENED MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 28, 1976; 2:30 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trus- 



4145 



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tees Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Croce, Cronin, Dennis, 
Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, 
Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mr. Colby represent 
ing Trustee Winthrop and Secretary Parks representing Trustee Duka 
kis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant 
Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Trustees Absent: Trustees Abrams, Eddy, Fielding, Okin and Shaler 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management 



and Business Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Mrs. Hanson, Budge 
Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant 
to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Brand, Associate Treasurer; 



Mr. Bischoff, Associate Provost; Ms. Tillona, Special Assistant 
to the Chancellor 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 



Control; Professors Boelcskevy and Schwartz, Faculty Representativ 
Mr. Larner, Director of Public Relations; Professor Patterson, Boy 
den Professor of the University; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Worcester : Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 



Guest : Richard Ames, Assistant Secretary of Educational Affairs 



es ; 



The meeting was reconvened at 2:40 p.m. Chairman Healey 
continuing his reports on the progress of reorganization of public 
higher education, reported that the Joint Education Committee of 
the General Court had met in executive session, with the members 
of the Working Group present. He said that he, the President, 
Trustee Breyer and Trustee Troy had been present, and he reported 
that the status of the Senate President's bill, S. 1371, was un- 
certain at this point. There had apparently been a great deal of 
confusion on the part of the members of the Committee as to the 
contents of the bill as finally drafted. They had not received 
copies of it until the night before and had probably not had a 
chance to read it. Chairman Healey 's impression had been that the 
members were not convinced that the kinds of delegations to the 
Board of Governors contemplated by the bill — the creation and merger 
of institutions, the parceling out of funds, the establishment of 
programs, etc. — were necessary. There seemed to be confusion among 



Reorganization 
of Higher 
Education 



4146 



Board 
6/28/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the legislators about some powers for the Board of Governors, 
which were in fact statutory powers already granted to the lay 
boards. There was clear opposition to reorganization of any kind 
on the part of two members of the Committee from southeastern 
Massachusetts, he said, and the others simply had not got past 
the point of giving up traditional legislative control and had 
not really delineated clearly new powers from old, which S. 1371 
would mandate for higher education. 

Trustee Troy said that the members of the Committee "had 
heard of reorganization," and apparently had "predispositions" on 
the subject. The Committee had not addressed itself to any of the 
issues to which the Working Group and the Board of Trustees had 
addressed themselves. President Wood said that the SMU contingent 
on the Working Group had determined to join the southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts legislative delegation in opposition to the bill and 
did so. Trustee Breyer described the meeting as "chaotic," be- 
cause the legislators had received the bill only a short time in 
advance and had tried to discuss the bill section by section from 
the beginning, which resulted in a discussion of specifics apart 
from the general principles, which he said tended to make it dif- 
ficult to have a coherent conversation. Later in the meeting, he 
said, after President Wood spoke, he had felt the Committee had 
begun to grasp the basic principles. 

Mr. Cass reported that the Committee had held another 
meeting this morning during which, among other things, the Board 
of Higher Education had been asked if it would be able to "handle 
the budget," if it had sufficient money and staff. Members of 
the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (AICUM) 
representing private higher education also testified at this ses- 
sion. The Committee had adjourned all further hearings until 
July 6 . 

Secretary Parks said that he and the Governor had offer 
ed several amendments to the bill, which had been sent to all 
Trustees. The Governor would find the bill unacceptable if it 
did not address itself to those amendments. He said these amend- 
ments had been "checked out" with the various segments of higher 
education, and they "had pretty well agreed that those amendments 
which we submitted were the kinds of things that they could rea- 
sonably support." 



A long discussion ensued about the wisdom and possibility 
of the Board of Trustees taking a formal position on the bill. 
Trustee Morgenthau said she believed the ball was in the General 
Court, that the bill itself was changing and that the Board should 
not at this time take a position. Trustee Burack agreed, and 
pointed out that further amendments needed to be considered, the 
Board has not discussed the Secretary's amendments, and she said 
it was not possible to have a clear idea of exactly what the Board 
would be voting on. She also observed that the Joint Committee 



I 



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4147 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on Education had not even heard about the several points of con- 
cern that this Board of Trustees had expressed, such as a griev- 
ance procedure, the position of deputy chancellor, private sector 
membership on the Postsecondary Commission and the Healey and 
Serrio plans. Two legislators on the Committee had called her to 
ask about these details. The Committee, she said, had got a bill 
absent these concerns, and therefore the Board could not take a 
position in support of the June 21 version. 

Trustee Breyer pointed out that the Committee had re- 
ceived the consensus draft of the bill, and that these concerns 
had not been a part of the segmental consensus. The Working Groub 
had felt, in his view, that the "political issues" of the bill, 
such as who would be appointed to the various Boards, were the 
business of the Legislature and the Governor. He said there had 
been no effort to keep the Board's concerns from the Joint Commit 
tee. President Wood recalled that the concerns generated as a 
result of the June 21 Trustee meeting were expressed on the assumb 
tion that the Working Group was to meet again before the meeting 
of the Joint Committee — but in fact it had not. Trustee Breyer 
stated his readiness to take an affirmative position on the bill 
if the Board felt this would be useful. He added that one way 
for the Board to approach the problem would be to take written 
positions, and to move toward a position from there. Chancellor 
Bromery warned that if the Trustees took no position on anything, 
we might wind up back with the February 4 draft of S. 1371. 

Trustee Gordon expressed his shock at the slowness with 
which the Board was moving. He said the Trustees had "built uni- 
versities" faster than it had moved on this issue, and suggested 
that if the Trustees do not take a position now on the principles 
of reorganization the Legislature would move on without their 
advice. He called this an "abdication." 

Secretary Parks said the Trustees were caught in a tan- 
gle of vested interests, that this was a difficult issue. He sai 
they should not abdicate, but should think these things through 
carefully and keep in mind what is best for the students. He sai 
he believed there should be some form of reorganization, and that 
everybody was agreed on this much. 

There was further discussion on the question of the 
Board's taking a position. The Chairman said there was a chance 
that a strong position by a governing body might have some influ- 
ence on the outcome. Trustee Clark said that since the Joint Com- 
mittee had asked for further suggestions, the Board ought to take 
advantage of this opportunity. Chairman Healey pointed out at 
this time that the Board should remember that the Joint Committee 
on Education was only the first stop for the bill. Since it had 
fiscal implications, it would also have to go to the Ways and 
Means Committee. 



Board 
6/28/76 



4148 



Board 
6/28/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At 3:25 p.m. President Wood made a motion which was 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session. 

The executive session ended at 4:40 p.m. 

Following the executive session, Chairman Healey announced 
that he had appointed a special committee, to be called the Ad Hoc 
Task Force on Reorganization, to be composed of himself, President 
Wood and Trustees Breyer, Cronin, Morgenthau and Troy. 

It was agreed that the Ad Hoc Task Force would review 
further the June 21 bill and proposed amendments from Secretary 
'Parks, the students, the Serio plan, etc., and prepare a short 
jstatement which would be sent to the rest of the Board. President 
Wood proposed that members of the Board might respond to the work 
of the Ad Hoc Task Force by poll. It was agreed that a polled vote 
/would be taken unless members of the Board required the Chairman 
to call a special meeting. 

Chairman Healey said that Trustee Carlson had offered 
a resolution which was discussed in the executive session. He 
then recognized Trustee Carlson who made the motion, which was 
seconded by Trustee Rowland, and it was 



VOTED : The Board of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts, mindful of the difficulty in maintaining con- 
tinuity of purpose in the face of confusing debates 
over reorganization of higher education in the Common 
wealth, over the fiscal priorities of the state, and 
in the stressful environment facing all institutions 
of public higher education in these times, now re- 
solves as follows: 

1. To reaffirm the unequivocal commitment made by 

this Board some seven years ago to the attainment 
of the highest possible quality in public higher 
education in Massachusetts; 



To reaffirm that the best means for delivery of 
this quality is a system of separate campuses 
with a high degree of autonomy in carrying on 
varying educational roles, but requiring the policy 
coordination of a strong and separate President's 
Office, effectively staffed; 



To affirm that, irrespective of the directions 
taken by the possible reorganization of higher 
education in the future, the Trustees express 
full confidence in the ongoing leadership of 
President Robert Wood, whose personal leadership 



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4149 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

vision, and commitment to quality, as well as to 
effective resource management, have contributed 
immeasurably to the attainment by this University 
of the position of leaderhsip it presently enjoys 

Trustees Breyer, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Gordon, 
Healey, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, Troy, 
Wood, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, and Mr. Colby rep- 
resenting Trustee Winthrop voted aye; Trustee Conti, and Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis voted nay; and Trustees Burack, 
Cronin and McNeil abstained. Ayes: sixteen ; nays: two ; absten- 
tions: three . 

The following remarks by Trustee Burack are hereby made 
a part of these minutes at her request: 

"I wish to be recorded as abstaining from voting on this 
motion on procedural and substantive grounds. The item and the 
resolution were introduced with no advance notice to the Board that 
it would be discussed (in spite of the fact that as late as the 
evening before I was informed by the secretary that we were meeting 
to hear a report on the Reorganization hearings held on June 24, 
1976). A few Trustees, however, clearly had been informed and 
were ready to make the motion and present it for immediate consid- 
eration and vote. The President's statement that he would 'continue 
to consult with the Chairman and a few key Trustees ' ( .' ) signals a 
continuance of what I consider poor policy. 

"I further question the propriety and even the legality 
of having this motion placed in this way, and also whether it coul(d 
be discussed in Executive Session, in light of the recently amend- 
ed Open Meeting Law in effect since January 1, 1976. 



"Substantively, I would be opposed to the vote since it 
would give prior approval to the actions of the President for the 
months ahead. Also, it reflects what is to me a fundamental prob- 
lem, namely the confusion between principles and personalities, 
between dissent and dissension, so that questions and criticism 
on issues have been construed as attacks on the President and the 
Office of the President. Before reaffirming what was referred to 
as the '1969 vote' of the Board, as contained in the Carlson Reso- 
lution and made part of the vote, which presumably established a 
'strong and independent President's Office,' it seems basic that 
the original policy vote in 1969 should at least have been brought 
before the current Board of Trustees for review and discussion in 
terms of today's circumstances and possibly different views. I 
do not accept the concept of 'for or against' the President as 
enunciated by one of the Trustees, otherwise why have a Board of 
Trustees? 

"It is entirely possible, and in my view advisable, for 
there to be disagreement and difference of opinion, without under- 



Board 
6/28/76 



4150 



Board 
6/28/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

mining the leadership of the chief executive officer of the Board 
of Trustees, or denying his real accomplishments and achievements 
as an educational leader of national renown. I believe, in fact, 
that the reverse is true, and that such 'open discussion' would 
enhance that reputation and his work for the University over the 
past several years. The same objectivity and independence which 
the Chairman and others have claimed as the right of the Presiden 
however, must always be retained and exercised by the Trustees: 
that, in my opinion, is the purpose of the Board of Trustees: to 
evaluate and judge the issues and options as presented, and then, 
to vote to establish policy that is in our judgment best for the 
students and the University as a whole." 



There being no further business to come before the Board, 
the June 1976 meeting was adjourned sine die at 4:42 p.m. 



LEladygJ Keith Hardy f 



Hardy 



I 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



\ 



I 



ATTENDANCE: 



I 



a 



and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Eller, Asso- 
ciate Vice President for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget 
Director; Mr. Prussing, Deputy Budget Director; Mr. Searson, Gener- 
al Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

August 4, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Chancellor's Conference Room 

University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey ; President Wood; Trus 



tees Abrams, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Croce, Cronin, Dennis, 
Gordon, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, Spiller, 
Winthrop ; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Calla- 
han representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing Trus 
tee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, 
Assistant Secretary, recording 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Breyer, Eddy, Okin, McNeil and Troy 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 



lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professors Boelcskevy and Schwartz, 
Faculty Representatives; Ms. 0' Shaughnessy , Affirmative Action 
Officer 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger 



Guest: Mr. Martus , Co-President of the UM/Amherst Student Govern- 



ment Association 

The meeting was convened at 2:07 p.m. The Chairman 
turned to the minutes of the June meeting and asked if there were 
any changes or corrections. Trustee Burack moved that her reasons 
for abstaining from the vote of the June 28 session be incorporated 
as a part of the record. There was no objection, and it was there- 
upon 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the June 1976 meeting 
of the Board of Trustees convened on June 2 and 
reconvened on June 14, June 21 and June 28, as 
amended . 

Upon motion and seconded at 2:15, it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss Honorary 
Degree candidates. 



4151 



Approval of 
Minutes 



Executive 
Session 



4152 



Board 
8/4/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Hospital Man- 
agement Board 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The executive session ended at 2:45. 

Chairman Healey sought and received the approval of 
the Trustees for the establishment of September 8 for the next 
meeting of the Board, in view of the date of Labor Day. He then 
asked for the concurrence of the Board in his appointments to the 
Hospital Management Board of the University of Massachusetts Med- 
ical Center. Upon motion made and seconded it was 

VOTED : Pursuant to the provisions of Article II, Section 
IV of the By-laws of the Medical Center of the 
University of Massachusetts as adopted on January 
7, 1976 (Doc. T76-034A) and as amended on June 3 
1976 (Doc. T76-100) , the Board of Trustees hereby 
appoints the following individuals to the desig- 
nated terms of membership on the Hospital Manage- 
ment Board of the University of Massachusetts 
Hospital at Worcester: 



I 



Appointive member 

Mr. Joseph Benedict 

89 Newton Street 

West Boylston, Mass. 01583 

Mr. Robert Bowditch 
15 Westland Street 
Worcester, Mass. 01601 

Mr. Richard H. Harrington 

23 Ipswich Street 

No. Andover, Mass. 01845 

Mr. Frederic W. Hillis 
3252 Chestnut Hill Ave. 
Athol, Mass. 01331 

Mrs. Russell E. Johnson 
110 Forest Drive 
Holden, Mass. 01520 

Dr. Anne Kibrick 
381 Clinton Road 
Brookline, Mass. 02146 

Sister Kathleen Popko , S.P 
Providence Mother House 
Holyoke, Mass. 01040 

Dr. Alonzo S. Yerby 
18 Draper Road 
Wayland, Mass. 017 78 



Term 



Three years 



One year 



Two years 



One year 



Two years 



Three years 



> 



Two years 



One year 



P 



I 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Pursuant to the provisions of Article III, Sectiop 
IV of the By-laws of the Medical Center of the 
University of Massachusetts and adopted on January 
7, 1976 (Doc. T76-034A) and as amended on June 3, 
1976 (Doc. T76-100), the Board of Trustees hereby 
appoints the following members of the Hospital 
Management Board of the University of Massachu- 
setts Hospital at Worcester as Chairman and as 
Vice Chairman, respectively: 



Chairman: Mr. Joseph Benedict 
89 Newton Street 
West Boylston, Mass. 



01583 



Vice Chairman: 



Trustee Gavin Robertson 
11 Birchwood Road 
Worcester, Mass. 01609 



4153 



Board 
8/4/76 



I 



Chairman Healey announced that in addition to Trusteje 
Robertson, he had appointed Trustees Croce and Cronin as Trustee 
members of the Hospital Management Board. 

Following these items, Chairman Healey recognized 
President Wood for his remarks. President Wood reported that, 
for the first time in several years, a University appropriation 
had been enacted near the beginning of a fiscal year. He report- 
ed that the budget was $108,075,025, and provided comparative in- 
formation with regard to House I, the FY 1976 budget, and specified 
the increases in line item accounts. The total increase over FY 
1976 was $7,994,928, or eight percent. 

Still on the budget, the President said he was pleasled 
to be able to report that, while the contact hour and critical 
need provisions had been eliminated from the appropriation act, 
the prohibition on merit increases had not been. He said this 
continuing prohibition was one of the most serious problems facinlg 
the University at the present time, and said much work would have 
to be done by his staff and by the Chancellors to find ways to 
come to grips with the problem. 



Remarks of the 
President 

University 
Budget 



a 



Speaking then to the subject of reorganization, the 
President said it was a fair statement that the situation had not 
changed materially since his memo of July 12. There were several 
causes which he said had led logically to the present situation: 
the regional sense of identity of SMU, divisions within and among 
Boards of Trustees and segmental chief executives and the disin- 
clination of the national academic community for a restructuring 
at this time. He said he had been grateful for the opportunity 
to express his own views, and he said he hoped that the Trustees 
regarded their own extraordinary efforts as worthwhile. 

The President reported on the University's role in 



Reorganization 



Summer Jobs 



4154 



Board 
8/4/76 



Columbia Point 
Peninsula 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Report 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor ' s 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the summer jobs program authorized by the Legislature under the 
initiative of Senators Owens and Kelly. He described some of the 
activities of a Committee on Program Coordination and Evaluation 
of which he was chairman. He said the committee was concerned 
that the educational as well as administrative aspects of the pro- 
gram be followed up after its completion, and he hoped that if the; 
program were regarded as successful, the University be given more 
advance warning next year so that it might do an even better job. 



The President then said that the development of the 
Columbia Point Peninsula was proceeding, and he hoped to be able 
to present new designs for the Kennedy Library to the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee in September. He also reported on an increase 
in alumni donations of 11.8 percent over last year. This concluded 
President Wood's report, and he called on Chancellor Bromery of 
the Amherst campus. 

Chancellor Bromery reported that he had accepted with 
regret the resignation of Robert Gage as Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs. He praised Dr. Gage's five years in the vice chan- 
cellorship and the previous ten years in building what he called 
one of the finest student health services in the country. He said 
that Dr. Gage planned to return to teaching in the School of Public 
Health. 

Dr. Bromery then reported that the Search Committee 
for the positions of Dean of the Schools of Education and Engineer- 
ing had made their recommendations, and he had designated individ-j 
uals whose names he said he would submit to the Board for its ap- j 
proval in due course. The names should more properly be kept con- 
fidential, but since the name of Dr. Mario Fantini had been public- 
ly identified as the choice for Dean of the School of Education, 
he could mention this choice publicly. The name of the Dean of 
Engineering he would release later. Chancellor Bromery reported 
that once he had completed another interview with one individual, 
he could submit to the Board for its approval his appointment of 
a new Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost. 

Finally, Chancellor Bromery asked on behalf of the 
campus that the Trustees return to the Amherst campus as a site 
for their meetings in the future. Chairman Healey replied that 
the present schedule called for the Trustees to meet at the Amherst 
campus in November. This completed Chancellor Bromery 's report, 
and President Wood called on Chancellor Golino of the Boston campus 

Chancellor Golino reported that the first fee-assisted 
summer session had been completed successfully, considering the 
lateness with which the announcement had been made: about 1,350 
students had participated. He said he would submit a full report 
in the fall. 

The search committee for Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 1 



I 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tration and Finance had received 240 applications, said Chancellor 
Golino, and he hoped that this process would be completed by some- 
time in October. This completed his remarks, and the President 
called on Chancellor Bulger of the Worcester campus. 

Chancellor Bulger told the Trustees that Dr. Brownell 
Wheeler, who had held the positions of Chairman of the Department 
of Surgery and Chief of Staff of the Hospital, had resigned the 
latter position to coincide with the arrival of Dr. Philip Caper 
as Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. Dr. Wheeler, he said, had 
carried out his dual role, which was an extremely difficult and 
sensitive one, with great selflessness, and he said he expected 
to propose some expression of appreciation at a subsequent meeting 
of the Board. Trustee Croce strongly concurred with Dr. Bulger's 
sentiments . 

Chancellor Bulger also provided information about the 
census of the Hospital and the types of patients currently being 
admitted, and he affirmed that the Hospital was right on schedule. 
The Hospital, he said, was providing an array of services to a 
patient population of which one-third is from the city of Worcester, 
one- third from the county and one-third from outside the county. 
This completed the Chancellor's and the President's reports. 

Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Spiller, who said 
that he did not believe that the successes of the President and 
his staff in securing the University's FY 1977 Budget should go 
unrecognized. The Trustees should recognize the work the Presi- 
dent has done on behalf of the University in getting this budget, 
and those who "throw stones" at the President should be made aware 
of his success in this area. 



a 



Board 
8/4/76 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Report 



Chairman Healey then turned to the report of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. The first item was the proposed approval of 
the Interim Privacy and Confidentiality Regulations in compliance 
with the Fair Information Practices Act (Doc. T77-005) . Mr. Janis 
explained that these regulations were compiled in compliance with 
state law. There was no discussion, and upon a motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To approve and adopt the University's Interim 
Privacy and Confidentiality Regulations (Doc. 
T77-005) under the Fair Information Practices 
Act (Chapter 66A of the General Laws); further, 
that the President is directed to report to the 
Executive Committee no later than the February, 
1977, meeting of the Board on the need for any 
amendments to the said regulations . 

The next item was the Affirmative Action Program at 
UM/Boston (Doc. T77-004) . Chancellor Golino described this as a 
"good solid program" directed at both students and staff. There 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



Confidentiality 
Regulations 
(Doc. T77-005) 



UM/Boston — 
Affirmative 
Action Program 
(Doc. T77-004) 



4156 



Board 
8/4/76 



UM/Boston — 
Use of 100 
Arlington 
Street 



UM/ Amherst , 
UM/Boston — 
Administrative 
Withdrawal 
(Docs. T77- 
006, T77-007) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were no questions or objections and it was 

VOTED : To adopt and approve the Affirmative Action 
Program of the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston which is contained in Trustee Docu- 
ment T77-004. 

VOTED ; That the University administration be directed 
to report to the Board concerning the present 
status of affirmative action relating to pur- 
chasing from minority vendors, and to develop 
and present to the Board a detailed affirmative 
action program for minority vendors in the area 
of purchasing. 

Chairman Healey then introduced a proposed change in 
the contract between the University and the Boston School Depart- 
ment for the use by the Department of 100 Arlington Street. Chan- 
cellor Golino explained that the Department would now need only 
two floors in the building and said that negotiations for altering 
the contract were under way. Upon motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston, to negotiate and 
execute an agreement with the City of Boston 
whereby for a period of time not extending 
beyond June 30, 1977, the seventh and eighth 
floors of the University's facilities at 100 
Arlington Street, Boston, may be occupied and 
utilized by the City for providing educational 
services and activities for students of the 
Madison Park High School in return for a payment 
for expenses attributable to the City's use of 
said facility. 

Trustee Croce proposed that the Trustees study the 
future use of the facilities at 100 Arlington Street, and Chairman 
Healey replied that this was a good idea and would be done. 

At the Chairman's request, Vice President Lynton ex- 
plained the genesis and character of the proposed regulations with 
regard to Administrative Withdrawal at the Amherst and Boston 
campuses (Docs. T77-006, T77-007) . There was no discussion and, 
upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To approve the Rules and Regulations Governing 
Administrative Withdrawal (Doc. T77-006) for 
UM/Amherst, and (Doc. T77-007) for UM/Boston, 
and that, effective the fall semester 1976, 
those rules and regulations become University 
policy at the respective campuses. 



f 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4157 



Board 
8/4/76 



I 



UM/Amherst — 



(Doc. T77-003) 



The final matter considered by the Executive Commit- 
tee had been a Classification of Position Title for Dean of Engi- 
neering at UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-003) . Chancellor Bromery explain- Classification 
ed that difficulties experienced in recruitment, along with the of Position 
University's relatively low position in salary for deans in com- Title 
parison to Universities of like size and stature, suggested the 
necessity for this change. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position Title 
as detailed in Doc. T77-003. 

VOTED : The Classification of Position Titles under the 
Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific week- 
ly salary rate which shall not be changed except 
by vote of the Board of Trustees and such classi- 
fication shall not be designated by any job group 
number or grade. 

VOTED ; In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 648 
of the Acts of 1962, the position title in the 
Professional Staff in Doc. T77-003 is classified 
at a weekly salary rate specified after the title 
of position in the schedule subject to subsequent 
ly being amended, revised, added to or repealed 
by the Board of Trustees under the provisions of 
said Chapter 648. 

Trustees Abrams, Burack, and Mrs. Bluestone opposed 
the motion. This completed the report of the Executive Committee 
and Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Carlson to report for the 
Committee on Budget and Finance. 



8 



The first item on that Committee's agenda, said Trusj- 
tee Carlson, had been a gratifying report that the net cost to 
the state of operating the University Hospital during FY 1976 had 
been within the $3.5 million ceiling established by the Trustees 
when the budget had been adopted. 

The second matter before the Committee had been a 
proposed Purchasing Policy (Doc. T77-001) . This policy had been 
designed to replace campus policies which had been in effect for 
several years. Upon a motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To approve and adopt the University of Massachu- 
setts Purchasing Policy as set forth in Trustee 
Document T77-001; further that the Board repeal 
the Purchasing Policy adopted by it on September 
17, 1962 (Doc. T63-017). 

Finally, Trustee Carlson came to Campus Center Fi- 



Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

University 
Hospital 

University 
Policy (Doc . 
T77-001) 



4158 



Board 
8/4/76 

UM/Amherst — 
Campus Center 
Financing 
(Doc. T77-009) 



Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



UM/Boston — 

Tenure 

Grievance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nancing (Doc. T77-009) , reporting that the Committee had voted to 
recommend authorization of a series of fund transfers to augment 
the cash flow of the Campus Center at UM/Amherst. A clerical er- 
ror had been made in the information about the income status of 
the Center provided to the Building Authority, which had been 
passed along to the bondholders in the prospectus when the bonds 
on Project #11 had been sold. It was now necessary to back up 
the representations made to the bondholders. Trustee Carlson 
explained the error and said steps were being taken to ensure 
that such errors not happen in the future. At the request of the; 
Chairman, Trustee Carlson listed the amounts of the transfers to 
be authorized, broken down by source. 



Trustee Cronin was recognized, and he said Chancellor 
Bromery and Dr. Gulko had been helpful in explaining this problem 
to him. He said he realized that this error would have to be rec- 
tified, and that he had attended the meeting of the Budget and 
Finance Committee with the intention of supporting the motion. 
He said, however, that he could not now support the motion becaus 
of the amendment which required the Amherst campus to repay the 
transfer of $60,000 from Trustee Trust Fund Reserve, should such 
a transfer become necessary. He regarded this as an inequitable 
burden on the Amherst campus in rectifying the error. A motion 
was made and seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University 

to make the transfers of funds as described in 
Trustee Document T77-009 in the event said 
transfers become necessary in order to ensure 
sufficient cash flow for the Campus Center during 
FY 1977; provided, however, that $60,000 be re- 
paid into the Trustee Reserve account within a 
period of three (3) years. 

Trustee Cronin opposed the motion. This completed 
the report of the Committee on Budget and Finance, and Chairman 
Healey recognized Secretary Hardy to read Trustee Troy's report 
for the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Chairman 
Healey commented that this was the first meeting that Trustee 
Troy had missed in fourteen years as a Trustee, and he said he 
believed that the Board could certainly indulge his absence in 
this case. 

Secretary Hardy reported that the Committee on Fac- 
ulty and Educational Policy had met on June 23 to review the re- 
cord of a faculty member from the Harbor Campus who had been de- 
nied tenure and who had asked the Committee to review the written 
record of his case. The Committee went into executive session 
and after careful discussion recommended to President Wood that 
the petitioner be given another year's appointment without preju^ 
dice to the tenure issue. The President had agreed to this rec- 
ommendation. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It had also recommended that an outside visiting com- 
mittee of distinguished scholars evaluate the petitioner's quali- 
fications and make recommendations for or against tenure. The Con 
mittee will also evaluate the department of the petitioner with 
particular emphasis upon the long-range plans and programs of the 
department and how these may shape or affect present and future 
personnel decisions. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : Notwithstanding the provisions of Part II, Section 
3.2, of Trustee Document T64-061, to authorize the 
President to extend the contract of Professor Mar^ 
tin Posner of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston to and including August 31, 1977; provided, 
that the extension of such contract shall not con- 
stitute the de facto award of tenure, and that this 
provision be specified in Professor Posner' s con- 
tract. 

President Wood informed the Trustees that this case 
highlighted several issues relating to the relationship between 
campus grievance procedure and the action of the President on 
tenure recommendations. The Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy plans to review tenure and grievance procedures at its Sep- 
tember meeting, he said. 



Secretary Parks was recognized, and he expressed 
strong objections on behalf of the Governor to the distribution 
to the Board by the Secretary of a Boston Globe article which had 
made statements about the intentions of the Governor toward the 
President of the University. President Wood responded that he had 
continued a practice begun by his predecessor of supplying perti- 
nent newspaper articles to the Trustees, particularly when an in- 
dividual Trustee was mentioned. Trustee Burack remarked that she 
believed that there was not too much, but too little, distribution 
of such articles to the Board, and that she believed such distri- 
bution should not be selective. The Chairman agreed with this 
point, but added that in more affluent days the Trustees had been 
provided with every article which appeared, through the use of a 
universal clipping service, and he said this was no longer possi- 
ble. 

There was no other business to come before the Board 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 



4159 



^Gladys! Keith Hardy " 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



Board 
8/4/76 



Distribution 
of news clip- 
pings 



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4160 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 8, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Chancellor's Conference Room 

University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey ; President Wood; Trus- 



tees Abrams, Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Cronin, Dennis 
Eddy, Gordon, Morgenthau, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, Troy; Mrs. 
Blues tone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Mrs. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin and Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant 
to the Secretary, recording 

Trustees Absent: Trustees Croce, McNeil, Robertson, Spiller and 



Winthrop 

Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management 



and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mrs. Hanson, 
Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Eller, Associate 
Vice President for University Policy; Mr. Prussing, Deputy Budget 
Director; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Ms. Taylor, Assistant to 
the Director, Office of the Budget; Mr. White, The Assistant to thje 
President 



UM/ Amherst 



Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel- 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Associate Pro- 
vost; Professor Burke, Acting Faculty Representative; Mr. Melley, 
Public Affairs Director; George Beatty, Assistant Director for 
Budget and Institutional Studies 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative; Professor 
Schwartz, alternate Faculty Representative; Mr. Larner, Director 
of Public Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, 
Budget Director; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. Robert Burke, representing the Kennedy Library Corpo- 



ration; Mr. Martus, Co-President of the UM/Amherst Student Govern- 
ment Association; Ms. Joan Pinck, Assistant Secretary, Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. John Stevens, Board of Higher 
Education 

The meeting was called to order at 2:05 p.m. Chairman 
Healey turned to the minutes of the previous meeting and upon mo- 
tion made and seconded, it was 



4161 



Approval of 
Minutes 



4162 



Board 
9/8/76 



Kennedy 
Library 



Appointment of 
Delegate to 
Board of Higher 
Education 



President 's 
Remarks 

Citywide 

Coordinating 

Council 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the August 4, 1976 
meeting. 

The first item of regular business was the Chairman's 
agenda, and Chairman Healey called on Mrs. Robinson to introduce 
Bob Burke of the Kennedy Library Corporation to comment on the 
model of the Library set up before the Trustees. Mrs. Robinson 
briefly sketched the status of the project, saying that the final 
deed transferring the land to the General Services Administration 
would be available for the Trustees to sign at a later meeting. 

Mr. Burke thanked the Trustees for their hospitality 
toward the Kennedy Library Corporation in offering their campuses 
as possible sites. He then drew their attention to the model and 
the various maps and aerial photographs displayed around the room, 
pointing out salient features of the design. He informed the Board 
of the expectation that the Library would begin construction in 
May 1977 and be completed 24 to 30 months thereafter at a cost of 
about $12 million. There were questions and discussion about park- 
ing space, the strength of the glass, and the numbers of visitors 
to the library. Chairman Healey thanked Mr. Burke on behalf of 
the Board for taking time to make this presentation. 

Next, the Chairman announced the appointment of Trustee 
Erline Shearer as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education to re 
place Trustee Troy, who had requested that he be relieved of this 
assignment. The Chairman then asked for the Board's concurrence, 
and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur in the appointment by the Chairman 
of the Board of Trustees of Erline Shearer as 
delegate from the Board of Trustees to the 
Board of Higher Education. 

This completed the Chairman's report, and he called on 
President Wood for his agenda. President Wood first explained 
his decision to accept Judge Garrity's appointment as Chairman of 
the Citywide Coordinating Council. This was not an appointment 
for which one volunteers, he said, but neither was it one which 
one disregards. It was an area in which he said he had a long- 
standing commitment. Three constraints had governed his deliber- 
ations; that the appointment be regarded as an individual appoint- 
ment, not to have an adverse impact on the University; second, 
that it not detract from his principal responsibility as Presi- 
dent; and third, that the structure and mandate of the Council be 
such that it be possible to do a good job. He had been satisfied 
in all of these concerns. He was particularly grateful to Trus- 
tees Clark and Shearer for their advice, and he said he appreciated 
the indulgence of the Board in allowing him to undertake this as- 
signment. He then recognized Chancellor Bromery of the Amherst 
campus . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery explained the upcoming participation 
of him and President Wood in the centennial celebration of Hok- 
kaido University in Japan. Hokkaido had been founded by President Chancellor's 



4163 



Board 
9/8/76 

UM/Amherst — 



Report 



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UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Report 



Clark of Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1876. Some years 
ago representatives of Hokkaido had planted a tree on President 
Clark's grave in Amherst, but later the tree had had to be cut 
down. However, a faculty member had fashioned the wood of the 
tree into a box with President Clark's bust on it. This box the 
President and Chancellor would take with them, containing papers 
of President Clark, to present to the President of Hokkaido. In 
addition, the Alumni Association of the University had given him 
a check to present to the Hokkaido Alumni Association to be used 
to increase exchanges between the two institutions. Chancellor 
Bromery also reported that he and President Wood were to receive 
honorary degrees. 

Finally, Chancellor Bromery reported that the Universitjy 
had opened on schedule, and that a good year was expected and an- 
ticipated. 

President Wood then called on Chancellor Golino, who 
read portions of a letter from the Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare praising the Affirmative Action program approved 
by the Board of Trustees on August 4, 1976. He read the followinjg 
excerpt from the letter: 

"...the affirmative action plan reflects a sincere 
commitment to educate the University community about 
the concept of Affirmative Action, the programs, 
policies, procedures and concrete goals it hopes to 
accomplish, and sets up the internal procedures and 
committees that will allow for students' and employees' 
input into developing and implementing the Affirmative 
Action Program. 

We are pleased that the plan reflects your strong 
personal commitment to the concepts of affirmative 
action and equal employment opportunity. The aggres- 
sive innovative ideas and methods incorporated in the 
University's plan may be used as a model in this Region." 

The Chancellor expressed his gratitude to Pamela 0' Shaughnessy , 
the campus' affirmative action officer, saying that she had done 
a remarkable job in the short space of a year. 

Chancellor Golino also reported on the opening of the 
campus, offering the enrollment figures for the campus as a whole 
as well as within each college. He also looked forward to a good 
year. 

Then, President Wood asked for Chancellor Bulger's com-j UM/Worcester- 
ments. Chancellor Bulger said that this was the Medical Center's Chancellor's 

Report 



4164 



Board 
9/8/76 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Amendment to 
Trustee By- 
Laws 



Delegation of 
Authority — 
President' s 
Office 



UM/ Worcester- 
Hospital By- 
Laws 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

first year as an academic-health sciences center. We are seeing 
the benefits, he said, of the investment in the Center, including 
the establishment of a hundred residency positions. Also, the 
opening of the Hospital makes possible in-service training of 
radiology technicians, nurses, emergency service personnel, and 
others. 

The Chancellor then reported on other activities to be- 
gin at the Center this year, such as the establishment of the sec 
ond "pain clinic" in the United States, and an aggressive contin- 
uing education program for physicians around the state, which has 
already begun. This, then, was a "watershed" year, and it was 
time now, he felt, to think of the Center as more than simply a 
facility for training medical students. This completed Chancello 
Bulger's and President Wood's report. 

The next category on the agenda was Reports of Standing 
Committees, and Chairman Healey reported for the Executive Commit 
tee. The first item of that Committee's report was a proposed 
amendment to the Trustee By-laws. This proposed amendment would 
set forth the conditions and the purposes under which the Board 
would go into executive session. The Committee had endorsed the 
amendment, but it was not to be voted by the full Board until the 
October meeting to allow for time for the Trustees to study it 
thoroughly. In the meantime, it would be provided to the Attorney 
General for his information. 



The second item was a proposed delegation of the Presi- 
dent's authority, in his absence, to the Senior Vice President 
for Academic Affairs. At Trustee Burack's suggestion, the motion 
was amended to affect only the period of the President's absence 
in Japan, while the idea of a general delegation of authority in 
the President's absence would be discussed at a later meeting. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Senior Vice President for Academic 

Affairs be authorized to act on behalf of the 
President of the University during his absence 
from September 11, 19 76 to September 25, 1976. 



The Chairman then turned to the By-Laws of the Univer- 
sity Hospital. Chancellor Bulger explained certain administrative 
delays in the preparation of the final By-Laws, which made a Trus- 
tee vote at this time impractical. He asked, therefore, that the 
date for Trustee approval be moved back six months. Upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To amend the vote of the Executive Committee of 

January 7, 1976 by striking that portion following 
the words, "...no later than..." and substituting 
therefor the following: "...February 2, 1977 after 
receiving the comments and recommendations of the 
University of Massachusetts Hospital Management Board." 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next matter related to liability insurance at the 
Medical Center. Trustee Carlson explained that the University 
had purchased medical malpractice insurance for non-physician 
patient service personnel last year. The premium had then been 
paid from trust funds since funds had not been in the budget for 
this purpose. This year's budget did include funds for this pur- 
pose, but the Comptroller of the Commonwealth had held up payment 
of the premium on the grounds that it was an improper use of statje 
funds. This was in spite of a ruling of the Attorney General to 
the contrary in a similar case involving Southeastern Massachusetts 
University. The motions would provide for contingency measures, 
should the difficulties not be resolved. Motions were made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To reaffirm the intention and commitment of the 
Board of Trustees that general and professional 
liability insurance be purchased and maintained 
for all University employees at the Medical School 
and the Teaching Hospital and to authorize the 
Treasurer of the University, in accordance with 
the President and the Chancellor of the Medical 
Center, to purchase and maintain such insurance 
policies as may be necessary and to utilize such 
funds including but not limited to state funds as 
may be available for the payment of premiums for 
such insurance; provided, however, that physician 
malpractice coverage shall continue to be available 
only to Full or Voluntary Full members of the Group 
Practice and the premiums or cost of such insurance 
shall continue to be paid through the Group Practice 

VOTED : That notwithstanding any provision of Trustee Docu- 
ment T75-144A to the contrary, the Chancellor/Dean 
of the Medical Center, or his designee, is author- 
ized to expend such funds from the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School Group Practice as may 
be necessary in order to ensure that general and 
professional liability insurance for all University 
employees at the Medical School and the Teaching 
Hospital is purchased and maintained; provided, 
however, that this authority shall exist only until 
such time as the dispute outlined in Trustee Document 
T77-023 is resolved or until such other time as the 
Trustees may specify. 



Board 
9/8/76 

UM/Worcester — 

Liability 

Insurance 



Secretary Parks abstained from both votes. 

Finally, the Executive Committee had recommended a re- 
quest by the Medical School that the Administrative Withdrawal 
Policy adopted last month for the Amherst campus (Doc. T7 7-006) 
be applied to the Medical School, as described in Doc. T77-015. 
There was no discussion, and it was moved, seconded and 



UM/Worcester — 

Administrative 

Withdrawal 

Policy (Docs. 

T77-006, 

T77-015) 



4166 



Board 
9/8/76 



Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

Investment 
Portfolio 

UM/Boston — 
Alfred R. 
Ferguson 
Prize Fund 
(Doc. T77-019) 



UM/Worcester — 
Authorization 
of Signature 



FY 1977 

Operating 

Budget 

(Doc. T77-008) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve the Rules and Regulations Governing 
Administrative Withdrawal (Doc. T77-006) at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as 
recommended in Doc. T77-015. 

This completed the report of the Executive Committee, 
and Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Carlson to report for the 
Committee on Budget and Finance. Trustee Carlson said the Commit 
tee had met earlier in the day, and had begun by authorizing 
Treasurer Johnson to make certain transactions with respect to 
the University's investment portfolio. 

The next matter had been the establishment of the Alfred 
R. Ferguson Prize Fund at UM/Boston. There was no discussion and 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; That the Alfred R. Ferguson Prize Fund be establish- 
ed as an endowment fund but invested separately from 
the regularly pooled assets in either a long-term 
savings account or high- interest certificate or ac- 
count for the purpose of awarding annually part or 
all of the interest earned during the preceding fis- 
cal year as a prize to junior or senior students who 
have done distinguished work in American Literature; 
recipients of the awards shall be selected by the 
English Department, College of Arts and Sciences, 
Harbor Campus. Undistributed income remaining on 
June 30 shall be added to the principal of the fund. 

Next the Committee had voted to recommend that the 
Board authorize the Bursar of the Worcester campus to sign certain 
types of documents. This was moved, seconded and it was 



VOTED ; To authorize Richard E. Keene, in his capacity 
as Bursar at the Worcester campus, to sign and 
execute State Receipt Vouchers and Batch Control 
Schedules processed by the Medical School and 
Hospital to the Comptroller of the Commonwealth. 

Last, the Committee had turned to the FY 1977 Operating 
Budget (Doc. T77-008) . Trustee Carlson said that the Committee 



had heard reports from the President, from the Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs, from the Budget Director and from 
the Chancellors of each campus. He then asked President Wood and 
Mrs. Hanson to repeat their presentations for the full Board. 

President Wood made several points: first, that he was 
pleased to be able to present an operating budget this year to 
coincide with the beginning of the academic year; second, the 
appropriation was smaller than that recommended by the Board, but 
it provided some relief in the filling of vacancies and in support 
facilities for student support services and academic affairs; 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

third, he said the Trustees would observe a number of changes in 
classification and budget preparation which get us to the next 
stage for appropriate modern budgeting. He cited as examples of 
the latter the addition for the first time of the common services 
category, the classification of expenses by actual activity, par- 
ticularly academic activity, and the inclusion of data comparative 
to recent years which displayed trend lines. The President said 
the University has not yet gone as far as it can to develop the 
kind of programmatic budget needed, as enrollments stabilize, to 
ensure academic quality and sufficient student support, but he 
said this budget was another step in that direction. 

Mrs. Hanson then provided comparisons between the oper- 
ating budget and that of the previous years, setting forth the 
percentage increases for the campuses. 

Secretary Parks said he would like to have a chance to 
study the changes in the budget and how they impact on the appro- 
priation. He would like to reserve the right to raise issues at 
a later date if there is some disagreement, and for this reason 
asked to be recorded as abstaining. President Wood welcomed Sec- 
retary Parks' desire for careful review and a discussion of issues 
but pointed out that an operating budget consists of the adjust- 
ments made from the original budget request submitted to conform 
with the appropriation of the Legislature. The funds then are re- 
allocated to the campuses, beginning with the campuses 1 own estab- 
lishment of priorities. Secretary Parks said he appreciated this, 
but wished for time to review the budget. 

Trustee Eddy said she appreciated this more realistic 
budget, saying that the economy of the Town of Amherst is closely 
tied to the University. Since there were to be no merit increases 
she said, would there be any cost-of-living increases? Secretary 
Parks said it was to be hoped that there would be a decision on 
this question soon. 

Trustee Burack referred to the mid-year performance re- 
view and asked how it worked and who reported to whom. Trustee 
Carlson explained that progress in performance against the budget 
is reviewed and the need for transfers is considered, and that un- 
foreseen problems are discussed and solutions for them found. 
Trustee Burack said she was referring to the FY 1978 maintenance 
budget request, and President Wood then explained the process by 
which the budget would be developed and brought to the Board. 
Trustee Carlson said that any Trustee was, of course, welcome to 
attend the meeting of the Budget and Finance Committee which would 
consider the budget. 

There was no other comment and, upon motion made and 
seconded it was 

VOTED : To approve the FY 1977 Operating Budget for the 
University of Massachusetts as contained in Doc. 
T77-008. 



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9/8/76 



4168 



Board 
9/8/76 



Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 

UM/Boston, 
UM/Worcester— 
Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T77- 
020, T77-021) 



UM/Boston — 

Award of 

Tenure 

(Doc. T77-002) 



Senior 

Academic 

Appointments 



Committee on 
Buildings 
and Grounds 

Columbia Point 
Peninsula 



UM/Boston — 
New Site 
Studies 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Parks abstained. 

This completed the report of the Budget and Finance 
Committee and Chairman Healey asked Trustee Troy to report for 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy 
presented first two Appointments with Tenure at UM/Boston and 
one at UM/Worcester (Docs. T77-020, T77-021) , then an Award of 
Tenure at UM/Boston (Doc. T77-002) . There was no discussion, anc 
upon motions made and seconded it was 

VOTED : To concur with the appointment with tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
of the individual named in Doc. T77-020. 

VOTED : To concur with the appointment with tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston of 
those individuals named in Doc. T77-021. 

VOTED : To concur with the President's award of tenure 
to the faculty member named in Doc. T77-002 at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Chairman Troy then asked Chancellor Bromery to make a 
comment on several pending appointments of senior academic admin- 
istrators. Chancellor Bromery said he wished to acquaint the 
Board with a problem which occurs with respect to appointment of 
senior administrators. When such persons are to hold tenured 
positions, it is necessary for their names to be submitted to the 
faculty for its recommendations. Their names then become widely 
known and frequently leak to the news media. 

This might prove a problem with the upcoming appoint- 
ment of a Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the candidate 
for which would soon be chosen by the Chancellor. Chancellor 
Bromery said he mentioned this because he did not wish the Board 
to feel, in the event the name of the candidate leaked, that 
their pending action was being circumvented. There was no way 
to completely solve this problem. 

Chairman Healey then asked Trustee Clark to report for 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, in the absence of Trustee 
Spiller. Trustee Clark reported on a number of items of discus- 
sion at the August 10 meeting, none of which had resulted in ac- 
tions. She said the President had brought the Committee up to 
date on developments on the Columbia Point Peninsula, those not 
directly connected to the University. These included discussions 
of the prospect of a facility for the Boston Opera Company, reno- 
vation of the housing project, and progress of the Kennedy Library 

The Architects Collaborative had presented new site 
studies which had been requested to determine the effect of the 
Kennedy Library and the proposed new archives building on the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

further development and functioning of the University. The stud- 
ies had indicated that there need be no significant constraints 
on campus development . 

Trustee Clark also reported on a discussion of a pro- 
posed new busway to serve the campus and the housing project. It 
had been felt that further discussions and meetings ought to take 
place between representatives of the Community and the MBTA befor 
the University could take a position. 

Finally, she said, Mr. Littlefield had given a report 
on the progress of the UM/Amherst revised safety program. He 
mentioned changes in prospective roadwork as a result of the re- 
scission by the Town Meeting of Amherst of an agreement with the 
University which would have allowed the closing of North Pleasant 
Street. This completed Trustee Clark's report. 

The Chairman now presented a proposed Personnel Action 
There was no objection, and it was 

VOTED ; To approve the Personnel Action at UM/Amherst 
contained in Doc. T77-022. 

and it was further 

VOTED ; That every personnel action shall be subject 
to the policies and procedures now in effect 
as subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under the provisions 
of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962. The classifi- 
cation, salary range and descriptive job speci- 
fication for each position to which a member of 
the professional staff is hereby appointed, pro- 
moted, transferred or determined shall be as 
hereafter determined by the Board of Trustees 
or under their authority. 

There being no further business to come before the 
Board, the meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 



4169 



Board 
9/8/76 



UM/Boston — 
MBTA Busway 



UM/Amherst — 
Campus Safety 



Personnel 
Action 



C&ladyi Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4170 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 6, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Faculty Conference Room 

Medical Sciences Building 

University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; Trustees Abrams , 
Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Cronin, Dennis, Eddy 
Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, 
Spiller, Troy; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing 
Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, 
Assistant Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the Secretary, 
recording 

Absent Trustees : President Wood; Trustees Croce, Okin and 
Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Managemen 
and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President and Director of the Institute 
for Labor Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant Vice President; 
Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant to the 
President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Br ornery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; 
Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative; Mr. Federow, Graduate 
Student Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Professor 
Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. Martus, Co-President of the UM/Amherst Student Gov- 
ernment Association 

The meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. Chairman 
Healey began by explaining that President Wood had had a long- 
standing commitment to attend an international conference on 
"Opportunities in Philanthropy" sponsored by the Josiah Macy, Jr. 
Foundation in Italy, which included among its participants the 
presidents of the major foundations of the United States and 
Europe. President Wood, he said, was delivering a paper on urban 
policy. This was the first meeting of the Board that the Presi- 



4171 



4172 



Board 
10/6/76 



Approval of 
Minutes 



Appointment 
of Delegate 
to BHE 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

dent had missed in his seven years as President. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were presented, and 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the September 8, 1976 
meeting. 

Next the Chairman informed the Trustees that, although 
Trustee Shearer had graciously agreed to serve as delegate to the 
Board of Higher Education, it had been brought to his attention 
since the last meeting that statute excludes state employees from 
serving on that board. Therefore he asked that the Board rescind 
the previous vote and continue Trustee Troy's appointment to this 
position. It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To rescind the action taken at the September 8, 1976 
meeting of the Board of Trustees with respect to the 
appointment of Erline Shearer as delegate to the 
Board of Higher Education and to concur in the ap- 
pointment by the Chairman of the Board of Trustees 
of Frederick S. Troy as delegate from the Board of 
Trustees to the Board of Higher Education. 

Chairman Healey called on Secretary Hardy, who recalled 
that in President Wood's report to the Trustees about his trip to 
Japan she had inadvertently left off the name of Professor Maki 
as a recipient of an honorary degree from Hokkaido University 
along with the President and Chancellor Bromery. 

Chairman Healey then recognized Chancellor Bromery of 
the Amherst campus for his remarks. Chancellor Bromery reviewed 
his and the President's visit to Hokkaido University in Japan, 
and reported that the President had signed an agreement formal- 
izing ongoing contacts between the two universities. He said he 
hoped that funds could be committed to the maintenance of this 
relationship . 

The Chancellor then expressed his pleasure at the 
quality of the two senior academic appointments to be acted upon 
later in the meeting. He said the campus was fortunate to have 
attracted two such qualified candidates. He also wished to thank 
Dean Alfange for his services as acting Vice Chancellor for Aca- 
demic Affairs, a job which he had filled admirably over the last 
fifteen months. Chairman Healey also expressed his thanks. 



Chancellor Bulger of the Worcester campus then spoke. 
He reported that the problem of the premium payment for insurance 
at the Medical Center which had been before the Board at its last 
meeting had been rectified by an opinion from the Attorney General 
which had provided that it was proper for certain kinds of liabil- 
ity insurance to be purchased with state funds. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Second, Chancellor Bulger told the Board that the 
Hospital Management Board had met for the first time and will be 
meeting regularly in the months ahead. 



Director 



Finally, he reported that Mr. John Stockwell, Hospital 
had resigned from the University to take a position 



I 



1 



elsewhere. Mr. Stockwell, who came to the Medical School with 
former Chancellor Soutter, had been part of "every brick and 
girder" which had been erected, and was also part of the real 
spirit of the Medical Center. Also Dr. Richard Walton, Chairman 
of the Department of Family Practice, had been forced to resign 
for reasons of health. He too would be missed, although he in- 
tended to retain his position as clinician and professor. This 
concluded the reports of the Chancellors. 

Trustee Gordon was recognized at this point to make a 
request that the Chancellors of the campuses ask the alumni orga- 
nizations on the campuses to consider designating a representative 
to attend the meetings of the Board of Trustees. There had been 
a gap in communications between the Trustees and the alumni, he 
said, and he hoped that reports on ways to rectify the situation 
could be made by the Chancellors at the next meeting. 

Chairman Healey then introduced the reports of the 
standing committees and reported himself for the Executive Commit- 
tee. The first item on the Executive Committee agenda had been 
consideration of a proposed rule or regulation for executive 
sessions of the Board of Trustees. He explained that the Commit- 
tee had voted to recommend at the September meeting that a by-law 
be adopted by the Board of Trustees governing the circumstances 
under which the Board may enter executive session, pending a 
ruling from the Attorney General as to whether the Board is sub- 
ject to the provisions of Chapter 30A, Sections 11A and 11B, the 
so-called open meeting law. At this morning's meeting, the 
Committee had discussed the matter further, and decided to rec- 
ommend that the "sunshine rule" be adopted in the form of a 
regulation for the time being. If the Attorney General should 
rule that the open meeting law does not apply to the Board of 
Trustees, then this rule could be incorporated into the By-Laws 
of the Board. If, on the other hand, he rules to the contrary, 
the rule would be rescinded. It was proposed that the Board of 
Trustees adopt the following rule or regulation for the regulatioiji 
of its own body and it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED ; Executive Sessions . By vote of a majority of the 

trustees present at any meeting, the Board may enter 
into executive session, closed to the public. 

Executive sessions may be held only for the 
following purposes: 

(1) to discuss the reputation and character, 



4173 



Board 
10/6/76 



Alumni 
Communications 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Executive 

Sessions 

Regulation 



4174 



Board 
10/6/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

physical condition or mental health as well 
as the professional competence of an indi- 
vidual; 

(2) to consider the discipline or dismissal of, 
or to hear complaints or charges brought 
against an individual; 

(3) to discuss strategy with respect to collec- 
tive bargaining or litigation if an open 
meeting may have a detrimental effect on 
the bargaining or litigating position of 
the university; 

(4) to discuss the deployment of security per- 
sonnel or devices; 

(5) to consider allegations of criminal miscon- 
duct; 



(6) to consider the purchase, exchange, lease 
or value of property or contracts if such 
discussions may have a detrimental effect 
on the negotiating position of the govern- 
mental body and a person, firm or corpora- 
tion; 

(7) to comply with the provisions of any general 
or specific law or federal grant-in-aid 
requirements ; 

(8) to consider the award of honorary degrees 
and other awards; 



(9) to consider the hiring or promotion of 
personnel; 

(10) to consider matters the disclosure of which 
might significantly frustrate the imple- 
mentation of a proposed university action. 

The vote shall be taken by roll call and the 
purpose of the session shall be announced in advance 

Trustees Abrams , Burack, Conti, Cronin, McNeil cast 
opposing votes. Trustee Eddy, non-voting member of the Board, 
expressed opposition in principle. 



Trustee Burack was recognized. She asked to be record-j 
ed as opposed to this motion because she believed it was based on 
the assumption that the Board of Trustees was not subject to the 
law. She said further that if the Legislature had intended for 

* Mrs . Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding also voted in 
opposition - see minutes of BOT meeting 11/3/76. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Board of Trustees — alone among all the governing bodies of 
the Commonwealth — to be exempt from the law, it would have specif 
ically so provided. Further, she said the language of the pro- 
posed rule was so broad as to justify an executive session on any 
pretext. She said she did not pretend to be learned in the law, 
but as a matter of conscience and of civil liberty did not see 
how the Board could be exempt from the law, and she said she be- 
lieved it "essential" for the Board to be subject to it. 

Trustee Breyer said that although it was odd procedure 
to have a vote first, and the debate afterward, he wished to set 
the record straight. He remarked that the issue of the executive 
session rule did not have "anything to do with whether we obey 
the law or whether we don't obey the law." It had been the unan- 
imous view of all present at this morning's executive committee 
meeting that if the open meeting law is found to apply to the 
Board of Trustees, the Board would abide by that finding. But 
suppose the law is found not to apply? Shall the Board have the 
discretion, he asked, in such a case to enter executive session 
for any reason, or shall it have a "sunshine rule" which limits 
the grounds on which exeuctive session may be invoked? 

If the Board was to have such a rule, continued Trustee 
Breyer, the next question was what it should be. Should the Boar 
simply adopt the law as its own by-law, or should it modify it? 
The argument for modification was that the state law might not 
adequately protect civil liberties, as for example the right to 
privacy: there was no provision in the law for a body to enter 
executive session when an open discussion would constitute an 
unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Nor was there provi- 
sion for executive sessions for the purpose of discussing negoti- 
ations for property other than real property. He did not believe 
that the rule as recommended by the Executive Committee was per- 
fect, but he believed that it was the best consensus of the 
Executive Committee and other Trustees present at this morning's 
meeting. 



The item following was a proposed Amendment to Article Amendment to 



4175 



Board 
10/6/76 



I 



IV, Section 2 of the Trustee By-Laws (Doc. T76-051) . There was 
no opposition expressed, and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That ARTICLE IV, SECTION 2, of the Trustee By-laws 

(Doc. T76-051) be rescinded in its entirety and that 
the following new section be inserted therefor: 

"SECTION 2. AMENDMENT, REVISION OR REPEAL OF 
BY-LAWS. These By-laws may be amended, revised or 
repealed by vote of a majority of the entire number 
of Trustees at any meeting of the Board of Trustees; 
provided, however, that the text of any amendment, 
revision or repeal as originally proposed shall be 
sent to the Trustees at least thirty days before the 
meeting. 



Trustee By- 
Laws 
(Doc. T76-051) 



4176 



Board 
10/6/76 

MassPIRG 



UM/ Amherst — 

Personnel 

Actions (Docs 

T77-025A, 

T77-034, 

T77-026, 

T77-033) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman moved then to the matter of the University 
relationship with the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Grou]j> 
(MassPIRG) , and explained that the Executive Committee had felt 
that it did not know enough about the issue to take any action. 
It had asked for reports which defined PIRG's activities more 
closely and its relationship with the University. 

The next matter was the Appointment of a Vice Chancellor 



for Academic Affairs and Provost and Professor of Political Science 



with Tenure (Docs. T77-025A, T77-034) , and an Appointment of a 
Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Civil Engineerf 



ing with Tenure (Docs. T77-026, T77-033) at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst. Chairman Healey called on Chancellor 
Bromery to elaborate on these appointments. Chancellor Bromery 
said the first person he wished to recommend was Dr. Paul L. 
Puryear, presently Provost of the Division of Social Science and 
Law at The Florida State University, for the position of Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost and the position of 
Professor of Political Science with Tenure. Dr. Puryear had been 
the recommended choice among five finalists offered by the search 
committee after a fifteen-month, nationwide search. He was a 
unique individual, the Chancellor said, because he had kept cur- 
rent in the scholarly developments of his field while sustaining 
the great pressures of an administrative position. He then calle 
attention to the laudatory letters of recommendation included in 
Dr. Puryear 's file, which he said were written by many interna- 
tionally known scholars in the political science field. For 
these reasons, said Chancellor Bromery, he enthusiastically rec- 
ommended Dr. Puryear for the Board's concurrence. 

Speaking then to the proposed appointment of a Dean of 
the School of Engineering, Chancellor Bromery said that he had 
again had the pleasure of concurring with the first choice among 
five candidates of the search committee. Dr. Russel C. Jones hadj 
had a distinguished career, and was also an individual who com- 
bined an administrative background with an exceptional scholarly 
background. He said he was most pleased to recommend concurrence 
with this appointment. 

After motions made and seconded, it was 



VOTED 



To concur along with the President in the appoint- 
ment by the Chancellor of Dr. Paul L. Puryear as 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set 
forth in Document T77-025. 



and further 



VOTED: 



To concur in the appointment by the President of 
Dr. Paul L. Puryear as Professor of Political Sciencje 
with tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as set forth in Document T77-025A. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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and also 

VOTED : 

It was then 
VOTED: 



To approve the personnel action as detailed in 
Document T77-034. 



To concur along with the President in the appoint- 
ment by the Chancellor of Dr. Russel C. Jones as 
Dean of the School of Engineering at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Docu- 
ment T77-026. 



and further 



VOTED: 



To concur in the appointment by the President of 
Dr. Russel C. Jones as Professor of Civil Engineer- 
ing with tenure at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst, as set forth in Document T77-026A. 



and also 



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4177 



Board 
10/6/76 



VOTED : To approve the personnel action as detailed in 
Document T77-033. 

It was further 



VOTED : Every personnel action shall be subject to the poli- 
cies and procedures now in effect as subsequently 
amended, revised, added to or repealed by the Board 
of Trustees with respect to professional personnel 
under provisions of Chapter 648, 1962. The classi- 
fication, salary range and descriptive job specifi- 
cation for each position to which a member of the 
professional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 
transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

Chairman Healey called attention to the list of names 
recommended by the Executive Committee for the award of Honorary Honorary 
Degrees at the 1977 Amherst campus Commencement. There were no Degrees 
objections, and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To confirm as recipients for Honorary Degrees to be 
awarded at the UM/Amherst 1977 Commencement those 
candidates approved in executive session of the 
Executive Committee on this date and instruct the 
Chancellor of the campus to proceed with necessary 
arrangements . 

This completed the report of the Executive Committee, 



4178 



Board 
10/6/76 

Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

FY 1978 Main- 
tenance Budget 
Request 
(Doc. T77-024) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the Chairman recognized Trustee Carlson for the report of the 
Committee on Budget and Finance. The first item was the proposed 
FY 1978 Maintenance Budget Request (Doc. T77-024) . Trustee 
Carlson first reiterated comments made at the Committee's meeting 
by the President, beginning with the comparative figures: the 
request for FY 1978 was $124 million, as compared with $116 mil- 
lion in FY 1977. The President had said that his first recommend- 
ed budget as President of the University, for FY 1970, had been 
$54 million. Although that was a 250 percent increase in raw 
numbers, the President had called attention to two factors. The 
first was inflation: since 1970 the purchasing power of a dollar, 
in terms of educational costs, had shrunk to sixty cents; the 
second was an increase in FTE student enrollment from 21,000 to 
30,000 over that period. Taking these factors into account, the 
annual per student cost has risen from $2,377 to $2,467 since 
1970, an increase of only $90 per student. He then reported on 
the character of the discussion of the meeting, referring the 
Trustees to the minutes for further detail. He said, in closing, 
that all members of the Committee had expressed admiration 
for the thoroughness and quality of the presentation, and he 
commended the budget offices of the President and the campuses. 
He then moved the question, and asked for Vice President Janis to 
add further background to the budget. 

Mr. Janis offered an analysis of the difference between 
a request budget, that being considered, and an operating budget, 
that approved by the Trustees for FY 1977 last month. This re- 
quest budget, he said, would turn into an operating budget when 
the Legislature appropriated funds for the University. The re- 
quest budget was somewhat vague as to details, he said, and delib- 
erately so. Its core is deliberately accurate, and its edges are 
deliberately blurred. The process which now begins, he continued, 
is the clarifying and sharpening of the details between now and 
the appropriation by the Legislature and the formation of the 
operating budget. 

Mr. Janis commented that the sixties were a period of 
expansion in higher education, and the mid-seventies were a 
period of real decrease of funding. Now as the University return 
to some degree of normalcy, it becomes necessary to define that 
normalcy. Normalcy does not mean, he stressed, a return to the 
"good old days"; it means filling vacancies to a tolerable degree, 
it means offering a few new courses where there is great demand, 
it means keeping the library from slipping further in its acqui- 
sitions, it means getting back on a reasonable physical mainte- 
nance schedule. Also, Mr. Janis said the normalcy he spoke of 
included building into the budgets the concept of prudent manage- 
ment and control. This he said was reflected in the common ser- 
vices portion, which brings together business services of a 
University-wide nature under one heading. Finally, the budget 
incorporates the linkage of planning and budgeting, which also 
is a development of the experience of the seventies. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Parks noted that the FY 1977 appropriation 
was $108 million, and this request was for $124 million, an in- 
crease of $16 million, making the University budget about 42 per 
cent of the total state budget for higher education. The Governor 
had asked all the cabinet secretaries, in view of the fiscal prob- 
lems of the Commonwealth, to maintain level funding. He asked 
that the Trustees reconsider the size of the increase, in view of 
the statement by Secretary Buckley that it would be necessary to 
raise taxes in order to support this budget increase. He under- 
stood, he said, that the Trustees consider their first obligation 
to be the welfare of the University, but he said that Trustees 
were also citizens, and as Trustee-citizens, they should see the 
need to pare this budget further. He did not mean to imply, said 
Secretary Parks, that the Board was being frivolous in recommend- 
ing this budget; he realized that it represented the best judg- 
ment of what its real needs were, but he stressed the necessity 
for the Trustees to consider the condition of the Commonwealth. 

Trustee Carlson said it would not be correct to say 
that this budget had not been prepared with due regard for the 
problems of the Commonwealth; he was sure that this awareness had 
operated at every level, from the campuses through the President's 
office. As for Secretary Buckley's statement that this budget 
would lead to a tax increase, Trustee Carlson said tax increases 
depended on a variety of factors, including other appropriations 
and programs in other state agencies. Further, Trustee Carlson 
pointed out that the Trustees as a Board were not in a position 
to deal with all the fiscal problems of the Commonwealth on a 
general level; the only body that can do that is the Legislature. 
Therefore, he said, it was the duty of the Board to present to 
the Legislature the most reasoned, conservative budget that it 
could come up with, and he said he believed that the Board had 
done so . 

Chancellor Bromery said the University had sustained 
cuts in both the FY 1976 and 1977 budgets, while maintaining 
stable enrollments, in recognition of the fiscal plight of the 
Commonwealth. He observed that a University was quite a bit 
different from other state agencies, in that it has little flexi- 
bility to move up and down: it was an institution that you build' 
on. You can maintain a condition of austerity for only so long, 
and then you have to consider cutting back enrollment. He added 
two other points: first, the Amherst campus would still have 
nearly 250 vacant positions, even if it receives all that it is 
asking for; second, if the campus were asking for a budget equal 
to that of two years ago, the request would be $7 million higher 
than at present. He recognized the Secretary's concerns, but 
emphasized that the campuses and the Trustees have taken into 
account the problems of the Commonwealth and have adjusted them- 
selves to these difficult times. 

Mr. Janis observed that the original requests from the 



4179 



Board 
10/6/76 



4180 



Board 
10/6/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

campuses, from which this budget had been developed, had been $132 
pillion. The President had not felt that the budget could be cut 
lower than $124 million without harming quality. He observed 
jfurther that, while this budget was $7 million higher than the 
request budget of FY 1977, 41 percent of this increase was direct-! 
ly attributable to inflation. He pointed out, finally, that a 
concern for higher education was as much a citizen issue as any 
other, and therefore a concern for higher education ±s_ a concern 
for the Commonwealth. 

Secretary Parks then 

MOVED : That the Maintenance Budget Request for FY 1978 be 
$108,075,079.00. 

Chairman Healey said the Trustees may have heard of the 
purchase for the first time by a syndicate of general obligations 
bonds of the Commonwealth at less than 7 percent. He said he be- 
lieved that the financial community was showing more confidence in 
the Commonwealth, and he said that the Governor, his cabinet and 
the Legislature deserved a great deal of credit for bringing this 
about. On the other hand, he said he agreed with Chancellor 
Bromery that the Board was at a crossroads : either the University 
was to be a quality operation or it was not. Without trying to 
throw the ultimate determination of priorities back onto the 
Executive Branch and the Legislature in any harsh terms, it was 
fair to say that this was where the final determination must rest 
It was for the Trustees to determine what the University's needs 
are. 

The motion was seconded, and upon a calling of the 
question, failed. Secretary Parks and Mrs. Bluestone represent- 
ing Trustee Fielding supported the motion. 

Chairman Healey recognized Mr. Martus, Co-President of 
the Student Government Association, and Mr. Martus criticized the 
increase in the Common Services category in view of the continued 
austerity in effect in academic areas. He called for more dia- 
logue on the formulation of this portion of the budget among the 
President's office, faculty and students. 

The question was moved, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the Maintenance Budget Request for Fiscal 
Year 1978 as set forth in Trustee Document T77-024. 

Secretary Parks and Mrs. Bluestone opposed the motion. 

Trustee Burack reported that she had received the budge 
materials on the previous Saturday, and she did not feel that was 
adequate time for an ample review. At the Chairman's request, 
Mr. Janis reviewed the time constraints within which the budget 
is formulated. These constraints are always compressed, and the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

budget offices do the best they can. Trustee Dennis said he was 
a CPA, but still did not understand the process. There was fur- 
ther discussion about ways in which to improve understanding of 
the budget-making process by Trustees, faculty and students. 

The next item was a proposed Fund Transfer at UM/ 
Worcester (Doc. T77-027) . There was a motion, which was seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the transfer of $1,374,000 from subsid- 
iary account 01 to subsidiary account 02 of appropri- 
ation item 7411-1006, the University Hospital at 
Worcester . 

Trustee Carlson, continuing his report, said that the 
next item had been a report on the Status of Affirmative Action 
in Purchasing. Mr. Janis had reported to the Committee that the 
University had already gone beyond what the federal guidelines 
require in its efforts in this area. There were several constrair 
however, such as the location of many minority-owned businesses 
outside the western Massachusetts area, and the results had not 
been impressive. There had been considerable discussion. A de- 
tailed plan for strengthening this effort and a detailed report 
will be made to the Executive Committee next month. This com- 
pleted the Committee's report. 

Chairman Healey recognized Trustee Troy to report for 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy 
said the Committee's first item at its meeting of September 29 
had been consideration of the two appointments voted earlier by 
the Board. The Committee had been enthusiastic about these 
appointments and had endorsed the President's and Chancellor's 
recommendations . 

The second item, he said, had been a Status Report on 
Tenure and Grievance, which had grown out of an earlier discussion 
of a tenure case. It was agreed that the Committee would conduct 
discussions over a period of several meetings to review the whole 
subject. At the September 29 meeting, Trustee Troy reported, Vice 
President Lynton had reviewed recent policy changes in this area, 
noting that the two major changes had been the establishment in 
1972 of the institutional need criterion in tenure considerations, 
and the delegation of tenure-awarding authority to the President. 
Mr. Lynton had reviewed the reasons for these changes. Mr. Lyntor 
had also described the development and the experience with the 
Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. T76-081) , which he believed had 
been on the whole successful. 

The Multicampus Academic Personnel Policy Committee 
intends to focus next on the grievance problem, and the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy intends to hear and discuss 
their recommendations at later meetings. Trustee Troy reported 



4181 



Board 
10/6/76 



UM/ Worcester — 
Fund Transfer 
(Doc. T77-027) 



ts, 



Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



Status Report 
on Tenure and 
Grievance 



4182 



Board 
10/6/76 



UM/Boston — 
Guidelines for 
Graduate 
Education 



DM/ Amherst — 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T77-029) 



Committee on 

Long-Range 

Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the Committee's discussion had been far-ranging, and he said 
he would not attempt to summarize it here. But the Committee 
intended to return to this subject, and he said he would, of 
course, keep the Board informed. 

The next matter had been a discussion of proposed Guide- 



lines for the Development of Graduate Education at UM/Boston. The 



report of the campus had been based upon a study made over a pericfd 
of many months by a faculty committee which had operated on the 
understanding that the Trustees had indicated that, while graduate 
education was not to be the campus's first priority, it was an 
important one, and that the time had come to think through and 
define possible types of graduate education. 



The report was intelligent and interesting, he said, but 
the Committee did not get around to discussing it because members 
of the Committee had felt that UM/Boston had far too many problems; 
to master in the undergraduate area before it could even think 
about developing graduate programs. He said he hoped that the 
Committee could discuss the report at a future meeting, since it 
deals with an interesting and important subject which the Trustees; 
will eventually have to address. All Trustees would agree, 
Trustee Troy said, that graduate work should not be developed at 
the expense of undergraduate programs, but he also said he be- 
lieved that in the years ahead it may complement, rather than 
compete with, undergraduate programs. He pointed out that 50 per- 
cent of the places contemplated would be reserved for graduates of 
the undergraduate colleges. 

The final item of business was consideration of the 
Preliminary Graduation Lists for September, 1976 at UM/ Amherst 

(Doc. T77-029) " 

seconded and 



There was no discussion, and it was moved, 



VOTED : To approve the preliminary graduation lists for 

September 1976 at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. 77-029, subject 
to the completion of all requirements as certified 
by the Recorder of that campus. 

This completed Trustee Troy's report. 

The Chairman then asked for the report of the Committee 
on Long-Range Planning, and recognized Trustee Rowland. 



Trustee Rowland reported that the Long-Range Planning 
Committee had met on September 29. Its primary agenda item had 
Report of Fine i been consideration of the Report of the Trustee Advisory Council 
Arts Council on the Fine Arts . Many of you would recall, she said, that the 

Council had been set up in the spring of 1974 by the vote of the 
Board and on the recommendation of the Long-Range Planning Commit- 
tee. Trustee Rowland said the Council's report was first rate 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and shows the evidence of two years of hard work and deliberation 
by a wide-ranging and gifted group of artists and educators. It 
set forth a convincing case, she said, for a review and adjust- 
ment in resources and priorities in order to make the arts a sig- 
nificant part of the undergraduate experience for all interested 
students. 

Trustee Rowland continued that, while recognizing the 
need for careful consideration by the campuses of the Council's 
specific recommendations, the Long-Range Planning Committee had 
developed a general policy statement on planning for the fine 
arts and a calendar for reaction and further review of the Coun- 
cil's report. She said the statement made clear the context and 
importance of the Trustees' concern and reflects both the Commit- 
tee's and her personal determination that the work of the Council 
would not simply be filed away. After discussion and amendments, 
the Committee had voted to recommend that the Board approve and 
adopt the Policy Statement on Planning for the Fine Arts. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the following policy statement 
on planning for the Fine Arts (Doc. T77-032) : 

The past five years have seen a 75 percent 
growth in fine arts enrollments at the University 
and a 92 percent increase in the number of graduate 
and specialized degrees candidates. With completion 
of the Fine Arts Center at Amherst, the University 
has an opportunity to give important support to the 
development of the arts in the Commonwealth and 
throughout New England. In the course of the next 
five years, the nature of the fine arts programs at 
Boston will be determined and construction of the 
Arts and Sciences building can make full development 
possible. Budgetary constraints and hiring freezes, 
however, threaten the quality of both present and 
future programs. In this context of opportunity and 
constraints, the Board of Trustees reaffirms its 
commitment to the importance of the fine arts in the 
educational program of the University, welcomes the 
report of the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts and 
its emphasis on broad undergraduate participation 
and selective graduate development, and urges contin- 
ued program evaluation and planning in these areas. 
Specifically, the Board requests 

1. That the Advisory Council be warmly com- 
mended for their extraordinary contribution to 
the University and asked to remain available 
for advice and consultation during the period of 
review. 



Board 
10/6/76 



4184 



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10/6/76 



UM/Boston — 
Guidelines 
for Graduate 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. That departmental, school, and campus plans 
now in preparation be reviewed by the appropriat 
Board committees in the context of the Council 
recommendations . 

3. That the President and Chancellor initiate 
a careful review of arts facility planning at 
the Harbor Campus including the implications of 
possible joint program activities with other 
educational and cultural institutions. 

4. That the President and Chancellor review 
and report to the Long-Range Planning Committee 
the steps necessary to establish the Fine Arts 
Center as a major resource serving both the 
University community and the Commonwealth. 

5. That the report and recommendations of the 
Advisory Council be referred to the Chancellors 
for appropriate campus review and comment. The 
Chancellors are asked to submit a detailed re- 
sponse to the Long-Range Planning and Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committees as soon as 
possible and in any case by February 1, 1977. 
This response should give priority attention 

. to the further identification of critical needs 
and the resources required to meet them. 



Trustee Burack said she thought this was a splendid re- 
port and commented that the Council was certainly a prestigious 
group. Chairman Healey then remarked, for the newer members of 
the Board, that Trustee Rowland had been "one woman's voice cryin 
in the wilderness" among a group of pragmatists who had not had 
her vision of the Fine Arts. She had been a leading influence 
in the progress the University had made in this area, including 
both programs and the Fine Arts Center, and he said she deserved 
the thanks of both the Board of Trustees and the campuses. 

Trustee Rowland then reported that the Committee on 
Long-Range Planning had also considered the Guidelines for Devel - 
opment of Graduate Education at UM/Boston . While no action was 
taken, there seemed to be general support for the approaches and 
planning framework suggested in the guidelines. The discussion 
of the Committee had focused on the relationship of the proposed 
graduate programs to the resources for undergraduate education, 
and to the priorities developed by the Committee on Long-Range 
Planning for the Boston campus (Doc. T75-167) and adopted by the 
Board two years ago. These priorities, Trustee Rowland recalled, 
had placed the selective development of graduate programs in 
third place after continued growth and diversification in under- 
graduate programs, and increased access through improved under- 
graduate, counseling and extended-day programs and through finan- 
cial aid. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Spaethling, she said, had made an eloquent 
statement of his belief in the necessity for graduate programs 
for academic survival and visibility. Several Trustees made 
statements in support of this view, while others indicated the 
need to keep in mind the statement of priorities in developing 
further the thinking on graduate education. Professor Spaethling 
had indicated the campus's intention to develop additional mate- 
rial on specific programs and resource requirements and, Trustee 
Rowland said, the Long-Range Planning Committee is scheduling a 
general progress review of the enrollment and priority guidelines 
for later in the year. This completed the report of the Committed 
on Long-Range Planning. 

The next report was given by Trustee Robertson for the 
Committee on Health Affairs. Trustee Robertson reviewed the 
remarks made by Chancellor Bulger on several topics, including a 
faculty retreat, the administration of the Medical Center, and 
affirmative action. 

Trustee Robertson then reported on the first meeting of 
the Hospital Management Board. This was primarily an orientation 
session, and he said he thought there would be at least one more 
such session before the Board gets down to its work. He then 
mentioned some of the prospective agenda items. 

The next item had been a discussion of the proposed 
Governance at the Medical School (Doc. T77-028) . The Committee 



Board 
10/6/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Governance a t 
had discussed the document at great length and had made suggestions the Med ical 
for changes. It had been pointed out that the document tried to School 
steer a middle course between the concept of primary responsibility (Doc. T77-028) 
and the traditionally more authoritarian model of medical school 
governance. Trustee Robertson reported that the Committee expect-- 
ed to act on the final document at its meeting next month, 



I 



Finally, the Committee had heard a report on the develop 
ments which had followed the adoption by the Trustees of the 
Interagency Agreement (Doc. T76-031C) . Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor 
for Health Affairs, had briefed the Committees on the great succe 
which the Medical Center had had in bringing the staffs of the 
Monson and Belchertown State Schools up to their full quotas. He 
had also reported on the details of the developing relationship 
between the Medical Center and Pondville State Hospital. Trustee 
Robertson called these efforts an exciting service being rendered 
to the Commonwealth by the Medical Center, and this completed his 
report. 

Chairman Healey then recognized Trustee Spiller for the 
report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. The first item 
presented by Trustee Spiller was a proposed Department of Public 
Works Busway (Docs. T77-030, T77-031) to serve the Harbor Campus 
and the Columbia Point project. 

A motion was made, seconded, and it was 



Committee on 
Health Affairs 

Chancellor' s 
Report 



Interagency 
s Agreement 

(Doc. T76-031C) 



Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

UM/Boston — 
DPW Busway 
Docs. T77-030, 
T77-031) 



4186 



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10/6/76 



UM/Boston- 

Gymnasium 

Delays 



Report of 
Delegate to 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University of 

Massachusetts at Boston to execute agreements with 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority for the 
construction of a roadway at the Harbor Campus and 
for the provision of bus service along said roadway; 
further, that said agreements be in accordance with 
the Draft Agreements set forth in Trustee Documents 
T77-030 and T77-031 or as the same may be amended 
through negotiation. 

Trustee Spiller then made some remarks about the UM/ 
Boston gymnasium, which has been in planning and design for sev- 
eral years. The project had been funded several years ago, and 
the drawings are now ready to go to bid, but the approval to ad- 
vertise has not been received by the Bureau of Building Construc- 
tion. There seems to be a problem, he said, in identifying which 
Executive Office is responsible for the delay. Trustee Spiller 
compared this problem to a "shell game." He expressed regret 
that Secretary Parks had left the Board meeting and could not hear 
his report. Each day's delay, he said, will reduce the project 
through cost escalation. He stressed that this was a facility to 
be used by the Community as well as by the campus, and said that 
the Community was integrally involved in its planning. 

Trustee Spiller said that the Committee had then briefly 
discussed capital outlay issues, and would need to do more work 
on this subject before it could make a report to the Board. This 
concluded her report. 

Chairman Healey then called again on Trustee Troy for 
his report as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee 
Troy reported that the BHE had met on September 20, and had dis- 
cussed a staff document that, first, had spelled out the statutory 
responsibilities of the Board of Higher Education; and second, 
the serious inadequacy of personnel in terms of the Board's re- 
sponsibilities and duties. The discussion had been far-ranging, 
but it came to two conclusions, one short-range and the other 
long-range: the necessity of beefing up the staff to at least 29 
out of 41 requested positions, and the need for redefinition and 
clarification of the duties and responsibilities of the Board, 
particularly in relation to those of the Secretary of Educational 
Affairs. The Board felt that it was at an impasse with respect 
to the first issue, and felt that it would need the support of 
the segments to convince the General Court that it cannot fulfill 
its duties without an adequate budget. 



At its September 24 meeting, said Trustee Troy, the 
Board had granted permanent approval to the University without 
Walls Program at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 
This completed Trustee Troy's report. 

Chairman Healey then recognized Trustee Conti. Trustee 



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4187 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Conti said that several faculty members had reported to her that 
Chancellor Golino had quoted her before faculty meetings as havin 
said that "graduate education is ridiculous" when graduate educa- 
tion at UM/Boston had been discussed before the Trustee Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy. She denied having said this 
and stated her interest in the report, but also her concern for 
the improvement of undergraduate education. 



Second, she said there was concern on the campus that 
this matter had already been brought before the Trustees before 
having been submitted to campus governance for approval. Chan- 
cellor Golino explained that the guidelines for graduate educatioh 
had gone through a first reading in the Assembly, but had not gon 2 
through a second reading because the Assembly, after five attempt^, 
could not get a quorum. He had then consulted the leadership of 
the Assembly, and it had advised him to take the document before 
the Trustees for discussion. As for any comments he might have 
made before the faculty, he advised Trustee Conti against forming 
conclusions on the basis of heresay. 

There was no further business to come before the Trus- 
tees and the meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 



Board 
10/6/76 



4ladysVKeith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustee^ 



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4188 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

November 3, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
Auditorium 
Memorial Hall 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Abrams, Breyer , Burack, Clark, Conti, Croce, Cronin, 
Dennis, McNeil, Shaler, Shearer, Spiller, Troy, Winthrop ; Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Mrs. Bluestone representing 
Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller; 
Miss Eichel, recording 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Anrig, Carlson, Eddy, Gordon, Morgen- 



thau, Okin, Robertson, Rowland 

Office of the President: Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 



and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Eller , 
Associate Vice President for Planning; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Directc 
and Assistant Vice President; Mr. O'Leary, Associate Counsel to 
the University; Mr. Prussing, Deputy Budget Director; Mr. White, 
The Assistant to the President and Director of Public Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Br ornery; Mr. Puryear , Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancelloi 
for Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; Professor Sulznei , 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Federow, Graduate Student Representa- 
tive 



UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; Professor Boelc 
Faculty Representative 



skevy 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 



Health Affairs; Professor Goodman, Chairman, Department of Physiol 

ogy 

Guests : Members of the Amherst Faculty Senate Rules Committee 



The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m. by Chairmar 
Healey, who began by thanking the UM/Amherst Alumni Association 
for extending the invitation to the Board to meet in Memorial Hall 
He said the Board was grateful to have the opportunity to meet in 
such gracious surroundings and asked that thanks be extended to 
Mr. Parnell, President of the Alumni Association, and the staff 
for making the Hall available to the Trustees. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the matter of approval of 
the minutes of the previous meeting. He said that Mrs. Bluestone 



4189 



4190 



Board 
11/3/76 



Approval of 
Minutes 

President' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had called attention to the fact that her name had been omitted 
from the list of Trustees opposing the vote on executive sessions 
of the Board. It was agreed that the Secretary would amend the 
minutes to correct this omission and on motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the October 6, 1976 meeting 
as amended. 

Chairman Healey asked President Wood for his comments. 
President Wood began by thanking the Board for allowing him to be 
absent from the October Board meeting in order to visit Hokkaido 
University in Japan and to attend an international conference in 
Italy on opportunities in philanthropy. It was, he said, like a 
mini-sabbatical. He then said he would like to speak briefly on 
four matters, 1) capital outlay, 2) Columbia Point development, 
3) planning for the year, and 4) the State Auditor's Reports, whidh 
had been received by the Trustees. 

With regard to capital outlay for FY 1977, President Woe 
said that the Legislature had appropriated a total of $8.4 millior 
to the University for the three campuses and the field stations. 
In addition it had appropriated $500,000 for planning of the State 
Archives building which had been requested by Secretary of State 
Paul Guzzi. For FY 1978 the initial capital outlay request of 
$12,425 million will be considered by the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds. This is a tentative figure which was submitted to 
the Executive Office of Administration and Finance upon its request, 
but it will be reviewed further in the next two weeks by the cam- 
puses before the final request will come to the Trustees. He saic 
that although in raw numbers this request may seem large, particu- 
larly in a period of fiscal stringency, it should be viewed in the 
context of a period in which the University completed rapid growtt 
and expansion and in the context of its relation to maintenance 
and other investments of the University. 

The FY 1978 Maintenance Budget Request voted by the 
Board in October represented a smaller percentage of increase over 
the previous year than the requests of any other segment of public 
higher education, he said, as evidenced by the following figures: 



Institution 



State Colleges 
Community Colleges 



University of Lowell 



S.M.U. 



U/Massachusetts 



Increase 
in Dollars 

$9.9 million 

15.7 million 

3.4 million 

3.8 million 

16 . 3 million 



Percent 
of Increase 


17 


.1% 


37 


.7% 


20 


4% 


35 


5% 


15 


0% 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Indicating yet another dimension of the status and char- 
acter of the University's requirement for fiscal resources, Presi- 
dent Wood mentioned that the October 25 issue of The Chronicle of 
Higher Education reported the following four series of figures 



ions 



4191 



Board 
11/3/76 



which are of interest in considering where the University stands 
nationally and where it has come from. The report stated that ove 
the last ten years, Massachusetts had risen from nineteenth to 
fifth in the nation in the rate of increases of state appropriat 
and in the last two years when the fiscal crisis was most severe 
Massachusetts ranked thirty-first in the nation in educational sup 
port. Although the Commonwealth has moved ahead in the decade and 
even in the last two years, he said, Massachusetts still ranks 
forty-eighth in the nation in terms of educational support per 
capita and forty-eighth in terms of educational support per $1000 
personnel income. Many factors are involved, he said, 1) the role 
of the private sector in higher education as a major export indus- 
try of which Massachusetts should be proud, 2) the late start of 
public higher education, 3) the character of the Massachusetts 
tax base, and 4) the problems in Massachusetts industry. Massa- 
chusetts higher education, he said, is still on the borderline of 
poverty when compared to other universities in the nation with 
which the University presumes to be competitive. He said Massachu 
setts' support of higher education still ranks with Maine, New 
Hampshire and New Jersey, which are not distinguished in terms of 
the quality of education. He said he hoped as the Trustees con- 
sider the capital outlay budget and as the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds considers five-year plans, these factors would be kept 
in mind. 



Referring to an article by Dan Ahern in the Herald , Pres 
ident Wood said the University had been accused of attempting to 
build a "low-land acropolis" at Columbia Point, which, he said, 
he thought was a contradiction in terms. Mr. Ahern had inquired 
whether the University really wanted an Opera House. President 
Wood said that what the University really wants is a viable devel- 
opment of the peninsula that speaks to the needs of the community, 
that speaks to the completion of the plans of the University to a 
full-scale campus, that speaks to the healthy marriage between 
cultural and intellectual affairs, human affairs and sound economic 
development. Therefore, he said, the University welcomes the 
Kennedy Library, the State Archives, and the possibility of the 
Opera House and particularly, the interest, energy and commitment 
of the private sector in the development of the community. Mr. 
Ephron Catlin, Treasurer of the Affiliated Hospitals, financial 
consultant for Tucker, Anthony and R.L. Day, and recently retired 
Executive Vice President of the First National Bank, has agreed 
to chair a committee of community and business leaders, which in- 
cludes Trustee Spiller, who are concerned with the future of the 
Columbia Point peninsula. Through these efforts, said President 
Wood, a former city dump is on the way to becoming a magnet area 
for the Boston region and Massachusetts in general. 

President Wood said that on the evening before this Board 



4192 



Board 
11/3/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

meeting, the Chancellors' Council had met to begin a process whiclp. 
will coordinate academic planning with budgeting. He said that 
such planning had been mandated at an informal Trustee meeting at 
; Parkman House in January, 1975, and had begun with a planning 
exercise in February, 1975, which had been interrupted by the 
budget crisis in the Commonwealth. Now that this crisis was over 
the University, he said, would resume the development of capital 
outlay and operating budgets with the planning of program priori- 
ties as parts of a single total master planning process. 

President Wood then turned to the matter of the State 
Auditor's Reports. Reports for FY 1975 for UM/Amherst and UM/ 
Worcester were on hand, he said, and the report for UM/Boston had 
been completed, but had not yet been received. He indicated that 
comments from the Trustees would be welcome. The reports are be- 
ing reviewed by the campuses and their comments will be coordi- 
nated by the University Controller and forwarded to the Executive 
Office of Administration and Finance. Any action taken, he said, 
would be reported to the Board. 



President Wood said that this completed his report and 
he called upon Chancellor Bromery for his remarks . Chancellor 
Bromery began by welcoming the Trustees back to the Amherst Cam- 
pus. He then introduced the new Vice Chancellor for Academic Af- 
fairs and Provost at UM/Amherst, Dr. Paul Puryear. Chancellor 
Bromery, referring to the article in the Herald mentioned by the 
President, said he was speaking also for his Five College col- 
leagues when he said the Amherst campus does not consider itself 
a bunch of buildings rising in the midst of cornfields. He said 
it was an intellectual community and that aside, the cornfields 
were some of the most productive cornfields in the country. 



Continuing, Chancellor Bromery said that Dr. Lewis Kil- 
lian had given the first lecture of the Chancellor's Lecture Series 
comparing school busing here and in England. He extended an in- 
vitation to Trustees to attend this lecture series. Last, he in-; 
formed the Trustees that the State Labor Relations Board had made 
its decision on unit determination and dates had been set for col- 
lective bargaining elections at UM/Amherst on December 1 and 2. 

At the request of the President Chancellor Golino re- 
ported next. He said that he had received the preliminary report 
of the Unification Committee on the merger of the two liberal arts 
colleges at UM/Boston. Reports from other groups are coming in, 
he said, and he hoped to have a complete packet for distribution 
to the Trustees by the end of November. 



The President then called on Chancellor Bulger, who re- 
ported that the Medical School had received a three-year accred- 
itation. He next introduced the new Vice Chancellor for Health 
Affairs at the Medical School, Dr. Philip Caper. 



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4193 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey, explaining that Trustee Shaler had to 
depart early from the meeting, next called for the report of the 
Committee on Student Affairs. Trustee Shaler reported that the 
Committee had met on October 25 and had discussed the matter of 
Student Support Services at UM/Boston. This subject had been an 
area of concern to Trustees for several years, and the problems 
were compounded, he said, by the merger of Colleges I and II. The 
Chancellor, he said, had spoken about an interim report being pre- 
pared on campus and had said that until this report had been com- 
pleted, and the problems resolved, the ten positions set aside for 
student services would not be filled. The Chair, at the time, 
said Trustee Shaler, had felt the report on the fundamental issues 
of student support services on the Boston Campus submitted to the 
Committee had not taken into account the guidelines set forth in 
the so-called Gage Report, which had been approved earlier by the 
Trustees. The current UM/Boston report, he said, seemed to advo- 
cate a traditional approach and did not take into account such 
issues as relationships between affirmative action and student sup 
port, student identification, or an outreach approach. The dis- 
cussion closed, he said, with an expectation of a final report 
which will reflect the Trustee guidelines of the past, the present 
state of affairs, what implementation has taken place, and further 
steps planned for the delivery of student support services respon- 
sive to Trustee policy and concerns. This report is to be complet 
by the end of the month. 

The other item of agenda, he said, was discussion of the 
forthcoming report on MassPIRG. The report, he said, would exam- 
ine the various funding mechanisms, information as to national 
patterns and activities, the kinds of institutions participating 
and an elaboration of various legal issues involved. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the report of the Execu- 
tive Committee, stating that the first item of agenda was the mat- 
ter of Collective Bargaining. He said that the Board had histor- 
ically supported the position of the administration in opposing 
collective bargaining as a substitute for the governance process. 
He said that as there were several new members of the Board since 
this subject had last arisen, he felt it appropriate for the Board 
to look at the policy question to determine its current posture. 
He then asked President Wood to speak. President Wood said that 
the election on the question of faculty unionization had been 
scheduled for December 1 and 2. He said that he had restated his 
personal position that unionization is not an effective response 
to faculty concerns at both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston. He said the 
Board had received copies of his remarks at UM/Amherst, which stat 
ed his position. One major difference from the last election, he 
said, is that one unit is proposed for both campuses, whereas the 
last time the matter had concerned only UM/Amherst. 

Chancellor Bromery said that the decision of the State 
Labor Relations Board had been circulated on campus. He said that 



Board 
11/3/76 

Report of 
Committee on 
Student Affairs 

Student Support 
Services 



MassPIRG 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Collective 
Bargaining 



4194 



Board 
11/3/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

compared to units at other institutions, the proposed unit was 
complex and broad, including traditional full-time professors, 
associate professors, assistant professors, and lecturers, as 
well as all part-time and visiting faculty who have served a spec- 
ified amount of time at the institution; it also includes librar- 
ians and some staff associates and staff assistants on campus, 
such as those at the University Without Walls, University Year 
for Action, Bilingual Collegiate Program and several other programs 
on the UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston campuses. If the outcome of the 
vote should result in a runoff between the bargaining units in- 
volved, the runoff would be held within 60 to 90 days after the 
original election. He said that every effort must be made to 
ensure that the greatest number of people exercise their right to 
vote since the collective bargaining law simply requires a major- 
ity of those voting to determine the result. Therefore, if only 
a few vote, the decision could be made on the results of those 
few votes. He said that it is also important that the voters knojvr 
exactly what they are voting for; that is, what a vote for each 
option will deliver. 

Trustee Troy asked whether a small vote at UM/Amherst 
counteracted by a large vote at UM/Boston would commit UM/Amherst 
to the result at UM/Boston. Chancellor Bromery replied that sine 
only one unit was involved, this would, in fact, be the case. 

Chancellor Golino said he, too, was concerned that voters 
were adequately informed as to what the realities of their votes 
would mean. Referring to Secretary Parks' remarks at the Execu- 
tive Committee he said it was important for those voting not to 
have expectations about monetary gains greater than the State 
could produce since, as the Secretary said, the available funding 
for compensation increases is limited. 

Chairman Healey then moved the vote, reading the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee to the Board, which reaffirmed 
the long-standing position of the Board that effective governance 
arrangements to maintain the traditional relationship between 
faculty, administration, and Trustees, is preferable to collective 
bargaining. Mrs. Bluestone asked if legal counsel had been sough,1 
as to the advisability of such a statement at a time when a col- 
lective bargaining unit had been determined and an election sched- 
uled. 

At the request of Chairman Healey, Mr. O'Leary, Associate 
Counsel to the University, replied that labor counsel retained 
by the University had been consulted about this proposed vote. 
He had advised that the Board can state its position with regard 
to governance. Neither Secretary Hardy's memorandum nor the pro- 
posed vote, said Counsel O'Leary, contains a threat of reprisal 
and there is no coercion. Such a vote would not be regarded as 
an unfair labor practice. 



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4195 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Burack stated her belief that it was extremely 
important that the Board receive a very complete briefing on the 
relationship between the 1973 governance statement and the 1974 
Mendonca bill before taking such action. She said it was her opir 
ion that such a statement would be unwise and she would, therefor 
vote against it. Trustee Cronin stated his concern that there was 
only two days' notice of action of such importance. He stated his 
doubt as to the familiarity of all Trustees with the fine points 
of the governance document. He said he was surprised that there 
was no mention of the students in the proposed vote, since student 
were affected by any change in the governance structure, and that 
he could not vote for the motion, as the students at UM/ Amherst 
did not have confidence in the governance procedure. 

Trustee Breyer said that the proposed motion did not 
underwrite every "jot and tittle" of the governance document. But 
the issue on campus is whether there should be a vote for the union. 
In that context, he said he supported the existing system. If he 
were convinced that a vote for the union would bring higher sala- 
ries he might, he said, vote "no" on this motion; but he had seri- 
ous doubts that this was the case and, in fact, he felt a union 
might have the reverse effect. He said that where uncertainty 
exists, he would favor the present system, though it may be imper- 
fect. Chairman Healey said the purpose of the motion was to au- 
thorize the administration to express to the faculty the position 
of the Board. 

Trustee Burack reiterated her belief that it would be a 
mistake to take a stand without knowing whether the governance 
document coincides with the Mendonca law. She said she felt the 
action was both premature and inadvisable and did not understand 
why the Board had not had an opportunity to meet with the lawyers 
She asked who had chosen the lawyers, which she felt was a Board 
decision to make. She said that any action taken by a negotiator 
was a commitment to a policy change and only the Board had the 
right to change policy. She was, she said, absolutely appalled 
that the Board would propose such an action before the election 
when there was no urgency. 

Chairman Healey said he differed with Trustee Burack 
philosophically on this matter and that the motion was a means of 
authorizing the Chancellor to take a stand before the election. 
It was not in any way changing the current governance process. He 
said that he did not feel the Chancellor could take a position 
without this type of direction from the Board. 

Professor Sulzner stated his concern that the proposed 
motion would be taken by some faculty as an adversary position 
adopted by the Board, even though it might not be so intended. He 
said that at the Executive Committee the representatives from both 
the UM/Boston and UM/ Amherst faculties had argued for the legitimacy 
of collective bargaining as an alternative point of view with re- 



Board 
11/3/76 



4196 



Board 
11/3/76 



UM/Worcester— 
Governance of 
the Medical 
School (Doc. 
T77-028A) 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

spect to the effectiveness of the University governance. 

Trustee McNeil asked for clarification of her understand 
ing that the motion simply meant that even though there were prob- 
lems with the governance document, the Board leaned toward that 
process rather than collective bargaining. Chairman Healey said 
that was indeed the case. 

Mrs. Bluestone asked if the 1973 governance document had 
not been revoked why it was necessary to reaffirm it. Chairman 
Healey replied that membership on the Board had changed since the 
governance document was adopted and it seemed only fair to allow 
new Trustees to be heard on the issue. He then asked for the vote 
on the motion before the Board and it was seconded and 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees continue to endorse as 
effective governance arrangements the existing 
organization and processes of the University so as 
to maintain the traditional relationship between 
faculty, administration, and the Board of Trustees. 

Trustees Abrams, Burack, Conti, Cronin and Mrs. Blue- 
stone, voting for Trustee Fielding, were recorded in opposition 
to the motion. 

Chairman Healey asked Chancellor Bulger to introduce the 
next agenda item, Governance of the Medical School — UM/Worcester 
(Doc. T77-028A) . Chancellor Bulger said that Professor Goodman 
had chaired the group who drafted this document. He said the cam- 
pus is relatively happy with the document, while recognizing that 
some parts may have to be revised. The document, he said, would 
be reviewed in two years. There being no questions, on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the Governance Document for 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School as 
set forth in Trustee Document T77-028A. 



President Wood asked to be 
granted his request and President Woo 
Secretary Parks had to leave the meet 
of capital outlay for the Boston camp 
October meeting and again at the meet 
ings and Grounds earlier in the day, 
it only fair that the Secretary have 
report of the Committee on Buildings 
It was therefore agreed that this rep 
Secretary Parks left the meeting. 



recognized. Chairman Healey 
d informed the Board that 
ing early. Since the matter 
us had been discussed at the 
ing of the Committee on Builc 
President Wood said he felt 
an opportunity to hear the 
and Grounds on this subject, 
ort would be taken up before 



Chairman Healey then called upon Trustee Spiller, who 
reported that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds had met 
earlier in the day, at which time the FY 1977 capital outlay had 



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1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been discussed. The money appropriated by the Legislature for th£ 
University, he said, was as follows: 



UM/ Amherst 



Renovations to Goodell Building 
Utility renovations 
Campus safety improvements 



$2,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,020,000 



UM/Boston 



Modifications to seawater cooling 

system 
Study and design of seawater cooling 

system 
Modifications to Building 010 

ventilating system 



$ 225,000 
200,000 
300,000 



UM/Worcester 



Furnishings and equipment, University 

Hospital 
Site work 



1 



Field Stations 



Waltham - Boiler replacement 



$2,000,000 
1,100,000 



$ 110,000 



ty 



I 



Trustee Spiller turned next to the FY 1978 Capital Out- 
lay Request, which he said had been in the initial amount of 
$12.4 million. He pointed out that $3.5 million of the total 
request was caused by factors beyond the control of the Universi 
such as corrections to the seawater cooling system at UM/Boston 
and problems with the Tillson Power Plant at UM/Amherst. Contrac 
problems at the time of construction were responsible for what 
amounted to 25 percent of the capital outlay request for correc- 
tive measures, he said, and the University has been trying for 
two years to get the Bureau of Building Construction to correct 
these problems. 

Each item of the FY 1978 capital outlay request was dis 
cussed by the Committee, but it was decided to defer final approv 
al until sometime in November after a review of the five-year 
plans of each campus could be completed, at which time, he said, 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee would meet jointly with the 
Committee on Budget and Finance to discuss this matter further 
with the aim of keeping the request as low as possible. 

The Committee next went on an inspection tour of vari- 
ous facilities at UM/Amherst, after which it was voted to recom- 
mend approval of the facilities subject to the conditions set 
forth. 



4197 



Board 
11/3/76 



FY 1978 Capital 
Outlay Request 



UM/Amherst— 

Building 

Acceptances 



4198 



Board 
11/3/76 



UM/ Amherst — 
Tillson Power 
Plant 



UM/Boston — 
Gymnasium 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the Addition to the Infirmary at the 
Amherst Campus as completed in accordance with 
plans and specifications. 

VOTED : To accept the Bus Storage Facility at the Amherst 
Campus as completed in accordance with plans and 
specifications . 

VOTED ; To accept the Fine Arts Center at the Amherst 
Campus, as completed in accordance with plans 
and specifications subject, however, to the 
completion and/or correction of items on a list 
dated March 11, 1976 and on file with the Director 
of Physical Plant, Amherst Campus; further, that 
the foregoing acceptance shall not constitute 
acceptance of the lighting system and the sound 
system for said Fine Arts Center. 

VOTED : To accept the Graduate Research Center II at the 
Amherst Campus, as completed in accordance with 
the plans and specifications subject, however, to 
the completion and/or correction of items on a list 
dated September 16, 1976 and on file with the Direc- 
tor of Physical Plant, Amherst Campus. 

Trustee Spiller said that in addition to the above 
buildings the Committee also visited the Tillson Power Plant. 
Although the building is operational, the power line to it is 
not. Again, he said, he felt the Trustees should take stronger 
measures to ensure that the Bureau of Building Construction acted 
to correct this problem. 

Trustee Spiller reported that the Committee had also 
discussed the situation at UM/Boston, and he then asked Trustee 
Clark to express her concerns. Trustee Clark said she was pleased 
that Secretary Parks could remain at the meeting, because she 
would not want to make her statement without providing him the 
opportunity to respond. She then read her statement which said 
that as a Trustee and as a resident of the Dorchester community, 
she wished to bring to the Board's attention a very disturbing 
situation with regard to the gymnasium for the Harbor Campus. 

She reminded the Board of the many reviews this building 
has received from this Board in developing the plans, in revising 
these plans to a much lower budget and in conducting the Environ- 
mental Impact Review. These reviews have included the Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs, and the Office of Transportation 
and Construction, she said. 

Trustee Clark recalled that Trustee Spiller spoke at 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the last Board meeting about the apparent "shell game" between the 
BBC, Secretary Parks' Office, and the Executive Office of Admin- 
istration and Finance regarding where the bidding process was 
stalled. As late as last Friday, she said, Chancellor Golino re- 
ceived a letter from Secretary Parks dated October 25, 1976 stat- 
ing that he was only then reviewing release of the capital outlay 
appropriation for the Harbor Campus physical education complex. 
Trustee Clark read an excerpt from the letter which stated that 
the Governor's Management Task Force report recommended against 
the facility, because "the need for such a f acility . . . is unclear. 
The Secretary's letter went on to say, "The fact of that judgment, 
set within the general context of the need of the Commonwealth to 
reduce its capital indebtedness, must be given significant weight. 

"Given the academic and community roles of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston as an urban commuter institution, 
community access to, and actual use of, university facilities is 
a central element in the definition of need. It would be helpful 
to me if you could provide me with the following information on 
policy and practices relative to existing and planned facilities 
Trustee Clark said there followed a list of questions. 

She then read a portion of Chancellor Golino ' s reply. 

"I do not understand your reference to 'reviewing releasle 
of the capital outlay appropriation' for the gymnasium. My under- 
standing according to advice from University General Counsel is 
that funds voted by the Legislature may not be impounded. Nor am 
I clear as to your reference to the Management Task Force. I be- 
lieve the University position in regards to that body was made 
clear by President Wood (letter of August 6, 1976 to Secretary 
Parks, page 4) when he stated: 'The Task Force again went beyond 
its province in recommending the cancellation of plans for a gym 
at Boston since this would be a reversal of action already taken 
by the Legislature. 

"Furthermore, I must say in all candor that I am perplexed 
by your request, at this time, for information which has been sub- 
mitted long ago and in compliance with all procedures. Our recordls 
indicate that the preliminary project synopsis was forwarded from 
Administration and Finance to Secretary Parks on August 5, 1975. 
At that time or subsequently we have not received any request for 
any information from your office until the letter of October 25, 
1976." 

Trustee Clark then said she wished to put the following 
resolution forward: 



4199 



Board 
11/3/76 



RESOLVED: 



That the President be directed to take all 
necessary administrative and legal steps to 
expedite the construction of the gymnasium 
building at the Harbor Campus, including the 



4200 



Board 
11/3/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

release of the bidding documents pertaining 
thereto . 

Since the Secretary has raised the question of community 
use, she wanted him to understand clearly that the University is 
committed to substantial increase of community use of this facilitjy 
As an active participant in the community, she said she knows the 
community intends to hold the University to that commitment and 
the University intends to fulfill that commitment. Finally she 
said that the Secretary, as an engineer, must understand the effecjl 
of further delay on the cost of a building that is already on a 
very tight budget. 



Secretary Parks responded that he had talked with Mr. 
Janis and they had agreed to a process to resolve this problem. 
His letter had been a part of that process. He said he was meet- 
ing later in the week with the Governor, Secretary Buckley, David 
Liederman and a representative of the Development Cabinet to dis- 
cuss the matter. President Wood asked Secretary Parks if he had 
come to a decision in his own mind yet, to which Secretary Parks 
replied that he had not yet seen Chancellor Golino ' s reply to his 
letter. Trustee Clark asked how soon the Secretary's reply could 
be expected. Secretary Parks replied as soon as his meeting with 
the Governor has occurred. 



Trustee McNeil inquired whether the gymnasium was a part 
of the budget which had already been approved. President Wood 
said the money for the gymnasium was appropriated two years ago. 
At that time then Secretary of Education Cronin had requested that 
the gymnasium be redesigned with specific attention to community 
aspects. He said the requested redesign had been completed follow- 
ed by further redesign due to cost which became necessary because 
of cost escalation with the passage of time. He said there is no 
question of money; the money has been appropriated. It is a matted 
of obtaining approval to put the project out for bid. Vice Pres- 
ident Robinson said that any further delay would make it that much 
more difficult to get the facilities desired within the appropria- 
tion. The bid documents have been ready for four weeks and the 
cost escalation is approximately $65,000 per month. Secretary 
Parks said the legal question is whether or not the Governor has 
the right to impound the money. Administratively, he said, it is 
a matter of priorities. President Wood said the issue is whether 
or not priorities are set at the time the Legislature acts and 
where the ultimate responsibility lies. Secretary Parks, having 
delayed his departure, left at this point in the meeting. There 
being no further discussion, the motion was seconded and it was 

RESOLVED : That the President be directed to take all 
necessary administrative and legal steps to 
expedite the construction of the gymnasium 
building at the Harbor Campus, including the 
release of the bidding documents pertaining 
thereto. 



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4201 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Abrams returned to the matter of the Tillson 
Power Plant, asking who was paying for the cost of the plant. 
Trustee Spiller replied that it is the responsibility of the 
Bureau of Building Construction until such time as the University 
accepts the building. Trustee Spiller added that the problem lie$ 
in determining who is at fault. Chancellor Bromery added that to<p 
long a delay in resolving the matter will impact on the campus 
since the old power plant is still in use, but its life is limite<jl 

Chairman Healey then turned to the final item on the 
Executive Committee agenda, the matter of a general delegation of 
authority for the execution of interagency agreements at UM/Wor- 
cester. There being no objection to this proposed delegation, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept and approve the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee that the Chancellor/Dean of 
the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, 
in consultation with the Office of the President, 
be authorized to negotiate and execute contracts 
developed in accordance with the provisions of the 
January 8, 1976 Interagency Agreement (T76-031C) or 
as said Agreement may be amended by consent of all 
parties thereto. 

At the request of Chairman Healey, Secretary Hardy re- 
ported for the Health Affairs Committee in the absence of Trustee 
Robertson. The Committee, she said, had met on October 19. Chan- 
cellor Bulger had informed the Committee that the searches for an 
Affirmative Action Officer and the Chairman of the Department of 
Psychiatry were nearing completion. He also reported on the open 
ing of the Child Development Center, operated in concert with the 
Department of Public Health and aimed at early identification of 
high-risk developmental cases. In addition to treating children, 
the Center trains staff who work with children. 

The Committee then discussed the Governance Document of 
the Medical School, recommending approval of the document to the 
Executive Committee, which document had been approved by the Board 
earlier in the meeting. 

The Committee also discussed the Group Practice Plan fo:: 
the purpose of familiarizing the Committee with its rules and reg- 
ulations. The Trustee action of June 25, 1975 mandated review of 
the regulations in the spring of 1977 and the Committee at that 
time will be asked to consider amendments to the Group Practice 
Plan. 

Secretary Hardy added that had Trustee Robertson been 
present he would also have reported on the meeting of the Hospita 
Management Board and she asked Chairman Healey to recognize Chan- 
cellor Bulger to make this report. Chancellor Bulger reported 
that on October 20 the HMB had held its second meeting. Two majo:: 



Board 
11/3/76 



UM/ Worcester- 
Delegation of 
Authority 



Report of 
Committee on 
Health Affairs 



4202 



Board 
11/3/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

issues were addressed: the first related to the state job classi- 
fication for intensive care nurses. Nurses' salaries at the Uni- 
versity Hospital, he said, were inadequate to be competitive with 
other Worcester hospitals and with comparable Boston hospitals. 
The HMB had, therefore, voted to recommend "that the University 
support the equalization of nurses' salaries and take the necessary 
steps to insure that the salary levels for nurses serving at the 
University Hospital be competitive with the salaries of nurses 
serving in comparable positions throughout the Commonwealth, and 
that such steps be acted upon as expeditiously as possible." 

The second issue he said, related to the need for the 
University Teaching Hospital to petition the State Rate Setting 
Commission for an increase in allowable hospital charges. The 
current charges are significantly less than actual cost for pro- 
viding services to patients. Since 95 percent of the patients are 
covered by insurance and other third party payers, an increase of' 
charges would reduce the amount of subsidy necessary from the state. 
Because of the Trustee approved credit and collection policy estab- 
lished in 1975, the 5 percent of patients without third party cov- 
erage would not bear the burden of the increases. Increases in 
daily charges of $30 for a semi-private room, $35 for a private 
room and $125 for intensive care were recommended. The HMB voted 
"to support and recommend to the University, and to such other 
agencies as are appropriate, the increase in Hospital rate charges 
necessary to insure adequate financial stability for the University 
Teaching Hospital." 



Chancellor Bulger said that the HMB also heard a presen- 
tation of the organizational structure of the hospital and a de- 
scription of the clinical and medical division. 



Chairman Healey then asked for the report of the Delegate 
to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Troy reported that on 
October 18 the Board of Higher Education met with Governor Dukakis 
and Secretary Parks at the BHE Chairman's request to discuss some 
of the urgent matters, mainly monetary, facing the Board. He said 
that due to lack of funding for key staff positions, the BHE was 
unable to fulfill its mandated functions. The Governor had listen- 
ed sympathetically, but had said that overall budget demands still 
exceeded revenues of the Commonwealth, that the state pension sys4- 
tem must be put on a sound financial basis, that there is a con- 
tinuing need for economy in all segments of higher education and 
that a tax increase was out of the question. 

The Governor then asked the BHE, he said, to take a hard 
look at the various budget proposals of the segments in the months 
ahead. Normally, said Trustee Troy, the BHE would have reviewed 
the segmental budgets by November, but the position of Deputy 
Chancellor for Budget and Finance had been vacant since April and 
was only filled very recently; therefore, the Board would not be 
able to make its review until late December or early January. The 
Governor, continued Trustee Troy, also asked the BHE to submit its 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposal for additional funds in a brief memorandum to him, prom- 
ising to give it careful consideration. 

Chairman Healey next asked Trustee Troy to report on the 
meeting of representatives of the Five College Consortium at 
Amherst on October 26, which he and Trustee Breyer attended. Trus 
tee Troy said the meeting was attended by trustees from each insti- 
tution as well as by Chancellor Bromery and the Presidents of the 
colleges. President Wood's schedule, he said, had prevented him 
from attending. He reported that the cooperation among these in- 
stitutions has been very successful, especially the Hampshire Intejr 
Library Center. Students were able to take courses at other col- 
leges, faculty to teach courses in the various colleges, coopera- 
tive use of the libraries was possible, bus service was available 
between institutions, symposia are held, and The Massachusetts 
Review is supported by all of the five colleges. He said the con- 
sortium enriches the educational life of the individual instituticns 
and also makes it possible to attract better faculty. It is a goc d 
example of public-private cooperation. Trustee Breyer added that 
he, too, had been impressed with the work being done by the con- 
sortium. Trustee Burack said she would like to see more publicity 
given to this kind of cooperation. Chancellor Bromery mentioned 
that the dedication ceremonies of the Five-College Radio Astronomy 
Observatory had received national notice. 

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourrted 
at 3:30 p.m. 



4203 



Board 
11/3/76 



UEladydl Keith Hardy • 



Jladydl Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4204 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



NOT USED 



r 



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ATTENDANCE: 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

December 1, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 

Chancellor's Conference Room 

Administration Building 

Harbor Campus 

University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Abrams, Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Croce, 
Cronin, Dennis, Dukakis, Eddy, Gordon, McNeil, Rowland, Shaler, 
Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mr. Colby rep- 
resenting Trustee Winthrop; Mrs. Kaplan representing Trustee 
Okin; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, Assistant 
to the Secretary; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary, recorder 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Morgenthau and Robertson 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President and Director of the Institute 
for Labor Affairs; Mr. Cooley, Associate Vice President for Ana- 
lytical Studies; Mr. Eller , Associate Vice President for Univer- 
sity Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Vice President and Budget 
Director; Mr. O'Leary, Associate Counsel to the University; Mr. 
Prussing, Deputy Budget Director; Mrs. Simmons, Assistant Vice 
President for Academic Affairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant to the Budg- 
et Director; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor] 
for Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Melley, Di- 
rector of Public Information; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 



UM/Boston: 



Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative; Professor Schwartz, Alternate Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 



Health Affairs; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Mr. Ference, Group Practice Administrator; Mr. Smith, 
Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, 
Faculty Representative 

Guests: Mr. Arthur Menard, Labor Counsel; Mr. Parks, Secretary 



of Educational Affairs; Ms. Horowitz, Board of Higher Education 

The meeting was called to order at 1:35 p.m. Chairman 
Healey first welcomed Governor Dukakis. He then called for ap- 



4205 



Approval of 
Minutes 



4206 



Board 
12/1/76 



President's 
Remarks 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/ Bo st on — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proval of the minutes of the previous meeting, and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the minutes of the November 3, 1976 
meeting. 

Chairman Healey then called upon President Wood for com- 
ment. President Wood said he wished to join the Chairman in wel- 
coming the Governor. He said that the environmental impact study 
for the John F. Kennedy Library had been received, that planning 
for the State Archives building was proceeding and efforts regard- 
ing the proposed home for the Opera Company are continuing. He 
remarked on the good fortune of obtaining the leadership of Mr. 
Ephron Catlin for the working group of business and financial 
leaders who are concerned with the potential for private as well 
as public, development in the area. 

At the conclusion of his remarks, President Wood called 
upon Chancellor Br ornery. Chancellor Bromery said he was happy 
that the Board would be acting at this meeting on the appointment 
of a new Dean for the School of Education at UM/Amherst and he 
said that the campus had full confidence that under the leadership 
of the new Dean the School would be administratively, fiscally 
and educationally sound. 

President Wood next called on Chancellor Golino. Chan- 
cellor Golino called attention to the report on UM/Boston which 
had been distributed to the Trustees with their Board folders. 
He added that after Trustees had had an opportunity to read the 
report, he hoped there would be opportunity to discuss it. He 
said that fifteen months had elapsed since the Trustees had set 
priorities for the Boston campus, and the report contained a com- 
prehensive report of developments at UM/Boston as they relate to 
those priorities. He reviewed the contents of the report, which 
included information on the unification of the College of Liberal 
Arts, the work of the College of Public and Community Service in 
providing innovative programs for a new type of student, ways in 
which the College of Professional Studies is providing diversifi- 
cation to meet career needs of students, changes in approaches to 
Student Support Services, the mounting of an Extended-Day Program 
and progress toward the development of selected graduate programs, 
as well as ways in which the campus is providing service to the 
community. He said a separate report on Student Support Services 
would be forthcoming. In conclusion he stated his feeling that, 
in spite of many problems, the campus had made great progress in 
its first ten years of existence. 

At President Wood's request, Chancellor Bulger reported 
on activities at UM/Worcester , stressing the progress being made 
in the delivery of health services under the interagency agree- 
ments between the University and the Executive Office of Human 
Services. He mentioned particularly the joint recruitment of 



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42^7 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

primary care physicians, specialty backup and continuing educa- 
tion at Belchertown and Monson State Hospitals. He commended 
Dr. Caper, recently appointed Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, 
for his efforts in this area. Chancellor Bulger said that the 
interface between the educational experience of the students and 
residents and the opportunity to serve previously unserved seg- 
ments of the population was proving to be beneficial to both the 
students and the patients and that he believed it to be one of 
the most creative arrangements established between a state and a 
medical school. He said he sees opportunities for other similar 
mutually beneficial arrangements. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the Report of the Exec- 
utive Committee, asking President Wood to introduce the first 
item of agenda, the Cost of Living Adjustments for University Em- 
ployees (Doc. T77-043) . President Wood said that during the last 
two years, the financial status of the Commonwealth and the pro- 
hibition of merit increases had caused a hardship on University 
employees. However, University policy has been to follow the 
general compensation policies of the state as a whole and in keep- 
ing with the recent agreement negotiated between the Commonwealth 
and the Alliance, he said, he was asking for authority from the 
Board to make compensation adjustments. 



Chairman Healey emphasized that the proposed vote simply 
requested authority to make adjustments and did not in any way 
constitute a promise, express or implied, to any person who might 
be voting in the collective bargaining elections taking place on 
the campuses. He added that the matter had been thoroughly dis- 
cussed at the preceding Executive Committee meeting and that al- 
though the Board did not usually meet in January, if the collective 
bargaining agreements are in readiness for ratification as is 
required by the proposed vote, the Board could be called to meet 
as necessary. 



Board 
12/1/76 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Cost of Living 
Adjustments 
(Doc. T77-043) 



There being no questions, on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : In accordance with Trustee Document T77-043 and 

past University policy and practice, the President 
of the University is authorized to take appropriate 
steps to complete collective bargaining agreements 
with unions representing classified staff at a cost 
comparable to but not exceeding the cost of the 
Commonwealth's agreement with the Alliance; further, 
that the President be authorized to take appropriate 
steps to provide compensation adjustments for all 
other eligible University faculty and staff at a 
cost comparable to but not exceeding said Alliance 
agreement, provided that no action may be taken 
which is inconsistent with the collective bargaining 
law or any other laws of the Commonwealth, and such 



-3- 



4208 



Board 
12/1/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Amendment to 
Faculty Senate 
Constitution 
(Doc. T73-196, 
T77-051) 



Honorary- 
Degrees 



Report of 
Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

action shall be subject to ratification by the 
Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Healey asked Chancellor Bromery to introduce 
the second agenda item, the Amendment to Faculty Senate Constitu- 
tion — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-051) . Chancellor Bromery said that 



this was an amendment simply to make possible associate repre- 
sentatives to the Board rather than one alternate representative, 
for the purpose of lightening the burden on the Faculty Repre- 
sentative in attending meetings of the seven committees as well 
as the full Board. Professor Sulzner , the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate Representative, said this amendment had his support since 
it would give him more time for his primary responsibilities, 
teaching and research. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following amendment to the Faculty 
Senate Constitution which amendment was adopted 
by the Faculty Senate on October 7, 1976 and rati- 
fied by the general faculty: 

"That Section 7 (d) of the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate Constitution be amended by replacing 
the term 'an Alternate Delegate' with the 
term 'Associate Delegates' so that the entire 
section shall read as follows: 

"(d) the Senate shall choose a Secretary, 
a Presiding Officer, a Delegate and 
Associate Delegates to the Board of 
Trustees." 

Chairman Healey said the last item of agenda was the 
matter of Honorary Degrees. He said that at an executive session 
of the Executive Committee, at which a majority of the Board mem- 
bers were present, a name was recommended for addition to the 
list of recipients of honorary degrees to be awarded at the 1977 
UM/Amherst Commencement. He said the Secretary would circulate 
this name to those members of the Board who were not present at 
the Executive Committee meeting. Chairman Healey read the vote 
as approved by the Trustees at the executive session: 

VOTED : To approve as an additional candidate for an 

Honorary Degree to be awarded at the UM/Amherst 
1977 Commencement the person agreed upon in 
executive session of the Executive Committee of 
this date. 

Chairman Healey called next for the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Budget and Finance. Trustee Carlson reported that the 
Committee had met the previous day, at which time they had taken 
action on several items and had heard several reports. Among the 
latter, he said, were a report from Standish, Ayer & Wood, invest- 



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UNSVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

merit counsel, and a report from the UM/Worcester Chancellor and 
his associates on the revenues and expenditures of the Group Prac- 
tice Plan. The Group Practice report, he said, had been mailed 
to the Trustees prior to the Board meeting. President Wood, he 
said, had then reported on the status of the FY 1978 Maintenance 
Budget Request, which may require further review pending the out- 
come of the collective bargaining negotiations now in progress 
since it did not provide for increases in compensation. 

The first item requiring Board action, he said, was the 
matter of the University Teaching Hospital Rate Increases — UM/ 
Worcester (Doc. T77-037) . UM/Worcester had requested approval to 
seek rate increases to become effective January 1, he said, and 
Trustee Croce would report further on this item, which had also 
been discussed by the Committee on Health Affairs. The increases, 
he added, had received the unanimous approval of the Committee on 
Budget and Finance. 

Trustee Carlson then reported on the recommendation for 
the establishment of the W. Roy Elliot Endowment Fund (Doc. T77- 
035). Treasurer Johnson, he said, had explained to the Committee 
the need for this fund. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 
then 

VOTED : That the W. Roy Elliot Memorial Fund be established 
as an Endowment Fund for the purpose of making an 
annual award of $300.00 from income earned during 
the preceding fiscal year to a Massachusetts resident 
registered in the Forestry Department as a full-time 
student at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst 
Campus; to be eligible a student must be in good 
academic standing, demonstrate financial need and 
be of good character. The recipient shall be select- 
ed by a committee consisting of faculty from the 
Forestry Department who will review applications 
filed prior to June 1 each year. Excess income re- 
maining after annual awards have been made shall be 
returned to the principal of the fund on the last 
day of the fiscal year. 

Trustee Carlson said that Treasurer Johnson had recom- 
mended the Listing of the Ohio Land for Sale (Doc. T77-045) . He 
said that after discussion, the Committee had approved his recom- 
mendation. Chairman Healey inquired whether the land had been 
appraised and Treasurer Johnson replied that the firm which would 
list the land had appraised it in 1975, at $1,015,000. 

Trustee Gordon added that the Committee had gone into 
the matter in depth. On motion made and seconded, it was then 



•5- 



Board 
12/1/76 



UM/Worcester — 
University 
Teaching 
Hospital Rate 
Increases 
(Doc. T77-037) 



W. Roy Elliot 
Endowment Fund 
(Doc. T77-035) 



Listing of 
Ohio Land 
for Sale 
(Doc. T77-045) 



^210 



Board 
12/1/76 



State Auditor' 
Reports 



Report of 
Committee 
on Buildings 
and Grounds 

Five-year 

Capital 

Outlay 

Request 

(Doc. T77-048) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
enter into a listing agreement with the firm of 
Donald G. Culp , Realtor, of Columbus, Ohio, to 
offer for sale the property described in Trustee 
Document T77-045; provided, however, that the 
terms of any sale agreement shall be subject to 
approval by the Treasurer, the President and the 
Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Carlson reported that the Committee had then 
heard a summary by Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management and 
Business Affairs, of the State Auditor's Reports. He said the 
Auditor had not questioned any major items and that replies from 
the campuses to the questions asked would be forthcoming by the 
January 10 deadline. 

The Committee on Budget and Finance, said Trustee Carl- 
son, was then joined by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
to hear, discuss and act upon the five-year capital outlay request 
The Committee on Budget and Finance, he said, concurred in the 
action which the Committee on Buildings and Grounds would recom- 
mend later in the meeting. 

Chairman Healey called next on Trustee Spiller to report 
on the meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Trus- 
tee Spiller said that the Committee had considered a Five-year 
Capital Outlay Request (Doc. T77-048) with a firm request for FY 



I 



I 



1978. Each year the request would be reviewed before the final 
submission for that particular year would be made, he said. He 
then summarized the steps which had occurred leading up to action 
by the Board at this time. He said the process began with submis- 
sions from the campuses to the President, reviews by the Presi- 
dent's Office, hearings held by the President on the five-year 
plans on each campus, resulting in a reassessment of needs, and 
then submission to the Committees on Budget and Finance and Build- 
ings and Grounds. The original request for all campuses totalled 
$114 million, and as a result of the reviews, it had been reduced 
to $70 million. Because of the magnitude of the request, Trustee 
Spiller said, he would report the items individually by campus. 
He began with the UM/Amherst submission, reviewing each item of 
the five-year plan which covered the following major categories: 
utility renovations; renovations and remodeling of older academic 
buildings; renovations and remodeling of state-owned residence 
halls; landscape improvements; campus safety improvements; and 
equipment replacement. The total requested for the Amherst Campus 
for the five-year period amounted to $25.03 million, of which 
$5.5 million was requested for FY 1978. 

Trustee Spiller then asked if any members of the Commit- 1 
tee on Buildings and Grounds would like to comment. Trustee 
Burack said the fact that so little renovation of older buildings 
had been done in sixteen years was extraordinary and she felt 



■6- 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that it would be "playing a losing game" if something were not 
done to maintain an institution that was paying such dividends to 
the Commonwealth. Governor Dukakis asked if the University had 
explored the possibility of obtaining the new federal public works 
money for these projects. Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning, said that federal public works funds had been requested for 
some of the site work at UM/Worcester , but the state government 
had decided to submit other projects. Governor Dukakis emphasized 
that federal sources should be explored for future projects of 
this kind since state capital outlay funds would be limited. Trus 
tee Clark remarked that a considerable portion of the capital out- 
lay request was the result of lack of performance by the Bureau 
of Building Construction. Professor Sulzner commented that the 
University should take advantage of its own expertise in such 
matters as landscape, engineering and environmental design. Trus- 
tee Spiller said that this was being done. Students in the UM/ 
Amherst Landscape Design Department had been enlisted to help with 
planning the landscape at UM/Worcester . 

Trustee Spiller reported next on capital outlay require- 
ments for UM/Boston, again reviewing each item of the five-year 
plan: the sea water system; space adaptation; the bus terminal; 
equipment replacement; renovations at 100 Arlington Street; con- 
struction of the Arts and Science Building; and preparation of 
athletic fields. The total five-year request for UM/Boston a- 
mounted to $33.5 million, of which $29 million was requested for 
the construction of one major building. 

Trustee Spiller then reviewed the UM/Worcester five- 
year $12 million plan and the $3.9 million FY 1978 request for 
the following categories: teaching hospital furnishings and 
equipment; medical school furnishings for clinical and basic 
sciences faculty and audio-visual equipment; a computer system; 
furnishings and equipment for three family health centers; and 
site completion funds. 

Completing his detailed report of each of the campus' 
five-year plans and FY 1978 capital outlay requests, Trustee 
Spiller then moved the vote. Secretary Parks asked for clarifi- 
cation of the purpose of the proposed $29 million Arts and Science 
Building for the Boston Campus, if this building contemplated a 
2,000 student enrollment growth, if this growth had been approved 
and if the building was in anticipation of the transfer of the 
downtown student population to the Harbor Campus. President Wood, 
responding to Secretary Parks, explained that the original plan 
for the campus had entailed a plant of from $335 to $355 million 
and had contemplated up to six college buildings to serve from 15 
to 20 thousand students. Since that time the enrollment limits 
had been cut back to from 10 to 12.5 thousand. The proposed Arts 
and Science Building was a scaled-down model of what had original!, 
been two separate buildings — one for the Arts and one for the 
Sciences. This building, he said, would not necessarily result 



-7- 



4211 



Board 
12/1/76 



4212 



Board 
12/1/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in changing the downtown center, which now houses the College of 
Public and Community Service. It is required to provide a full 
range of instructional facilities for both present and future en- 
rollment. Chancellor Golino added that the campus is already 
overcrowded to the point where the Library is being used for class 
room space. 

Secretary Parks asked if the services now lacking at the 
Boston campus could not be provided by arrangements with other in- 
stitutions, similar to the contractual program with Northeastern, 
possibly using facilities at the Massachusetts College of Art. 
Chancellor Golino responded that where feasible such arrangements 
would be made, but that they could not satisfy the needs of all 
the programs or students, particularly given the difficult student 
schedules combining work with study. Vice President Robinson 
added that the Arts and Science Building had been given priority 
over the building of the third college building because of the 
necessity for the existing student body to have adequate facili- 
ties for strengthened program activities in both the arts and 
sciences. She also noted the difficulty in commuting between fa- 
cilities such as the Massachusetts College of Art, which is in 
Charlestown, and the Harbor Campus. Trustee Cronin also empha- 
sized the psychological importance to students of having a physi- 
cal campus . 

Trustee Rowland stated that the Board had expressed its 
concern and priority for the Arts in its establishment of the 
Advisory Council for the Fine Arts and in the receipt of the Coun- 
cil's report last fall, and she added that if the interest in 
these activities is as great as studies have indicated, UM/Boston 
students could not be accommodated at the Massachusetts College of 
Art. She said that although she believed the University should 
take advantage of the resources at hand, she felt strongly that 
it was essential for faculty and equipment for the arts to be pro- 
vided on campus. 

Mrs. Kaplan raised the issue of declining enrollments 
in high schools, and asked if this would affect institutions of 
higher education in the near future. Chancellor Golino replied 
that the campus was aware of these statistics, but that although 
fewer high school students might be graduating and going on to 
higher education, the reduction in these numbers would be offset 
by increasing numbers of nontraditional students attracted by UM/ 
Boston. He added that there was no space on campus strictly for 
student use, such as a student union, nor is there enough space 
for student support services such as counseling and advising. 
Trustee Breyer asked if the expenditure of the $29 million would 
help to accommodate additional enrollment, and if the added stu- 
dent enrollment would then make the cost per student smaller. 
Mrs. Robinson replied that the construction of the building would 
allow the campus to round out the necessary academic programs and 
that the student per capita cost — particularly space and mainte- 
nance costs — would decrease with additional enrollment. 



-8- 



■ 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Shaler emphasized that the building would allow 
the filling of a present void on the campus in education in the 
arts, and Trustee McNeil mentioned the trend whereby a growing 
number of working people are seeking to continue their education 
in order to enhance their career opportunities. She said she 
supported the proposed expansion at UM/Boston to ensure opportuni- 
ty for those older, nontraditional students. She said the issue 
of adding the Arts and Science Building was a matter of enhancing 
the quality of education offered by the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston. 

Replying to a query from Trustee Abrams , Chancellor 
Golino said that in the College of Professional Studies only 200 
students were accepted from a total of 1200 applicants, most of 
whom were qualified students electing a field for which there is 
a great demand. President Wood noted the scale of investment in 
construction since 1970 and said that the five-year plan recom- 
mended seemed prudent and reasonable considering annualization 
and depreciation. He said he was grateful to the Trustee commit- 
tees and to this Administration of the Commonwealth for putting 
the University on a reasonable cycle for capital outlay. Trustee 
Burack added that although the total amount required was substan- 
tial, it would be expended over a period of years, not all at 
once. 

Secretary Parks said he was aware of the problems, but 
because of the fiscal position of the Commonwealth, he could not 
approve such outlay within the next two years. Chairman Healey 
commented that the matter of the $29 million did not have to be 
acted upon by the Board at this time; it was simply part of a 
planning process which would be reviewed again before a vote on 
this particular item would be requested. In the meantime, he 
said, the five-year plan was an indication of the direction in 
which the Trustees felt the University should be moving. 

Trustee Gordon said the University was faced with the 
choice of educating students or merely accommodating them, and it 
was presently nearing the point of accommodation. He said that 
accommodating rather than educating was not the purpose of the 
institution, but it most certainly should not reach the point 
where instead of accommodating, it would be cheating the students 
and he did not feel the Trustees or the Commonwealth wanted to 
reach the point where they were merely accommodating. 



Secretary Parks said it was certainly not the purpose 
of the Governor or the Office of Educational Affairs to cheat 
students; however, he could not support this expenditure. He 
said he could support the capital outlay program with the exception 
of this particular building. 

In response to a question from Trustee Rowland, Mrs. 
Robinson replied that although in the 1980' s it is anticipated 



4213 



-9- 



Board 
12/1/76 



4214 



Board 
12/1/76 



Report of 
Committee 
on Health 

Affairs 

Financial 
Status of 
Teaching 
Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the number of high school students going on to college would 
be decreasing, the number of 24- to 30-year-olds seeking educa- 
tion is growing. These older students make up a substantial part 
of the student population at UM/Boston. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the FY 1978 Capital Outlay Budget 

Request in the context of the five year Capital 
Outlay Budget as set forth in Trustee Document 
T77-048; further, that at the appropriate time 
the capital outlay budget request for each sub- 
sequent year within said five year budget plan 
shall be subject to review and approval of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Secretary Parks' exception was noted. 

Trustee Spiller said he wished to comment on one addi- 
tional item, related to the Southwest dormitory complex at UM/ 
Amherst. He said a study was underway of methods by which living 



conditions in these buildings could be improved 
said, would be forthcoming to the Trustees. 



A report, he 



University 

Teaching 

Hospital 

Rate Increases 

(Doc. T77-037) 



Chairman Healey asked Trustee Croce to report for the 
Health Affairs Committee in the absence of Trustee Robertson. 
Trustee Croce began by reporting that the Committee had met at 
UM/Worcester on November 22. Chancellor Bulger opened the meet- 
ing by reporting on the financial status of the Medical Center. 
He said that the budgetary situation is necessitating the limit- 
ing of health care services. There had been some discussion of 
the advantages of establishing a trust fund for hospital receiv- 
ables, reported Trustee Croce, but, he added, no teaching hospital 
could expect to be completely self-supporting and the Medical 
Center would continue to require state budgetary support. He 
said also that the cost of running a hospital with 75 beds when 
it was established for 400 beds is necessarily high. 

Trustee Croce turned next to the matter of University 
Teaching Hospital Rate Increases (Doc. T77-037) . The Committee 



was recommending that hospital rates be increased as follows: 



I 



I 



Semi-private Room 
Private Room 
Intensive Care 
Ancillary Charges 



from 

$125 

150 

315 



to 
$155 
185 
440 

+30% 



Trustee Croce said Mrs. Bluestone had expressed some concerns on 
behalf of the Department of Public Health to this rate increase 
and suggested that she might wish to comment. Mrs. Bluestone 
said she was not unalterably opposed to a rate increase, but she 



-10- 



I 






1 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

felt that the Committee had not been given sufficient information 
on which to base their decision. She said she believed that the 
Trustees should look at the whole administrative structure to see 
that everything possible had been done to cut costs before a rate 
increase is requested, that the private sector is complaining 
that the public sector is not being held to the same restrictions 
as the private sector, and that a rationale to justify the in- 
creases should accompany the request. 

Secretary Parks said he was concerned about the deficit 
position of the hospital. Increasing hospital rates was not, in 
his view, the route to take in addressing the problem. He said 
he had heard that operating expenses for 1976 were at a level 
above $6 million, while income from patient care was around $1.5 
million and this would indicate a net cost of around $4.5 million 
His information was that next year the deficit would be even 
greater. 

Trustee Carlson expressed incredulity at the figures 
stated by Secretary Parks and added that he did not feel the 
Board meeting was the place to hold a detailed analysis of the 
hospital revenue and expenditure plan. However, he said, the 
University had made, and would continue to make, every effort to 
keep the deficit within the targeted figure. He said it was the 
budget constraints which had led the University to limit the 
opening of beds in order to minimize cost escalation. 

President Wood explained that the Board was being asked 
at this time to allow the hospital administration to request an 
increase, which the Rate Setting Commission (RSC) would determine 
because if the Commission approves of the rate increase, the law 
requires 60 days after the RSC acts before the rates become effec 
tive. 

Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management and Business 
Affairs, said that actual expenditures for FY 1976 amounted to 
$4,074,754. Revenues for that period were $582,000, so that the 
net cost to the Commonwealth of $3.49 million was just under the 
$3.5 million anticipated. In FY 1977 the budgeted expenditures 
are $9.5 million. The estimated revenues are $6.5. The estimated 
for FY 1978 are: expenditures $12.1 million, revenue $9.2 milliop. 

Secretary Parks asked if these estimates reflected the 
proposed rate increase. Mr. Janis replied that they did not. 
However, there have been some unanticipated expenses, such as 
substantially higher malpractice insurance rates. 

Chancellor Bulger said that the final decision on in- 
creasing the rates would be determined by the Rate Setting Commis 
sion but if they approve, higher rates would result in increasing 
the revenue to the Commonwealth. He did not feel, he said, that 
the third-party payers should benefit at the cost of the Common- 
wealth. 



-11- 



3 



4215 



Board 
12/1/76 



4216 



Board 
12/1/76 



Discussion of 
Group Practice 
Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey said the important factors were: the 
need for early submission of the University's request to the Com- 
mission and the role of the Board in proposing the rate increase. 
Dr. Caper explained that the issue was not one of health care 
costs, but rather of how those health care costs should be allo- 
cated among payers — how much should be borne by federal programs 
for which taxes are paid, and how much should be covered by ap- 
propriations of the Commonwealth. He said that to try to keep 
costs down by not allowing the rate increases would be both inap- 
propriate and ineffective, and that increasing the rates would 
simply put the University Hospital on a comparable basis with 
other major northeastern teaching hospitals. 

Mrs. Kaplan said that she, Mrs. Blues tone and Secretary 
Parks were faced with similar problems in other state agencies, 
but that it was necessary to determine the role of the Board as 
Trustees, knowing that in this role Trustees would not necessarily 
agree with the thinking, say, of the Department of Mental Health. 
Trustee Gordon agreed that determining the role of the Trustees 
in such a complicated matter was important, and stated his belief 
that the Board must depend on recommendations from the Hospital 
Management Board and other professional groups. Trustees Abrams 
and Croce, both members of the Committee on Health Affairs, said 
they supported the rate increase. 

There being no further discussion, with Trustee Gordon 
presiding for Chairman Healey, who had to leave during the fore- 
going discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 



VOTED : To concur in the need for rate increases for the 
University of Massachusetts Teaching Hospital as 
outlined in Document T77-037 and to request that 
the Rate Setting Commission approve said increases. 

Trustees Burack, Conti, and McNeil; Secretary Parks, 
Mrs. Bluestone and Mrs. Kaplan, representing Trustees Dukakis, 
Fielding, and Okin respectively, voted in opposition to the 
motion. 

Secretary Parks said he still would like an answer to 
his question regarding the hospital deficit. President Wood sug- 
gested that this matter could be more appropriately discussed at 
the time of the mid-year budget review. 

Trustee Croce then proceeded to the next agenda item, 
a further discussion of the Group Practice Plan. Two important 
trends in the functioning of the plan have surfaced, he said. 
First, the original plan to return overages from earnings of the 
clinical departments to the Dean for redistribution rather than 
to the department heads has tended to discourage activity in the 
departments with high incomes. Chancellor Bulger had expressed 
his belief that this policy was self-defeating and suggested 
returning the major portion of the overages to the departments 



■12- 



I 



I 



4217 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for redistribution by them. Second, Trustee Croce continued, the 
policy of allowing associate membership in the Group Practice Plan 
to physicians who do more than half their clinical work outside 
the Teaching Hospital has resulted in some inequities. There has 
been discussion of possible changes in the structure of the Group 
Practice Plan, with the understanding that any changes must com- 
ply with the statute that established the Group Practice Trust 
Fund. Discussion of these issues will continue at future meeting^ 
of the Committee on Health Affairs. This concluded Trustee Croce 
report . 

Acting Chairman Gordon next called for the report of 
the Committee on Student Affairs. Trustee Shaler reported that 
the Committee had first considered the Report on MassPIRG (Doc. 
T77-044) , an organization that had been authorized on the campus 
by a Trustee vote in 1972. The report and discussion revolved 
around the following four questions, he said: 

1. Are the activities of MassPIRG qualitatively or 
quantitatively different from those originally 
anticipated? 

2. Is MassPIRG providing an educational experience 
which can continue to be considered incidental 
to the educational purpose of the University? 

3. Have any new legal issues arisen since the 1972 
vote? 

4. Is the fee collecting mechanism still appropriate? 

Trustee Shaler said that after having read the backup 
material and having discussed the matter thoroughly, the commit- 
tee had unanimously voted to recommend MassPIRG' s continuance on 
campus. A motion was made and seconded. 

Trustee Spiller said he still had grave concerns with 
regard to this organization being sponsored on campus. He asked 
that Counsel pursue further the legal ramifications of MassPIRG 
continuing on the campuses because he felt there was potential 
liability for the Trustees due to the way in which MassPIRG oper- 
ates. He said he would not be concerned if it was involved in 
research only, and not in advocacy. He said he was unalterably 
opposed to a negative checkoff system, and especially when it was 
used to fund the operation of an organization involved in advocacy 
Trustee Carlson said he also shared Trustee Spiller' s concerns. 

There being no further discussion, it was then 

VOTED : To reaffirm the Board votes of May 26, 1972, and 

May 2, 1973 pertaining, respectively, to the Western 
Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (WMPIRG I 



-13- 



Board 
12/1/76 



Report of the 
Committee on 
Student Affairs 

Report on 
MassPIRG 
(Doc. T77-044) 



4218 



Board 
12/1/76 



Status Report 
on Tuition 
Waiver Policy 
and Recommend- 
ed Amendments 
(Doc. T77-038) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the Massachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group East (MassPIRG East) , which organizations 
are now merged and known as the Massachusetts 
Public Interest Research Group (MassPIRG) ; 
further, to authorize the Amherst and Boston 
campuses to continue voluntary student fees of 
$2.00 per semester on the basis of a negative 
check-off procedure as heretofore used; provided, 
that if any semester less than fifty percent of 
the students at either campus elect to make such 
payments, such authorization will cease for that 
campus, and provided further, that MassPIRG shall 
reimburse the Commonwealth for any expenses incur- 
red by the University in collecting such payments. 

Trustees Carlson and Spiller voted in opposition to the 



motion. 



The next item of agenda, said Trustee Shaler, was a 
Status Report on Tuition Waiver Policy and Recommended Amendments 



(Doc. T77-038). The Tuition Waiver Policies (Doc. T75-075B) 
adopted by the Board of Trustees in 1975, he said, had tightened 
the criteria under which discretionary waivers could be given and 
as a result there had been a 25 percent reduction in the dollar 
amount of waivers granted. Discussion ensued, he said, on the 
effect the new policy had on certain programs, especially dormi- 
tory counseling, and the Chair had asked for continuing review of 
this matter. Trustee Shaler said it was now necessary to amend 
the current policy. One amendment was necessary to change the 
waiver policy for foreign students to comply with a law enacted 
subsequent to the adoption of the policy, and another to correct 
an inequity. He said the Committee unanimously recommended these 
amendments. Trustee Burack asked if there was a limit to the 
amount of waivers that could be given. Mr. Lynton replied that 
there was a limit on the number of students receiving waivers, 
but not on the amount waived. On motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : That Section 2.2(b) of Trustee Document T75-075B, 
Tuition Waiver Policies, be and hereby is amended 
to read, 

"2.2(b) a minimum of one-half of the campus' 
full TA stipend." 

VOTED : That Section 3.2 of Trustee Document T75-075B, 

Tuition Waiver Policies, be and hereby is amended 
to read, 

"3.2 Foreign Students . A tuition waiver for 
foreign students is an appropriate method of 
encouraging and enabling foreign students to 



•14- 



I 



I 



4219 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

attend the University in order to encourage 
cross-cultural academic interchange. These 
tuition waivers are to be awarded on the 
basis of financial need and are authorized 
up to a maximum of ten percent of the total 
number of foreign graduate students attending 
the granting campus." 

Trustee Shaler said the Committee had next discussed 
the current status of student affairs on the three campuses. 
For the first time, he said, the Committee had heard a report on 
Student Affairs at UM/Worcester . As a result of the report by 
the Accreditation Committee, which had found some deficiencies 
in this area, Joel D. Feinblatt has been appointed Associate Dean 
for Student Affairs. This newly established office, he said, is 
presently devoting its time to personal and vocational counseling. 

Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at UM/AmhersC 
Robert Woodbury, had reported that there were two critical areas 
at Amherst — persistent management problems such as the cost and 
financing of residence halls, and "speculative" problems such as 
the projected job market for graduates. The oral report of the 
UM/Boston campus, he said, was brief, as that campus is preparing 
a full report on support services, expected early in December. 

Trustee Gordon then asked Trustee Troy to report for 
| the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy 
said that the Committee had met earlier that day and their first 
item of agenda was the Transfer of Leisure Studies and Services 
to the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning- 



Board 
12/1/76 



Status Reports 
on Student 
Affairs by 
Campuses 



UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-046) . Since the basic interests of the fac- 
ulty in the Department of Leisure Studies are closely related to 
those in Park Administration within the Department of Landscape 
Architecture and Regional Planning in the College of Food and 
Natural Resources, and since a new program which will be called 
Leisure Studies and Resources is being planned, it had been rec- 
ommended that the present Department of Leisure Studies and Serv- 
ices be transferred from the School of Physical Education to the 
College of Food and Natural Resources, and that when the new pro- 
gram is initiated, the other two majors be discontinued. There 
was no opposition to this recommendation and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the transfer of the Department of 
Leisure Studies and Services from the School 
of Physical Education to the Department of 
Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning 
in the College of Food and Natural Resources, 
as contained in Trustee Document T77-046. 

Trustee Troy said the Committee next discussed the pro- 
posed Appointment of Dr. Mario D. Fantini as Dean of the School 



-15- 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 

UM/Amherst — 
Transfer of 
Leisure Studies 
and Services 
(Doc. T77-046) 



4220 



Board 
12/1/76 

UM/Amherst — 
Appointment 
of Mario D. 
Fantini as 
Dean of the 
School of 
Education and 
Professor of 
Education with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T77-047) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of Education and Professor of Education with Tenure — UM/Amherst 



UM/Worcester — 
Appointment 
of Dr. Israel 
Abroms as 
Associate 
Professor of 
Pediatrics 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T77-049) 



(Doc. T7 7-047). He said that this was a very important and dis- 
tinguished appointment. He said that since Chancellor Bromery 
had spoken of Dr. Fantini 's qualifications earlier, he would not 
enumerate them, but would simply read the Committee's recommenda- 
tion. On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : 



To concur in the appointment of Dr. Mario D. 
Fantini by the President as Professor of 
Education with tenure at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth in Doc 
T77-047. 



and further 



VOTED 



To concur with the President in the appointment 
by the Chancellor of Dr. Mario D. Fantini as Dean 
of the School of Education at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth in Doc. 
T77-047. 



Trustee Gordon then recognized Chancellor Bromery who 
introduced Dean Fantini. 

The next item of agenda, said Trustee Troy, was the 
proposed Appointment of Dr. Israel Abroms as Associate Professor 
of Pediatrics with Tenure — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-049) . He said 



Report of 
Delegate 
to BHE 



that he had seldom heard more enthusiastic recommendations than 
those for Dr. Abroms. Chancellor Bulger added that the Medical 
Center was very proud to have obtained Dr. Abroms' services. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To concur in the appointment of Dr. Israel Abroms 
by the President as Associate Professor of Pediat- 
rics with tenure at the University of Massachusetts 
at Worcester as set forth in Doc. T77-049. 

Trustee Troy said the last item of agenda for the Com- 
mittee was the discussion of a personnel matter at the Harbor Cam- 
pus, which took place during an executive session, and after which 
the meeting was adjourned. 

Trustee Gordon then asked Trustee Troy to report in his 
capacity as delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee 
Troy reported that the BHE met on Friday, November 19, at Bentley 
College in Waltham. Reports of the various committees of the 
Board were heard and accepted. Much of the discussion focused 
on the crisis situation faced by the Board because of the problems 
in getting adequate staff. The person who was to fill the prin- 
cipal budget and finance position on the staff in early November 
withdrew and the position is still unfilled. This means that 
the Board will be able to perform only a perfunctory review of 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the segmental budgets. The Board also faced the problem of find- 
ing a new home, he said, and he has learned subsequent to the 
meeting that it will follow the Board of Education to Park Square 
Following a meeting with the Governor, the Board asked Chancellor 
Keith to prepare an outline of its most essential functions, to 
rank the priorities of its other duties and responsibilities, and 
to prepare a strategy for improving its budgetary support. 

Trustee Spiller asked if there was any further activity 
with regard to the construction of the gymnasium at UM/Boston. 
President Wood replied that pursuant to the motion made by Trus- 
tee Clark and passed at the last Board meeting, he had written to 
Mr. Walter Poitrast, Director of the BBC, on the advice of counsel 
and requested a reply by December 1. If administrative action is 
not forthcoming, he said, the University would move to take legal 
action. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 4:05 p.m. 



4221 



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12/1/76 



UM/ Boston- 
Status of 
Gymnasium 



gJladys(/Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trusteed 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 2, 1977; 2:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Crain, Cronin, Dennis, 
Eddy, Fielding, Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau, Robertson, 
Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trus- 
tee Anrig; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Mrs. Kaplan 
representing Trustee Okin; Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Trustees Absent: Trustees Conti and Gordon 



Office of the President; Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice 
President for Planning; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant 
Vice President; Mr. Searson, Counsel to the University 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery ; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 



Health Affairs; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty Representative 
Guests: Mr. Arthur Menard and Mr. Martin Skoler, Labor Counsel 



Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 2:05 p.m. 
He asked the indulgence of the Board to act on Chairman's privi- 
lege in order to deal with the issue of the gymnasium at UM/ 
Boston and the letter from the Governor asking that the Board 
reconsider its "insistence that the state go forward with con- 
struction of all parts" of the building. Chairman Healey said he 
had received a letter on this matter from Trustee Spiller. As 
Trustee Spiller had to leave the meeting early, the Chairman asked 
him to speak first. Trustee Spiller said his letter reflected 
his concern that the Board was being asked to reconsider long- 
standing commitments to the Harbor campus and the neighboring 
communities. He said he felt it would be very unfair to "back- 
water" on a proposal that had been so thoroughly studied and dis- 
cussed. Also, any further delays in going ahead with construction 



4223 



UM/Boston- 
Gymnasium 






4224 



Board 
2/2/77 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Previous 
Meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in order to redesign the building would bankrupt the project and 
in the long run probably be more costly. He said that the essence 
of his letter was that it would be unfair and impractical to re- 
consider and further delay the project. Noting that he had alway$ 
been a "hatchet man" when it came to budgetary matters, Trustee 
Spiller nevertheless asked the Chairman to cast his vote at the 
proper time to reflect his position of support for proceeding witfi 
the gymnasium project. 

Chairman Healey thanked Trustee Spiller and turned to 
the matter of approval of the minutes of the previous meeting. 
There being no omissions or errors it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the December 1, 
1976 meeting. 

Chairman Healey then returned to the matter of the gym- 
nasium, noting that there had been no committee consideration of 
the issue prior to the meeting and that he had put it on the 
Chairman's agenda for the Board meeting upon receipt of the Gov- 
ernor's letter of last Thursday. He then opened the matter for 
discussion. Secretary Parks said the Governor could not attend 
the meeting and had asked him to open discussion of the issue of 
reconsideration. He said the simplest way to do this was to make 
a motion and he . 

MOVED : That the Board of Trustees reconsider its prior 
vote on approval of the gymnasium on the Harbor 
Campus . 

President Wood said that he would have to have the ad- 
vice of counsel before the Board voted on the motion. He said 
the material distributed to the Trustees at the meeting outlined 
the situation the Board was in at the time the Governor's letter 
had been received. The proposed gymnasium had been designed and 
redesigned and had been the subject of a series of exhaustive re 
views and re-reviews. Money to construct the building had been 
appropriated by the 1974 session of the General Court. Despite 
all of this, the University had been unable to secure action from 
the Bureau of Building Construction in calling for bids for the 
construction contract. At the November 3, 1976 meeting the Board 
had voted unanimously to direct the President to use all adminis- 
trative and legal means necessary to proceed with construction of 
the gymnasium. Pursuant to this motion, President Wood said he 
had directed the General Counsel of the University to file suit 
against the BBC in order to secure release of the drawings for 
bid. The suit had been filed, the Attorney General had filed a 
motion of dismissal and a hearing was to be held within two weeks 
Because of this, President Wood said Counsel should be asked if 
the Secretary's request for reconsideration would, in his judg- 
ment, have any substantial effect on the law suit. Secretary 
Parks asked the Chairman if the possible effect the question might 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

have on a law suit was not secondary to the legality of the ques- 
tion itself. Chairman Healey said he would be willing to listen 
to Counsel's opinion on the matter. He asked if there was a 
legal question involved. Counsel Searson said that in his opinion 
it was legally proper for the Board to deal with a motion for re- 
consideration. He said the impact of the motion on the law suit 
was an entirely different matter. 

Mrs. Robinson, citing the five motions passed by the 
Board in the preceeding three years and the November motion di- 
recting the President to act, asked Secretary Parks which motion 
he wished to be reconsidered. Secretary Parks said that the only 
motion he wanted to be considered was that motion that had an im- 
pact on making the decision to go forward with the building of 
the gymnasium. Chairman Healey cautioned that the Board could 
get mired in technical issues for the duration of the meeting. 
He said he thought that the Trustees knew what was involved in 
the Governor's request for reconsideration and that the lines were 
reasonably clearly drawn. For this reason he accepted the Secre- 
tary's motion to reconsider the November 3, 1976 vote of the Boarc 
If clarifications or additions were needed he would accept them 
in due time. He stressed that a policy decision had to be made 
and if, as had been stated, inflation was adding some $65,000 per 
month to the cost of the building, it was time to act. He called 
for discussion on the matter. 

Trustee Carlson said the issue was a difficult one, 
chiefly because of the timing. He said that the Governor's 
arguments were persuasive. The present state of the economy of 
the Commonwealth had to be considered by the Trustees, and the 
Governor was operating well within his administrative province 
to suggest reconsideration. On the other hand, he found the 
argument based on the years-old commitment to the campus and the 
community a very powerful one. However, he said, the most com- 
pelling argument for proceeding with the construction of the 
building was a very simple one — unless the Board were willing to 
decide as a matter of policy that it would never in the foresee- 
able future proceed with the building, then the longer construc- 
tion is delayed, the more it is going to cost. As Trustee Spiller 
had pointed out in his letter, he said, to redesign the building 
could result in a delay of a year. In that time cost escalations 
could result in a total outlay by the Commonwealth for a reduced 
building that would equal the outlay for the building as present- 
ly planned. He urged the Trustees to focus on the practical 
point that if the gymnasium was to be built, nothing will be 
gained by further delays. He said the Trustees should try in all 
possible ways to proceed with construction of the building. Trus- 
tee Rowland pointed out that if funds for the building had been 
forthcoming when they were authorized, money would have been saved 

Trustee Robertson said he found himself on the horns of 
a dilemma. The University was being forced to operate under in- 



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2/2/77 



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2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

creasingly stringent fiscal constraints, constraints which in his 
opinion had already damaged the University. As a Trustee, working 
in such an atmosphere, he felt he had to concentrate on what he 
considered to be the most important things for the University — 
quality education and the need to maintain established programs 
of value. He said he did not understand the need for the gymnasiu ! 
in this context and would like guidance as to its importance to 
what was basically a commuting, daytime, urban campus and to the 
community. 

Trustee Clark said she understood the dilemma but she 
felt it was necessary to understand the purpose of capital outlay 
funds. Such funds were appropriated at a specific time and for a 
specific project. The funds were not subject to transfer from 
one project to another and an incoming administraiton could not 
cancel or impound an appropriation passed under a preceding ad- 
ministration. 



As to the importance of the gymnasium to the community, 
Trustee Clark continued, offering the option of using either the 
Devine Rink at Neponset Circle or the Murphy Rink in South Boston 
as the Governor had suggested in his letter, was unrealistic; the 
former was unsafe and sinking, the latter was totally inadequate. 
Also, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan District Commission 
had said that the youngsters could use the rinks between 9:30 a.m 
and 1:00 p.m., at which time most of them were either working or 
attending classes. As for young people in the Savin Hill area, 
they have to go as far afield as Quincy or Hingham in order to 
find ice time. She said residents of the community were 100 per- 
cent in favor of the gymnasium and to redesign the building yet 
again, this time eliminating the skating rink, would destroy its 
worth. While understanding the need for fiscal restraint, she 
continued, she did not think any of the arguments of the Governor 
and the Secretary "held water." 



Trustee Shearer said she wanted to talk particularly 
about the community at Columbia Point. Over the weekend she 
talked to many people about this. The community had been isolated 
twenty years ago and was even more isolated today. The further 
isolation was partly due to changing physical circumstances and 
partly due to social pressures such as busing. The members of thje 
community have very limited incomes and no resources. To all 
intents and purposes, she said, they have been forgotten by most 
city and state service organizations. Many of them know about 
the proposed gymnasium, although they had not been involved in thje 
planning and design. They just know there is going to be a gym 
with a skating rink. She recalled when some of the children in 
the community had received ice skates one Christmas and had no 
place to skate until a hallway window was accidentally broken. 
The rain and snow that accumulated froze and the children skated 
in the hall. The alternatives suggested by the M.D.C., she con- 
tinued, were totally unrealistic. To tell young people at the 



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4227 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Point they had the option of going to South Boston to skate was 
ludicrous. For track practice, maybe. Skating? No. Trustee 
Shearer rejected Neponset Circle as an alternative for skating 
because the cost of transportation would make it prohibitive. 
The people of the community looked to the new gym as a resource 
for them, and she saw it as a way to bring them out of their 
environment, to become acquainted with what could be out there 
for them. Trustee Shearer said she could not say to them now, 
"Don't even dream about playing hockey, ice skate in the halls," 
and therefore she could not support reconsideration of the Board's 
prior action. 

Trustee McNeil said that she was concerned with the 
effects of the costs of maintenance of the gymnasium on the qual- 
ity of education at UM/Boston in view of the fiscal restraints 
imposed on the University. Mrs. Robinson said the estimates of 
maintenance costs had been very carefully drawn up by Chancellor 
Golino's office and were realistic. The gymnasium was the first 
building at UM/Boston to have been designed with energy conserva- 
tion as a design factor. Further, the campus staff was very 
sophisticated in terms of energy conservation. For these reasons, 
she said, the figure given for the cost of utilities was valid 
for an extended period. Also, some of the staffing for the new 
facility would not entail additional expenditures; for example, 
hockey staffing would be needed whether the program was held in 
the new gym or in neighboring rinks. The estimates include 
evening and weekend operation of the facility. She noted that 
staying within the estimates assumed careful husbanding of re- 
sources. 

Chancellor Golino said that an even more basic question 
than maintenance costs had been raised by Trustee Robertson — the 
need for a gymnasium on a campus which served commuter students. 
As a graduate of a commuter campus, he said, he felt students 
at such campuses needed facilities of this kind even more than 
did students at a more traditional campus. Many of the students 
at urban campuses come from backgrounds and neighborhoods where 
amenities such as swimming pools and skating rinks are not avail- 
able. The younger students work either part or full time, as do 
the older students who have additional responsibilities. The 
opportunities for them to take part in physical recreation is 
very limited in the neighborhoods from which they come. Thus 
it is important that the urban campus offer not only the needed 
intellectual stimulus but also some of the things of which the 
students have been deprived, and physical exercise is a necessary 
part of daily activity and of education. 



As to relations with the neighboring communities , Chan- 
cellor Golino continued, the one thing that the Trustees and Pres- 
ident had stressed when the Harbor Campus first opened was that 
the University must be a constructive force in the community. To 
this end, UM/Boston offered a variety of educational opportunities- 



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4228 



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2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

regular courses, mini-courses and special courses and activities. 
However, 60 percent of the Columbia Point population is under 18 
years of age and the University does not have the facilities to 
provide them with anything other than classroom activities. He 
noted that the suggestions that facilities were available else- 
where had been fully answered by Trustees Clark and Shearer. He 
said he understood the State's economic position, but to withdraw 
a long held commitment to the campus and to the community, espe- 
cially since the financial savings stemming from the withdrawal 
were either insubstantial or non-existent, would be self-defeating 
and extremely demoralizing. 

Secretary Parks said that he knew the consequences of 
the busing controversy that Trustee Clark had mentioned as well 
as anyone. He said he understood the need for physical education 
facilities and applauded UM/Boston's continuing efforts to have a 
working relationship with the neighboring community. However, 
neither of these was the issue. The issue was the availability 
of reasonable alternatives that could accommodate the ongoing 
activities of the University. He said he supported the building 
of the gymnasium but questioned the need for a swimming pool and 
a skating rink. The Metropolitan District Commission had recently 
let several contracts to convert the Devine Rink at Neponset into 
a major sports facility and construction would start in the spring. 
In his talks with the Governor and the Commissioner of the M.D.C. 
he said, commitments had been made to make any necessary arrange- 
ments in order to guarantee that acceptable facilities could be 
made available at the times necessary to accommodate whatever 
programs the University has that require the use of a hockey 
rink. He said the government was not trying to destroy the 
ability of the University to relate to the community. He re- 
called his efforts to have the campus established at Columbia 
Point and his continuing insistence that the University main- 
tain an open face toward the community and provide services 
to it. His arguments, sometimes misinterpreted as threats, that 
institutions should be combined had been made in order to ensure 
that UM/Boston would be a major urban institution and the best 
example of such an institution in the country. He said that the 
Commonwealth had invested a great deal of money in the nearby 
facilities and that these should be shared. There should be a 
balance between the State's fiscal situation and the needs of the 
community and the institution. For these reasons, he concluded, 
he had proposed and continued to propose that the Trustees move 
forward with the gymnasium but not with the swimming pool and the 
skating rink. 

Trustee Clark said that if the M.D.C. 's proposed major 
sports complex included the Hockey Forum, the Trustees should be 
aware that plans to renovate the Forum had been discussed for 
seven years and had yet to get off the ground. Also, she pointed 
out, the relationship between the University and the community 
was a two way street. It was not a case of the University always 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

giving and the community always taking. The University needed 
the cooperation of the community in many areas and this cooperation 
had been forthcoming. The relationship had worked and worked well 
because all worked together. The community is one hundred percent 
behind the University on the gym as it is with the Kennedy Library 
On the subject of the Devine Rink, she said the hours the rink 
would be available to the University, 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., made 
little sense as the students were either attending class or work- 
ing at that time. If other times were allotted, conflicts would 
arise with young people in Neponset and Savin Hill who already 
have to struggle to get ice time. To add yet more claimants was 
an incomprehensible suggestion. 

President Wood, speaking to the points that had been 
made, said that the record of the last seven years showed that 
the University worked, where and when possible, in cooperation 
and coordination with any other institution or group. This will- 
ingness to cooperate included an educational contract with North- 
eastern University, working with the Peninsula Group in terms of 
the development of Columbia Point, and efforts to have common 
activities with Community and State Colleges. whenever an oppor- 
tunity to cooperate with a sister agency had presented itself, the 
University had taken it. However, he continued, cooperation will 
not necessarily work when it involves a commuter campus and nearby 
and not-so-nearby facilities. One of the University's responsibil- 
ities was to schedule an appropriate mix of education and recreation 
when the students were on campus. He said experience in the Five 
College Program at Amherst had shown that it was necessary to 
schedule four hours for a given cooperative class because of the 
travel time involved. President Wood said he was convinced that 
the M.D.C. Commissioner would cooperate in every way possible, but 
the proposed alternative would not allow the University to meet 
its responsibilities to its students or the community. 

Another point to be considered, President Wood continuec 
was the effect of the cost of the proposed gymnasium on the State '|s 
fiscal condition. If one were to review all capital outlay budgets 
for FY 1972 through FY 1974 in order to ease the State's fiscal 
crisis by eliminating certain proposals, he suggested that "a 
full baker's dozen" of more likely candidates than the UM/Boston 
gymnasium would be found. The more likely candidates would be 
those projects less developed, less carefully examined by experts 
and Boards of Trustees and Committees. He said that he regarded 
the singling out of the gym as not seriously responding to, or 
changing or altering in any significant way, the State's general 
fiscal condition. 

Trustee Cronin said he agreed with the President. He 
said he was reminded of the last Board meeting when the Arts and 
Science Building was discussed and proposals were made to parcel 
out people, some to go to the Massachusetts College of Art, others 
to go to other facilities. He said such proposals did not address! 



Board 
2/2/77 



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4230 



Board 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the issue of fostering a university spirit. He added that the Uni 
versity of Massachusetts is the only major state university that 
does not have a hockey rink on any campus. A university had to 
have facilities other than just classrooms if it was to avoid be- 
ing labelled a high school. 



Trustee Marks asked Secretary Parks if he was proposing 
the permanent elimination of the rink and pool or just their de- 
layed installation. Secretary Parks replied that a staged process 
of construction was a reasonable proposal in view of the State's 
fiscal situation. He said there were a number of reasons why the 
administration was proposing that only the gym part of the building 
be built at this time: the costs of floating a bond issue; the 
possibility of future development of the building; his understand- 
ing that the gym was not to be used for extramural competitive 
activities; and the already mentioned alternative facilities. He 
said the last item would require a program and suggested that the 
Trustees examine such a program. 



Mrs. Robinson said that it had been suggested earlier 
that UM/Boston should be a major urban institution and that it 
might be helpful to the Trustees to know the dimensions of such 
institutions. The Planning Office had made a survey of ten urban 
institutions, including Wisconsin at Madison, the Chicago Circle 
Campus, Temple and Wayne State, and other institutions in the 
Northeast. All institutions surveyed had swimming pools and all 
were the same size or larger than that proposed for UM/Boston, 
which just meets New Jersey high school standards and is only 
half the "Olympic size" mentioned in the Governor's letter. She 
said the space which would be devoted to physical education if 
the gym were built as planned, and if the existing squash courts 
were included, would average 12 to 13 square feet per student. 
At all SUNY four year colleges the average is 21 square feet per 
student. The planned gym would give the campus one-half as much 
physical education space as that at M.I.T. (4,000 undergraduates), 
one-third as much as UM/Amherst and much less than one-half as 
much as Salem State (5,000 students). As indicated in the Plan- 
ning Office memo to the Trustees, current architectural plans 
included the option of postponing installation of the swimming 
pool. Thus, when bids are received, costs of the gym with and 
without a pool will be known. This is one approach to a staged 
process, but to have a staged process for the rink would be a 
very costly exercise. New drawings would have to be made. The 
air handling system for the entire building would have to be re- 
located, affecting five different sets of drawings, necessitating 
additional piles and requiring construction of new housing for 
the system at a cost of at least $115,000 more. If the rink is 
delayed, resultant cost escalations would amount to a further 
$135,000 to $185,000. If the Secretary was serious about a 
staged process and would want to reattach the rink later, the 
ultimate cost of the project would be much greater. It was 
difficult, she said, to understand why it would be easier to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

fund $5 million three years from now than $2 million now. Mrs. 
Robinson said that previous delays in proceeding with construction 
of the gym were unfortunate in terms of the State's fiscal situa- 
tion, but equally unfortunate was the timing of the proposed re- 
consideration of the planned building. If proposals to delay 
construction of the hockey rink had been made two years ago or 
even a year and a half ago, designing the facility differently 
would have been a straightforward matter, but that was not done 
and now completed plans are available and with each month of delay 
in construction it is costing $65,000 more. 

In response to Secretary Parks' question, Mrs. Robinson 
said the plans for a regulation size swimming pool merely antici- 
pated the possibility of competitive swimming. Secretary Parks 
said he and the Governor had been told very clearly that there 
would not be competitive sports at UM/Boston. Also, he said the 
cost of redesigning could not realistically be compared with the 
cost savings of eliminating certain portions. 



three 

UM/Bo 

munit 

years 

over 

Parks 

gets 



Trustee Morgenthau said she would like the answers to 
questions. What is the use of the present facilities at 
ston, at all hours, by both students and members of the com- 



y> 



What is the projected use over the next five to ten 



, based on projections of the community's structure and needs 
the same time period? Finally, a question for Secretary 
, what other projects in the capital outlay program are tar- 
of the Governor's proposals for reconsideration? 



Chancellor Golino said the facilities were very heavily 
used. He had been told that staff, faculty, students and the 
community were continually being refused access to the facilities 
because of lack of space. Squash courts must be reserved weeks 
in advance; the students' basketball club had trouble getting 
practice time; and the pool is so small, with a maximum capacity 
for twenty people, that it is a constant source of general dis- 
satisfaction because so many people are not allowed to use it, 
particularly in the summer months. The facilities are in use all 
during the day and, especially because of the extended day pro- 
gram, the evening. The facilities are open and they are used. 

In speaking of the projected structure of the community, 
President Wood said, the University made a commitment in 1970 
that no one would be moved from the peninsula who didn't want to 
move. All planning and other activities were predicated on this 
commitment. He said that the possibility of additional housing 
was being studied and could result in an increase in the residen- 
tial population of approximately 1,000 to 2,000. Trustee Clark 
said that the structure of the surrounding community was very 
solid. The population was not going to diminish in size and the 
houses were not going to fall down. Families are now second and 
third generation in the area and they will remain through the 
fourth and fifth generation. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In answer to Trustee Morgenthau's third question, Secre- 
tary Parks said just about every building proposal in the capital 
outlay program was being questioned. The Governor had vetoed a 
capital outlay proposal for a dormitory at Fitchburg State College 
Things were tightening up and no proposal in any institution of 
higher education, including those for which appropriations had 
been made, was being given a green light. Trustee Troy, saying 
that the cost of the gym as designed would be about $9.5 million, 
asked the Secretary for a rough estimate of the savings to be 
realized by eliminating the pool and the rink. Secretary Parks 
said he had heard figures ranging from $3 to $4 million. He did 
not know if these were low or high. Chancellor Golino said the 
savings would be about $2 million, not including the expenses in- 
curred in making the suggested change. Trustee Troy said he did 
not believe the amount of savings to be significant enough to 
justify modification of the design, particularly in view of the 
needs of the students and the community and the relationship of 
the University and the community. Secretary Parks said the admin- 
istration had to deal with the total capital outlay and every sav- 
ing was meaningful. 

Trustee Crain asked when the energy saving features in 
the design had been incorporated and when the latest cost estimates 
had been made. Mr. Meehan said the energy saving features had 
been designed about two years ago when the campus had embarked on 
a program to cut all utility costs. The program reduced the 
electric bill very substantially. Mrs. Robinson said the cost 
estimates had been updated last January with the intent to go 
to bid in the summer. Trustee Crain said he found himself having 
to deal with a very controversial issue somewhat prematurely as 
a new member of the Board, and that he was particularly sensitive 
to the State's financial situation, the difficulties facing the 
State in any bond funding attempts, and the Governor's point of 
view. In doing his "homework" he had stopped at Neponset and 
had visited the present UM/Boston pool and gym. He said he was 
not persuaded that it is practical to assume people can be trans- 
ported feasibly back and forth to Neponset. As a graduate of a 
largely commuter campus and being convinced that education should 
be twofold — both the mind and the body need to be developed — 
he said there was a need for the proposed gymnasium. However, 
based on recent experience he felt the Trustees would be shocked 
when the actual, hard cost figures are known. He said he could 
accept a decision to build the suggested facility, with full 
knowledge that this might lead to even harder decisions in the 
future. A commitment to any kind of physical education facility 
at this time unquestionably meant less support for more academi- 
cally oriented requirements in the future. With knowledge of the 
implications involved, he said he was inclined to support the 
facility. 

Trustee Marks said he was having difficulties with the 
issue. The Trustees are being asked, he said, to reconsider a 



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4233 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

prior action of the Board based on the Governor's fully under- 
standable request to do so. However, he felt a chilling factor 
had been introduced at the meeting. The chilling factor was that 
the Trustees had to deal not only with reconsideration of prior 
action but also with the very real possibility that additional 
buildings that have been through the capital outlay process at 
the Board level were in danger of being cancelled. It would be 
one thing to deal with the matter of the gymnasium and the post- 
ponement of a portion of it, which one could believe would be 
added later. However, if the Board is dealing with the gym in the 
context that all buildings are up for reconsideration, that is 
quite another matter and this he considered a "chilling consequence 
within which to re-examine the issue of modifying the original 
proposal. 



President Wood said that Trustee Spiller had reported 
on the capital outlay program at the last meeting and Secretary 
Parks had commented on some of his priorities at that time. The 
gymnasium had been seen as apart from, and ahead in a time sequenc 
of, the overall capital outlay program. Trustee Burack pointed 
out that there was a difference, as funds had been appropriated 
for the gym. Prior to the meeting, she had been committed to the 
idea of being able to postpone the rink, but she did not know that 
there were designs in hand for a gym with or without a pool, and 
that an alternative to the rink would be a very costly proposition 
While feeling very strongly that there is need for a gym and a 
pool, she said she could have been persuaded to delay the rink 
and she was troubled that the rink was tied in with the heating 
system. 

Secretary Parks said the whole issue facing the govern- 
ment was the need of going to the bond market and the costs this 
entailed. The State had only a limited number of dollars and 
there were numerous proposals to be considered. All building 
proposals were being re-examined but the administration was not 
doing this happily. The University was not being accused of being 
irresponsible in designing a reasonable facility for the students 
and the community. The University was being told that maybe the 
State could not afford the designed building at this time. 

Trustee Fielding said he felt badly about coming to a 
Trustee meeting and seeing one branch of the State government 
suing another. Without assigning right to either side he said he 
was appalled at this, as it represented a breakdown of the worst 
kind. He noted that he was at the meeting as a Trustee and as 
head of a fairly large human services agency. He felt that some 
of his experiences in the latter role probably were relevant to 
the discussion of fiscal restraints. His agency's budget for FY 
1978 would be increased by about 3.5 to 4 percent despite the fact 
costs would increase much more. Programs that his department was 
anxious to expand or begin included better facilities for alco- 
holics and services for multihandicapped children. He said he 



Board 
2/2/77 



-11- 



4234 



Board 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

did not cite these programs to engender sympathy but as a means of 
making the point that the Trustees should not look at dollars and 
say that because they are part of capital outlay they are not 
related to the operational funds of either the State or the Uni- 
versity. He said that it was a mistake not to look at the Uni- 
versity's needs in the larger context of other needs. 

Another issue, he continued, was the kind of facility 
that was being discussed. The real need was for a facility that 
produced the greatest opportunity for a lifelong exercise program. 
not one which was designed for the few years of competitive sprint 
of energy. To have a hockey rink was of less value, in some over- 
all sense, than a skating rink, and a jogging track was even better. 
In summary, he said, his concerns were those of where dollars should 
be invested and the need to maximize the use of the proposed facil- 
ity so that it would not be directed only to younger people. 

Trustee Shearer said that the original discussions about 
the use of the facility had been centered on the needs of families 
and not just younger people. Also, it was important to note that 
the communities around the peninsula did not have the facilities 
that are available elsewhere. She said that part of her job at 
the Office for Children was to try to suggest to people things 
their children could do, as well as activities for the family. 
One overriding consideration was for activities that did not cost 
much money; at times even carfare could be prohibitive. For this 
reason, and many others, the gym had always been seen as a resourqe 
for the family. When the community was first approached on the 
subject of what shared facilities should be developed, the gym 
was always the first to be suggested. Trustee Shearer said she 
had a carton full of plans, counterplans, overlays and underlays 
dating from years back, all concerned with a building she had 
yet to see. 



Chairman Healey said that Trustee Shearer was absolutely 
correct in what she said about the original plans for the gym. 
If the Board, as then constituted, had one principle it was that 
residents of the community would not be on the wrong side of a 
chain link fence surrounding the gymnasium. He said the basic 
problem now facing the Board was one of timing. Trustee Rowland 
had been right to point out that if the gym had been built when 
it should have been built, the meeting would not still be discuss- 
ing what kind of facility was needed to achieve mens sana in 
corpore sano . That could be debated forever , as could the need 
for a jogging track. Simply put, the facility has not been laid 
out as a jogging track and time is running out. He said if there 
is any validity in the notion that American business is run on 
a cost benefit program, then the other side of the fiscal coin 
must also be considered. If one says in effect that cost savings 
result from not implementing a plan, then one must also say what 
is being jeopardized. In the light of the cost savings which 
might result, it would not be justifiable to go back to the stu- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

dents and the community and say, "You are second class citizens 
again." Chairman Healey said he understood the Governor's pro- 
gram and the problems he was trying to cope with. In his opinion 
the Governor was one of the most fiscally responsible chief exec- 
utives the State had seen in years and he did not like to make 
his job any tougher. However, the Board boasted members of the 
financial world like Trustee Spiller and others who have agonized 
over this issue. He said the issue is basically simple: if the 
Board did not act at this time, inevitably the Board would meet 
again a year hence and try once again to decide what to do about 
the gym. 

The meeting then heard expressions of support for the 
gymnasium from Jerry DeChristof aro, UM/Boston Student and Red 
Cross Aquatics Instructor, and James O'Leary, Chairman of the 
Executive Committee of the UM/Boston Alumni. 

Chairman Healey then moved the question on the motion: 

MOVED : To reconsider the authorization and approval by 
the Board of Trustees of plans for the Physical 
Education Building (Building 120) on the UM/Boston 
Harbor Campus and the authorization of all neces- 
sary legal and administrative steps to expedite its 
construction. 

For the motion: Trustees Burack, Colby, Dennis, Fielding, Kaplan 
and Parks. 

Against the motion: Trustees Breyer, Carlson, Clark, Crain, 
Cronin, Healey, Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau, Robertson, 
Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, Troy and Wood. 

MOTION REJECTED. 

Chairman Healey said that the next item of business 
would be the report of the Nominating Committee as Trustee Rowland 
Chairman of the Committee, would have to leave shortly. Trustee 
Rowland said her colleagues on the Nominating Committee were 
Trustees Breyer, Dennis, Morgenthau and Spiller. Chairman Healey, 
President Wood and Secretary Hardy were also at the January 18, 
1977 meeting. The Committee decided to continue the practice of 
two standing committee assignments to each Trustee. In making 
assignments the Committee had tried to place Trustees on commit- 
tees which reflected their special interests and qualifications. 
Another consideration had been continuity of committee member- 
ships. In addition to the proposed committee assignments, Trustee 
Rowland, on behalf of the Nominating Committee, nominated Joseph 
P. Healey as Chairman of the Board, Gladys Keith Hardy as Secre- 
tary, Dorothy Eichel as Assistant Secretary and Frederick S. Troy 
as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. There being no 
discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 



4235 



Board 
2/2/77 






Nominating 

Committee 

Report 

(Doc. T77-057) 






-13- 



4236 



Board 
2/2/77 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To confirm and approve the following Officers of 
the Board of Trustees, together with Committee 
assignments, for the period February 1977 to the 
annual meeting in 1978, as follows: 



Chairman 
Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 



Joseph P. Healey 
Gladys Keith Hardy 
Dorothy Eichel 



Report of 
Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 



The delegate to the Board of Higher Education 
and the Committee assignments for 1977-78 are 
as contained in Document T77-057. 

Trustee Rowland called for a round of applause for the Officers, 
which was forthcoming. 

Chairman Healey thanked the Trustees for their vote of 
confidence. Explaining that Trustee Carlson had to leave early, 
he then asked him to give the report of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance. Trustee Carlson said the committee had conducted an 
expeditious meeting, most items on the agenda being non-controver- 
sial. He said this condition would not obtain in the future. He 
then read the proposed votes and it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To accept the bequest of Paul W. Rhoades in the 
amount of $25,000 to establish the Paul Whitney 
Rhoades and Carolina Pree Rhoades Educational 
Trust as an Endowment Fund in accordance with the 
terms of the Last Will and Testament of Paul Whitney 
Rhoades, Doc. T77-054, and to delegate to the Chan- 
cellor /Amherst Campus the selection of the recip- 
ient (s) of the scholarship (s) established by said 
trust; provided, however, that the Trustees, in 
consultation with the Provost/Amherst Campus, shall 
designate the academic area(s) eligible under said 
trust and the department to participate in the 
nomination process in accordance therewith. 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, to sell 146 shares of 
General Electric Company unregistered stock and to 
deposit the net proceeds from said sale in addition 
to the check for $26.62 in the Polymer Science Gen- 
eral Electric Foundation Grant Fund, all as describee 
in Doc. T77-055. 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson to sell 
5.443 shares of Massachusetts Investors Trust re- 
ceived as a stock dividend so that the proceeds may 
be added to the principal of MHR Wrestling Scholar- 
ship section of the Barber Endowment Fund/Amherst . 



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4237 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, to sell 1500 shares 
of Old Republic International common stock and to 
deposit the proceeds from said sale to the Spiegel 
Memorial Fund/Boston. 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, to sell 200 shares of 
Beneficial Finance Corp. common stock and to deposit 
the proceeds from said sale to the Spiegel Memorial 
Fund/Boston. 

VOTED : That there be and hereby is delegated to the Treas- 
urer of the University, and as directed by the 
Treasurer, or in his absence, the Associate Treasurer 
and Assistant Treasurer for the time being in office 
the power and authority to invest and reinvest the 
surplus cash in trust funds of the University of 
Massachusetts in savings accounts, savings certifi- 
cates, certificates of deposit, repurchase agree- 
ments, or Treasury notes and bills; to sell securiti^e 
received by the University or in the name of the 
Trustees of the University when the value thereof 
does not exceed $20,000, depositing the proceeds 
thereof to the appropriate accounts; to open new 
accounts for University funds; to make deposits in 
and withdrawals from accounts in the name of the 
University of Massachusetts; and to sign or endorse 
in the name of the University of Massachusetts or 
the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts such official documents and vouchers, including 
checks, drafts, letters of credit, certificates of 
deposit and withdrawal orders as require the signa- 
ture of the financial officer of the University, 
provided that all checks, drafts, letters of credit 
certificates of deposit and withdrawal orders in an 
amount of $10,000 or more shall require the signature 
of any two officers named herein. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the matter of the pro- 
posed Establishment of an Amino Acid Analyzer Trust Fund and 
Usage Fee Schedule — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-058) . Trustee Fieldinjg 
said he had a general question about the fee schedule of trust 
funds. The proposed fee schedule provided for a very significant 
subsidy over cost by individuals not connected with the Univer- 
sity, who would have to pay twice as much as members of the Uni- 
versity staff. He asked if this was the posture the University 
should take on all trust funds. Chancellor Bulger said the Uni- 
versity's goal in establishing trust funds was not to make it 
difficult for outsiders to use the facilities. The intention was 
to make it advantageous for both staff and non-staff to do so. 
The proposed fee schedule, which he understood to be consistent 



-15- 



Board 
2/2/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of Amino Acid 
Analyzer Trust 
Fund and Usage 
Fee Schedule 
(Doc. T77-058) 



4238 



Board 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with practice throughout the University, was not intended to be 
inhibitory to anyone. Trustee Fielding said he would find it 
difficult to support charging outsiders double the amount charged 
to staff at a time when efforts were being made to promote cooper- 
ative efforts. Mr. Janis said the fee schedule did not provide 
for a surplus; it would only enable the unit to be self-supporting 
Obviously, there was a price reduction for those whose interests 
are research related but there was no attempt to soak the outsiders 
He acknowledged that staff was deriving some benefit from the 
schedule . 

Trustee Fielding said he was not concerned about possible 
benefit. His concern was that setting up a different incentive 
scale could lead to staff members doing something frivolous and 
paying nothing and a non-staff member would have to pay double 
the price. He said he did not question the trust fund per se ; 
he did question the system of financial incentives. Trustee 
Carlson said he found it difficult to believe that frivolous use 
of the equipment would be tolerated given the high degree of the 
management capability of the Worcester campus and the financial 
problems it faced. Trustee Crain said that if the operation were 
to be truly self-supporting, it was imperative that data be avail- 
able which indicated clearly that income did in fact equal costs. 
He said that the material he had read did not make it clear that 
the University trust funds were fully cost loaded; for example, 
there was no mention of overhead cost. Trustee Carlson said such 
costs were included but not specified. Also, all trust funds werje 
reviewed annually by the Committee on Budget and Finance and any 
cost/fee discrepancies were rectified. There being no further 
discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To establish the University of Massachusetts/ 

Worcester Amino Acid Analyzer Trust Fund, which 
shall have as a purpose the maintenance of a 
testing program for the amino acid analyzer at 
the Medical Center. 

The costs of this self-supporting program will 
be recovered from charges to sponsored reserach 
contracts and grants to University of Massachusetts 
personnel, as well as to other state agencies and 
nonprofit institutions. 

Disbursements from said fund shall be on the 
authority of the Chancellor or his designee. 

VOTED : That the following usage fees be and hereby are 
established for the Amino Acid Analyzer, Medical 
Center, said fees to be paid into the Amino Acid 
Analyzer Trust Fund for the maintenance and opera- 
tion of the testing program outlined in Trustee 
Document T77-058: 



■16- 



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» 



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4239 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Usage Fee Schedule 

I. Usage Fee of $50/analysis *) **) 

Personnel of the University of Massachusetts 
Medical Center and affiliated hospitals 

University of Massachusetts personnel 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts institutions 

II. Usage Fee of $100/analysis *) **) 

Non-Profit institutions conducting biomedical 
research 

III. Waiver of user fee: 

By petition, primarily for University of Massa- 
chusetts Medical Center personnel lacking grants 
or other appropriate funds approved by the Chan- 
cellor or his designee 



Board 
2/2/77 



1 



*) 



1 



Analysis of biological fluids 

Discount of 10% for series of more than 10 

samples . 

Discount of 20% for series of more than 20 

samples . 

(These discounts are justified by the reduction 

in the number of calibration runs required.) 



Trustee Fielding said he had removed his objection but did ask 
that the issue be brought, as a general issue, to an appropriate 
committee for future Board consideration. Trustee Carlson said 
this request would be considered. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the item Es t ab lishment 
of Medical Education Trust Fund — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-066) . 
He said the proposed fund was a means of enhancing the service ofj 
the faculty to the medical profession through self-sustaining 
continuing education programs. Trustee Fielding said he felt 
there was a general issue involved in this proposal. The issue 
deserved discussion before a committee and much more supporting 
material than was presently available. The material given to the 
Board did not indicate the costs or services involved. Trustee 
Carlson said this would be an appropriate matter for the Committeje 
on Health Affairs. He said he was prepared to defer the vote if 
the Trustees so desired. Chairman Healey suggested that the Trust 
Fund could be approved with the understanding that the issues 
raised would be considered by the Committee on Health Affairs. 

Chancellor Bulger said that the continuing education 



-17- 



UM/Worcester — 

Es t ab 1 i shmen t 

of Medical 

Education Trust 

Fund 

(Doc. T77-066) 



4240 



Board 
2/2/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T77-061) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

program for physicians in the Commonwealth was part of the basic 
stated mission of the Medical School. To his knowledge this was 
unique; other medical schools had not stated this as part of their 
mission. In developing the program, he said, Board review of the 
operation would be welcome. President Wood said the full issue 
of continuing education and fee-assisted activities on all cam- 
puses should be reviewed, not just those of the professional serv- 
ices at Worcester. Trustee Crain stressed that any program de- 
signed to help professionals in the private sector should be fully 
cost loaded and self-sustaining. If this was not done it would 
drain resources from the students who were not professionals. 
President Wood agreed but said that the issue of where the bene- 
ficiary of those resources was located within the University was 
a "separable question." 

Chairman Healey said these were broad policy questions 
affecting all portions of the University. He said it was importaht 
to start the Medical Education Trust Fund with the understanding 
that it would be subject to review, and deal with the broader 
issues later. There was no further discussion and it was moved 
and seconded, and 



VOTED : To establish the University of Massachusetts/ 
Worcester Medical Education Trust Fund, which 
shall have as a purpose the providing of programs 
in professional continuing education to physicians 
and other allied health professionals. Programs 
for the lay person may be offered from time to 
time as they relate to continuing needs for medical 
education. These programs do not involve the 
award of University credit. 

This self sustaining trust fund will fund direct 
administrative services such as personnel, equipment 
supplies, program development costs, program coor- 
dination, printing of brochures and use of media as 
well as direct instructional costs. University of 
Massachusetts Medical School faculty will not re- 
ceive additional compensation for teaching in the 
program. 

The Chancellor of the Worcester campus is hereby 
delegated the authority to establish and modify from 
time to time at his discretion the fees and charges 
for said programs. 

VOTED : To abolish the Continuing Education (3-52000, 

0-19395) and the Oral Surgeons Conference (2-50020) 
Trust Funds and authorize the transfer of any 
balances remaining in said trust funds into the 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester Medical 
Education Trust Fund. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the final item, Fund 



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•18- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Transfers — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-061) . There being no discus- 
sion on the matter, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the fund transfers at the University of 
Massachusetts at Worcester as set forth in Trustee 
Document T7 7-061. 

Chairman Healey said that the meeting had been so dis- 
combobulated that he had neglected to do that which he should 
have done first — to welcome to the Board the new Trustees. This 
omission he proceeded to correct by welcoming Trustee McNulty, 
a member of the Northampton City Council, Trustee Marks, President 
of Concept Industries, and Trustee Crain, Treasurer of the New 
England Telephone Company. 

President Wood said he would forgo his comments, in 
view of the time, and asked the Chancellors to do the same. 
Chairman Healey then turned to the report of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 



4241 



Board 
2/2/77 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 



I 



I 



The first item of business was Faculty and Staff Com - 
pensation (Doc. T77-069) . He said the proposed vote authorized 
the Executive Committee to convene and approve appropriate salary 
adjustments. The issue had received extensive discussion at the 
Executive Committee meeting, which had been attended by most of the 
members of the Board. After reading the motion, Chairman Healey 
commented that this was an attempt on the part of the Executive 
Committee to ensure that the Board would not be in a position of 
having committed an unfair labor practice in view of the pending 
faculty collective bargaining election. Mr. Sulzner said that 
speaking for and representing faculty, he was sure they were dis- 
appointed with the form of the vote. They did not question the 
intent of the Board, that intent having been clearly explained in 
December. At that time, he said, he thought the Board's intent 
was to have a meeting in January and that this meeting would act 
to provide monetary compensation in terms at least analogous to 
the contracts with the classified unions presently before the 
Board. He also expressed his hope that the statement made earliejr 
in the Executive Committee was true; that following Board action 
on compensation, the money might be received by the constituency 
affected within a month or six weeks. Further, he said he wanted 
to be on the record as saying that he wouldn't be surprised if 
the faculty voted in a union. There being no further discussion, 
it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Executive Committee to convene 
at the call of the Chairman as soon as possible 
consistent with all pertinent laws in order to 
approve for non-union employees of the University, 
including faculty, professional staff and classified 
employees, such adjustments as are appropriate to 
all circumstances at that time. 



-19- 



Faculty and 
Staff Compen- 
sation 
(Doc. T77-069) 



4242 



Board 
2/2/77 

Approval of 
Collective 
Bargaining 
Agreements 
(Docs 
T77-062, 
T77-063, 
T77-064 and 
T77-068) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting had then turned to Approval of Collective 
Bargaining Agreements (Docs T77-062, T77-063, T77-064 and T77- 
068). In response to Trustee Crain's question, Mr. Skoler said 
the use of University property in conducting union business, as 
provided for in the agreements , was in consonance with the rules 
and regulations governing such matters issued by the Director of 
Personnel and Standardizations of the Commonwealth. There being 
no further discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED ; To approve the Agreement Between Trustees of the 

University of Massachusetts at Amherst and American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, 
AFL-CIO, State Council 41, Local No. 1776 (Doc. T77- 
062); provided, however, that no wage increases as 
specified in said Agreement shall become effective 
until the Governor has approved said Agreement and 
has transferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the salary 
increases provided by said Agreement. 

VOTED ; To approve the Agreement Between the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst and M.S.E.A. and U.M.E.A. 
Chapter of M.S.E.A. (Doc. T77-063) ; provided, how- 
ever, that no wage increases as specified in said 
Agreement shall become effective until the Governor 
has approved said Agreement and has transferred 
sufficient funds to the University's maintenance 
accounts to meet the cost of the salary increases 
provided by said Agreement. 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement Between the University of 
Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester and the 
American Federation of State, County and Municipal 
Employees, AFL-CIO, State Council 41, Local No. 1776 
(Doc T77-064) ; provided, however, that no wage in- 
creases as specified in said Agreement shall become 
effective until the Governor has approved said Agree 
ment and has transferred sufficient funds to the 
University's maintenance accounts to meet the cost 
of the salary increases provided by said Agreement. 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement Between the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston and the Maintenance Trades 
Council of New England, AFL-CIO (Doc. T77-068) ; 
provided, however, that no wage increases as speci- 
fied in said Agreement shall become effective until 
the Governor has approved said Agreement and has 
transferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the salary 
increases provided by said Agreement. 

The next item was Amendments to the Trustee By-laws 



-20- 



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4243 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

concerning Executive Sessions and the Committee on Health Affairs. 
Chairman Healey said that the Executive Committee had accepted 
two changes offered by Secretary Parks to the proposed amendment 
on Executive Sessions and recommended that the amended amendment 
be approved. After agreeing to an editorial change suggested by j 
Trustee Breyer, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED ; That the By-Laws of the Board of Trustees (Doc. T76- 
051A) be and hereby are amended by inserting after 
Section 5 of Article II the following new Section : 

" SECTION 6 . EXECUTIVE SESSIONS . By vote of a 
majority of the Trustees present at any meeting, 
the Board may enter into executive session, closec 
to the public. The vote shall be taken by roll 
call and the purpose of the session and the 
reasons why it is to be confidential shall be 
announced in advance of the vote. The presiding 
officer shall state before the executive session 
if the Board will reconvene after the executive 
session. The Board shall maintain accurate 
records of its executive sessions, setting forth 
the date, time, place, members present or absent 
and action taken at each executive session. The 
records of any executive session may remain secrelt 
as long as publication may defeat the lawful pur- 
poses of the executive session, but no longer. 
All votes taken in executive session shall be 
recorded votes and shall become a part of the 
record of said executive session. Upon request 
of any member of the Board, any vote taken in its 
executive session shall be verified by roll call 

Executive sessions may be held only for the 
following purposes : 

(1) to discuss the reputation and character, 
physical condition or mental health as 
well as the professional competence of 
an individual; 

(2) to consider the discipline or dismissal 
of, or to hear complaints or charges 
brought against an individual; 

(3) to discuss strategy with respect to 
collective bargaining or litigation if 
an open meeting may have a detrimental 
effect on the bargaining or litigating 
position of the university; 

(4) to discuss the deployment of security 
personnel or devices; 



-21- 



Board 
2/2/77 

Amendments to 
Trustee By-laws: 
Article II, 
Section 6, 
Executive 
Sessions ; 
Article III, 
Section 12, 
Health Affairs 
Committee 



4244 



Board 
2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(5) to consider allegations of criminal mis- 
conduct ; 



(6) to consider the purchase, exchange, lease 
or value of property or contracts if such 
discussions may have a detrimental effect 
on the negotiating position of the govern 
mental body and a person, firm or corpora 
tion; 

(7) to comply with the provisions of any 
general or specific law or federal grant- 
in-aid requirements ; 

(8) to consider the award of honorary degrees 
and other awards; 

(9) to consider the hiring or promotion of 
personnel. " 

VOTED : That the By-Laws of the Board of Trustees (Doc. T76- 
051A) be and hereby are amended by striking out 
Section 12 in Article III and inserting in place 
thereof the following new Section: 

" SECTION 12 . THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS . 
The Committee on Health Affairs shall review, 
consider, and make recommendations relative to 
all University health affairs matters , including 
but not limited to academic and other programs, 
health care delivery systems, and cooperative 
arrangements with public and private agencies, 
institutions, and other entities." 

In the matter of the proposed Act to Improve Statewide 
Oversight, Coordination and Planning for Higher Education, Chair- 
man Healey said the Executive Committee recommended that the 
Chairman appoint five Trustees to an ad hoc committee. After 
considering the proposed act, it would report to the Board. The 
Trustees agreed to this. 

UM/Worcester — In the matter of the Postponement of Review of Medical 

Medical Center Center By-laws — UM/Worcester , it was moved and seconded, and 
By-laws 

VOTED : That the vote of the Board on September 8, 1976, 
be and hereby is amended by striking the words 
"February 2, 1977" and inserting in place thereof 
the following: "the April, 1977 meeting of the 
Board 



Fair Infor- 
mation 
Practices 
Regulations 
(Doc. T77-059) 



The meeting then turned to the item Fair Information 
Practices Regulations (Doc. T77-059) . Counsel Searson said the 



•22- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

regulations, with the exception of a few minor amendments, were 
essentially the same as those approved by the Board in July, 
1976 (Doc. T77-005). President Wood said a question of student 
evaluations of instructors vis- a- vis the regulations had been 
raised. This matter would be studied. There being no further 
discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED ; To rescind the vote of the Board of Trustees on 

August 4, 1976, approving and adopting the Univer- 
sity's Interim Privacy and Confidentiality Regula- 
tions (Doc. T77-005) , and to approve and adopt in 
place thereof the University Fair Information Prac- 
tices Regulations (Doc. T77-059) ; further, to direct 
the campuses and the President's Office to prepare 
and publish simplified guidelines for the imple- 
mentation of the Regulations and for informing 
individuals of their rights and responsibilities 
under the Regulations. 

The last item on the Executive Committee agenda was 
Concurrence in the Appointment of Vice Chancellor for Administra- 



I 



tion and Finance — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-060) . Chairman Healey 
asked for discussion of the item. Trustee Crain said that as a 
businessman, he questioned the salary offered and the seemingly 
nomadic background of the appointee. Chancellor Bulger said the 
salary was within the range approved by the Board for this posi- 
tion and was in line with salaries in the field. In evaluating 
the individual, his previous job history had been thoroughly 
examined and the UM/Worcester administration was satisfied. There 
being no further discussion, it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To concur along with the President in the appoint- 
ment by the Chancellor of James R. Campbell as 
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance at 
the University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as 
set forth in Doc. T77-060. 

VOTED : To approve the personnel action as set forth in 
Trustee Document T77-067. 

Trustees Burack and Crain voted against both motions. 

Chairman Healey then recognized Trustee Troy who report- 
ed that the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy had met 
to consider and approve the February 1977 Graduation Lists — UM/ 
Amherst (Doc. T77-065) . There were 1246 graduates, including 
929 undergraduates and 317 graduates. Of the latter, 64 were 
Ph.D., 38 D.Ed., the rest Masters. There was no discussion and 
it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve and ratify the Graduation Lists of 
February 1, 1977, UM/Amherst, certified by the 



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2/2/77 



UM/ Worcester — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Vice Chancellor 
for Administra- 
tion and Finance 
(Doc. T77-060) 



UM/Amherst — 

February 1977 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T77-065) 



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2/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recorder of that campus and contained in Doc. 
T77-065. 

There was no further business to come before the meeting 
and it adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 






Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keii/h Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

March 2, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 
Whitmore Administration Building and Memorial Hall 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Conti, Crain, Cronin, 
Dennis, Eddy, Gordon, Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau. Robert- 
son, Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Sec- 
retary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Mr. Colby representing 
Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, 
recorder 

Absent Trustee: Trustee Okin 



:247 



Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mrs. Hanson, 
Assistant Vice President and Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General 
Counsel to the University 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Repre- 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



sentative 



Health Affairs; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty Representative; 
Dr. Catlin, Chairman, Department of Family Practice 

Invited Guests : Former Trustee Robert M. Abrams and Mrs. Abrams ; 
former Trustee Edmund J. Croce and Mrs. Croce; former Trustee 
Alan Shaler; Judy Baker, UM/Boston Student Trustee-elect 

The meeting was called to order at 10:20 a.m. in the 
third floor Board Room, Whitmore Administration Building. Chair- 
man Healey said that the meeting would immediately go into execu- 
tive session to discuss collective bargaining, after which it 
would recess for the purpose of moving to Memorial Hall, where it 
would reconvene in open session. At 10:22 a.m. it was moved, 
seconded, and on roll call unanimously 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss collective 
bargaining. 

At 12:25 p.m. it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 



Executive 
Session 



Board 
3/2/77 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Prior Meeting 



Resolution of 
Thanks and 
Appreciation 
to Dr. Robert 
M. Abrams 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED ; To recess for the purpose of moving to Memorial 
Hall. 

The meeting of the Board of Trustees reconvened in 
Memorial Hall at 12:55 p.m. Chairman Healey asked first for ap- 
proval of the minutes of the previous meeting and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
February 2, 1977. 

Chairman Healey said that it was with mixed emotions 
that he welcomed former Trustees Abrams, Croce and Shaler to the 
meeting, for he was indeed sorry to be saying goodbye to three 
people who had contributed so much to the Board, the University, 
and the Commonwealth. He welcomed also Mrs. Abrams and Mrs. 
Croce. 

Chairman Healey then called upon Trustee Gordon, who 
proposed the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted: 

"When he was appointed to the Board of Trustees in 
March, 1970, Bob Abrams already had established a 
reputation as a man deeply committed to serving the 
community in a broad range of civic activities. That 
commitment carried over into his service as a Trustee, 
and the Board, the University, and students are richer 
for it. 

"As a member of the Committee on Student Affairs for 
seven years, Dr. Abrams demonstrated a continuing 
concern for improving communication and understanding 
between students and Trustees. He believed that we 
had much to learn from students who sought active 
participation in the governance of their University, 
and he believed that if we took them seriously, the 
students in turn would come to a surer understanding 
of the responsibilities of the Board. 

"As a physician, Dr. Abrams brought his professional 
training and judgment to bear creatively on the devel- 
opment of the Medical Center. He served with distinction 
as a member of the Visiting Committee for the new Chan- 
cellor/Dean. And he was a founding member of the new 
Trustee Committee on Health Affairs. 

"For all this, and for his seven years of dedicated 
service to the Board and to the University, we are 
greatly in the debt of Bob Abrams." 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next called upon Trustee Troy, who 
proposed the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted: 

"From his appointment to the Board of Trustees in 
December, 1962, Ed Croce involved himself actively 
in every aspect of the Board's broad range of con- 
cerns. He served with enthusiasm on Committees on 
Athletics, Student Activities, Government and Uni- 
versity Relations, and Budget and Finance. As a 
physician, he brought his professional judgment and 
counsel to the Committees on Faculty and Educational 
Policy and on Buildings and Grounds. And most recently, 
his service as an at-large member of the Executive Com- 
mittee has allowed us to take fullest advantage of his 
experience and wisdom. 

"He also served as a founding member of the new Trustee 
Committee on Health Affairs. 

"Despite the heavy demands of his profession, he was 
unstinting in his efforts on behalf of the University. 
He participated in the work of the Visiting Committee 
to the Medical School and of the Chancellor/Dean 
Search Committee; his efforts to develop a first-class 
medical center in Worcester went far beyond the limits 
of any individual committee's responsibility. 

"We remember, too, his thoughtful essays reflecting his 
views of what the University of Massachusetts ought to 
be and ought to do. They helped us to a clearer view 
of this institution's responsibilities and of its poten- 
tial for service to the Commonwealth and its people. 

"We are grateful to Ed Croce for his 14 years of service 
on the Board, and we are confident that he will continue 
in retirement to provide us with his wise counsel and 
warm friendship for many years to come." 

Chairman Healey then called upon Trustee Shearer, who 
proposed the following resolution, which was also unanimously 
adopted: 

"The many contributions, great and small, Alan Shaler 
made to the University and to the Board during his 
seven years as a Trustee cannot be enumerated and will 
not be forgotten. Serving during a period of unprece- 
dented growth of the University and of disruptive 
turmoil in society, he fostered the former and perse- 
vered during the latter. 

"Alan served on so many committees and involved himself 
in so many matters that came to the Board that it might 



4249 



-3- 



Board 
3/2/77 

Resolution of 
Thanks and 
Appreciation 
to Dr. Edmund 
J. Croce 



Resolution of 
Thanks and 
Appreciation 
to Mr. Alan 
Shaler 



Board 
3/2/77 



Introduction 
of UM/Boston 
Student 
Trustee-elect 



Report of 
Committee 
on Budget 
and Finance 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



Extension of 
Freiburg 
Rental 
Agreement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be presumed difficult to discern what his major concern 
was. Such is not the case. The one thread that was 
consistent throughout his Trustee career was his deep 
concern for the students. It is possible that they 
may have had better friends, but they never had a more 
articulate spokesman. 

"Alan Shaler will be missed for many qualities, one of 
which is that he is a plainspoken man. Reading again 
some of the letters he has written concerning Board 
matters is pleasurable. On occasion, receiving them 
must have come as a distinct shock. The Board has lost 
something necessary." 

At the suggestion of Chairman Healey, the Board rose to 
give former Trustees Abrams , Croce and Shaler a standing ovation. 

Chairman Healey next recognized Trustee Conti, who 
introduced the Student Trustee-elect from the Boston Campus, Ms. 
Judy Baker. Trustee Conti said that Ms. Baker had been active on 
campus, and during the last semester had been a member of the 
Student Activities Committee. She said she felt the Board would 
enjoy working with Ms. Baker. 

Due to the length of the agenda and the time constraints 
on the members of the Board, President Wood said that he would 
waive his agenda and that the Chancellors would also abstain from 
comment. He said he did wish, however, to express his personal 
thanks and appreciation to Dr. Abrams, Dr. Croce and Mr. Shaler. 

Chairman Healey then asked for the report of the Commit- 
tee on Budget and Finance. Trustee Carlson reported that the 
Committee had met on February 23 primarily to discuss the mid- 
year status report of the University budget and the FY 1978 budget 
of the University Hospital, but had also considered at that time 
a number of housekeeping items. He said he would report first on 
these items and then ask for discussion of the budgets. 

The Committee, he said, had first heard a report on the 
Endowment Portfolio from Investment Counsel, followed by their 
recommendation for several changes in the Endowment Fund. At the 
conclusion of discussion of the recommendation, the Committee 
voted to authorize the Treasurer to execute the necessary sales 
and purchases of securities. 

The next item of agenda, he said, was the Extension of 
Freiburg Rental Agreement , a request by the Amherst Campus for a 
two-year extension of a lease for the University Center in Frei- 
burg, Germany. Since the terms were quite favorable, he said, 
the Committee recommended approval of the agreement, and on motion 
made and seconded, it was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer of the University 
to execute a two year extension of the lease 
for the University of Massachusetts Center in 
Freiburg, Germany, until June 30, 1979; provided 
however, that the monthly rental and incidental 
expenses specified in said lease do not exceed 
DM 700 for the year commencing July 1, 1977, and 
DM 750 for the year commencing July 1, 1978. 

The next matter discussed by the Committee, he said, 
was the rescinding of obsolete Trustee votes. He explained that 
at the February Board meeting a new delegation of authority to 
the Treasurer's Office had been approved by the Board and it now 
seemed appropriate to rescind several obsolete votes. On motion, 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the following seven votes of the Board of 
Trustees be and hereby are rescinded. 

Trustee Vote of October 19, 1963: 

VOTED : To authorize Robert H. Brand, Associate Treasurer 
of the University of Massachusetts, as directed 
by the Treasurer, or in his absence, to sign or 
endorse in the name of the University of Massachu- 
setts or the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts such official documents, 
vouchers, including checks, drafts, certificates 
of deposit and withdrawal orders, as require 
the signature of the financial officer of the 
University provided that all checks, drafts, 
certificates of deposit and withdrawal orders 
in an amount of $10,000 or more shall require 
the additional signature of either the Treasurer 
or the Controller except fund transfers between 
accounts in the First National Bank of Amherst. 

Trustee Vote of October 7, 1971: 

VOTED : To authorize Ray E. Heiney, Jr., Assistant 

Treasurer (of the) University of Massachusetts, 
as directed by the Treasurer or in his absence, 
to sign or endorse in the name of the University 
of Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts such official docu- 
ments, contracts and vouchers, including checks, 
drafts, certificates of deposit, letters of 
credit, advances from the State Treasurer and 
withdrawal orders, as require the signature of 



Board 
3/2/77 



Recission of 
Obsolete 
Delegations of 
Authority 



-5- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the financial officer of the University pro- 
vided that all checks, drafts, certificates 
of deposit, letters of credit and withdrawal 
orders in an amount of $10,000 or more shall 
require the additional signature of either 
the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, or the Associate Treasurer, Robert 
H. Brand, or Donald W. Cadigan, Treasurer's 
Office. 



i 



Trustee Vote of October 22, 1966: 



VOTED : That the following officers of the University 
of Massachusetts are each authorized, in their 
capacities as officers, to sign and execute 
singly and without any co-signature, any and 
all documents and instruments relating to expend- 
itures of funds, requests for funds, vouchers, 
warrents, schedules, invoices, certificates and 
also all documents and instruments of every 
nature and kind as all the aforesaid may from 
time to time be required to be drawn or executed 
under the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 75, 
Section 8: 

John W. Lederle, President 
Robert J. McCartney, Secretary 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
Robert H. Brand, Associate Treasurer 
L. Lawrence Taylor, Controller 
William H. Maus , Assistant Controller 



I 



Trustee Vote of January 16, 1963: 

VOTED : That all checks, drafts, or money orders rep- 
resenting disbursements from funds under the 
control of the Trustees payable in an amount 
of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) and over 
except checks representing transfers of funds 
between accounts (funds) in the First National 
Bank of Amherst shall bear the handwritten sig- 
natures of any two of the following three 
officers : 

Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 
Associate Treasurer, William G. Thaler 
Controller, L. Lawrence Taylor 



and provided further that the Secretary is 
instructed to transmit a certified copy of this 
vote to all banks in which the University main- 
tains funds and to the State Comptroller, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer and Receiver General, and the State 
Auditor. 



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Trustee Vote of April 26, 1965: 

VOTED : That the President John W. Lederle be authorized 
to submit proposals for Federal grants, and that 
the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
be authorized to execute agreements under the pro- 
visions of the Higher Education Facilities Act of 
1963 and other Federal statutes granting funds 
for construction of buildings, facilities and 
equipment. 

Trustee Vote of August 2, 1962: 

VOTED : That the responsibility and authority for the 
negotiation, execution and administration of 
classified contracts is assigned to the following 
officers of the University: John W. Lederle, 
President; Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; John 
W. Ryan, Secretary. 

Trustee Vote of June 15, 1961: 

VOTED : To authorize William G. Thaler, Assistant 

Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
as directed by the Treasurer, or in his absence, 
to sign or endorse in the name of the University 
of Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts such official documents 
and vouchers, including checks, drafts, certifi- 
cates of deposit and withdrawal orders, as require 
the signature of the financial officer of the 
University. 

The Committee, he said, next reviewed the Mid-year 
Status Report on University Budget (Doc. T77-073). The UM/ 
Amherst review revealed a relatively stable program status, the 
only major transfers being $1.2 million from the 01 to the 03 
account to retain maximum flexibility in staffing commitments in 
the face of continued uncertainty of annual appropriations by 
the Legislature and a reduction of $550,000 in the 08 account, 
offset by an increase in the 12 account, to allow for replacement 
of maintenance materials. 

The only transfers for UM/Boston, he said, was $70,000 
from the 08 account to the 01 account to cover part of the bonus 
portion of the cost-of-living increases. The Boston report, like 
the Amherst report, stressed the vital importance of meeting 



-7- 



Board 
3/2/77 



Mid-year 
Status on 
University 
Budget and 
Mid-year Fund 
Transfers 
(Doc. T77-073, 
Doc. T77-077) 



1 



4&54 



Board 
3/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Review of 
Current 

Hospital 
Requirements 
(Doc. T77-074, 



enrollment and program goals and the difficulty of doing this 
if the Legislature fails for any reason to vote the funds in the 
FY 1978 request. 

In addressing the UM/Worcester transfers, much of the 
discussion, continued Trustee Carlson, revolved around the defi- 
ciency request being made by the Worcester Campus for the Teachin 
Hospital. He said he would like to consider this in conjunction 
with the entire problem of the Teaching Hospital. Therefore, he 
requested action at this time only on the transfers, most of which 
were minor, except for a transfer from the 01 to the 03 account, 
which is explained in Table 4 of Chancellor Bulger's letter. He 
said the Committee also heard reports for the President's Office 
and the Institute for Governmental Services as well as Common 
Services. He said he would like to request approval of the trans- 
fers before proceeding with a discussion of the Teaching Hospital 
needs. Professor Sulzner noted that there were 63 fewer faculty 
positions in June 1977 than in June 1976 and asked if the 63 
fewer faculty positions were the result of normal attrition or 
the result of faculty departures due to the political and finan- 
cial climate. Chancellor Bromery replied that a significant 
number were the result of the latter. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To approve the subsidiary account transfers 
as detailed in Doc. T77-077. 



Trustee Carlson turned next to the Review of Current 
Hospital Requirements (Doc. T77-074) and the very difficult prob 
lem of the Worcester Campus in its attempt to provide a viable 
institution fulfulling both the teaching mission of the Medical 
campus and its commitment to health care delivery. He said that 
Doc. T77-073) because of the somewhat unprecedented request for a 50 percent 

increase in the FY 1978 maintenance budget previously submitted, 
this matter warranted a thorough discussion by the Trustees and 
in particular an understanding of the long-term implications of 
the recommended action. 

He said the deficiency request for FY 1977 and the 
revision proposed to the FY 1978 request were part of the same 
problem; namely, the need to realistically address the long- 
range minimization of cost to the Commonwealth. This problem is 
the result, he said, of three factors. First, earlier budgets 
were drawn up with the well-intended aim of minimizing the impac 
of the growth of the Worcester Medical Center budget on the tota!. 
University budget, at a time when the campus was in a start-up 
phase. This resulted in some savings in the short run, but if 
allowed to continue would lead to insurmountable difficulties 
for the Medical Center in future years. Second, he said, it is 
impossible to look at the budgets of a new institution of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

complexity of the Medical Center on a year-to-year basis. He 
said, just because annual budgeting is the way in which the agen- 
cies of the Commonwealth are required to do their budgeting does 
not justify continuing an unviable practice. In order to make 
sense out of any one year's budget, he urged, it is necessary to 
look at the needs of the Hospital on a multi-year basis and pro- 
ject these needs into the future. Third, he said, there must be 
a recognition of the importance of charges for hospital services 
in determining the true net cost of the Medical Center to the 
taxpayers. He said he was aware of the resistance in the Common- 
wealth and in the nation to rising charges for medical services; 
however, he said, it is absolutely essential to the future sound- 
ness of the Medical Center that its charges be adjusted upward 
from time to time to reflect the increasing complexity of the 
services it provides, to miminize a situation where the taxpayers 
of the Commonwealth are subsidizing third-party payers such as 
insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid. 

Trustee Carlson said he felt it was now time to meet 
these issues head on and that failure to do so would probably 
lead to only a single alternative, the progressive withering away 
of the outstandingly successful programs already in place and 
possibly the closing of the Hospital, and perhaps even the closing 
of the Medical School itself. He said the document received by 
the Trustees presented a well-reasoned statement of the problem 
and the proposed solutions. He said that when he received the 
news that a 50 percent increase in the FY 1978 budget was neces- 
sary, he arranged to spend a day and a half at the Worcester Cam- 
pus with campus administrative personnel, the University's budget 
director and the Vice President for Management and Business Af- 
fairs. In addition to University personnel, he said, Dr. Edward 
Andrews, President of the Portland Medical Center, former Presi- 
dent of the University of Vermont and former Dean of the Medical 
School there, and the financial officer of the Portland Medical 
Center, had also been invited to participate in discussions at 
the campus. He said that after thoroughly reviewing this problem, 
they had come to the conclusion that Doc. T77-074 represented the 
most responsive and comprehensive approach to the solution that 
could be found to this matter. 

The key to the problem, he said, must be found in the 
commitment made by the Board of Trustees and the Legislature 
some ten years ago to the concept of publicly supported medical 
education in Massachusetts. He stated his belief that there was 
no viable alternative to supporting the actions proposed in the 
document. In his judgment, he said, it is no longer possible to 
submit a budget that could be "lived with" for a year; it is nec- 
essary to face the fact that good medical education is expensive 
and will become more expensive as medical science and technology 
advance. Trustee Carlson said he believes that the campus now 
has good administration and that costs can be kept within reason- 
able bounds. To conclude, he said, he would like by use of 
slides to run through the key assumptions and financial high- 
lights of the proposal. 



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4255 



Board 
3/2/77 



4256 



Board 
3/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Carlson turned first to a chart of the revised 
revenue projections for FY 1977, indicating that although the 
revised revenue projections were down a little from the original 
estimate, the lower revenue was counteracted by fewer anticipated 
bad debts. The cash shortfall is the result of an increase in 
receivables caused by the slowness of payment by third-party payers 
The deficiency request, he said, reflects the impact of opening 
twenty new beds and unanticipated or underestimated expenses. 

The revised budget for FY 1977, he said, resulted in 
only a slightly greater net cost figured on an accrual basis. 

Of the $794,000 deficiency request, he said, the table 
shows that this money is concentrated in three accounts - 01, 07 
and 08. It represents major unanticipated expenses such as addi- 
tional supplies required because of the acuity of illness of 
patients admitted to the hospital, additional utility costs due 
to the severity of the winter and funding part of the cost-of- 
living settlement. Of the approximately $1.2 million gross defi- 
cit, about half that amount is due to factors beyond the control 
of the University. He continued by explaining that although the 
gross deficit totals $1,233,500, real dollar savings of $598,500 
make a net projected deficit of $635,000. This figure does not 
include the cost of opening twenty new beds, $159,000, making a 
total deficiency request of $794,000. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the FY 1978 budget re- 
quest, stating that discussion of this request was based on three 
fundamental concepts: 

1) that the Hospital is essential to the total operation 
of the Medical School; 

2) that the quality of clinical teaching is dependent 
upon the opening of a sufficient number of beds; and 

3) that expense per patient day can be reduced as the 
number of beds is increased. 



He stressed that although the revised FY 1978 budget request for 
the Hospital projected both an increase in personnel and an in- 
crease in beds , on an accrual basis the net cost to the Common- 
wealth would actually decrease. He said that it was important to 
note that although the original budget projected 130 beds, the ap- 
propriation in fact could only support 85 beds. 

Trustee Carlson, referring to the text of Doc. T77-074, 
pointed out the two-fold mission of the Medical Center: 

a) to produce well-trained physicians and other health 
professionals for the Commonwealth, particularly 
primary care practitioners in the fields of family 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

practice, internal medicine and pediatrics, and 

b) to improve the quality and accessibility of health 
care services throughout the Commonwealth. 

He emphasized that good clinical teaching was dependent upon the 
presence on the faculty of specialists. Furthermore, he said, if 
the hospital is to fulfill its commitment to the Commonwealth to 
improve the quality and accessibility of health care services, 
then it must be allowed to grow. Without growth in bed capacity, 
he added, it cannot become self-sustaining. 

Trustee Carlson next turned to the matter of hospital 
charges and the misconception that "rate" means "cost." Hospital 
rates are charges for services rendered and should be borne by 
the users of the services. However, since charges do not cover 
costs, the difference must be made up from other sources. He 
said that unless rates are increased in June, the Commonwealth 
will be subsidizing third-party payers. 

He said it is assumed that the Hospital would always 
present a net cost to the Commonwealth, but that the request to 
increase the bed capacity to 175 beds would result in a reduced 
net cost. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the projected receipts 
and expenditures through FY 1980, indicating that the net cost 
on an accrual basis would peak in 1978 and on a cash basis in 
1979. It is expected that by 1979 the State subsidy will be well 
below the national average for state-supported University-owned 
teaching hospitals, which is now about 21 percent. He then went 
on to explain the implications of level funding. Level funding 
was an impossibility because it would mean an actual decrease in 
programs. Without an expansion of clinical programs in the Hospi 
tal there would be little to attract or retain clinical faculty. 
Level funding would only support approximately 55 beds. The 
minimum acceptable ratio of teaching beds per student is 4:1, and 
as the Medical School enrollment grows to its projected capacity, 
there is no assurance that the required number of beds can be 
provided by the community hospitals. He added that the quality 
of clinical instruction of those beds in other hospitals is an 
important consideration and is less controllable without a strong 
teaching hospital. 

Trustee Carlson pointed out that only $3.6 million of 
the proposed $8 million increase for FY 1978 was the result of 
program increases. The remainder was the result of fixed cost 
adjustments to the estimated expenditures for FY 1977. The major 
program increases, he said, were in the 01 and 07 accounts, per- 
manent salaries and medical supplies. 

Trustee Carlson next re-emphasized that one of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

reasons why there was a need for a deficiency request was the 
acuity of illness of the patients admitted to the Hospital. In 
August, 35 percent of the patients admitted had acute illnesses. 
In January that percentage had jumped to 60 percent. Because of 
this fact, the expenditure for medical supplies had increased, an 
unanticipated factor. Secretary Parks asked if these expenses 
were recoverable. Trustee Carlson replied that if the rates 
charged covered the cost, then the expenses were legally recover- 
able. Dr. Caper added that 07 expenses were fully recoverable. 

Trustee Crain suggested that the cost of service to 
patients in other state institutions be separated from other re- 
ceivables since this figure was an additional cost to the State. 

Secretary Parks then asked for confirmation that the 

greater or more serious the illness, the greater the cost for pro 

viding services to the patient. Trustee Carlson confirmed this 
fact . 

Trustee Carlson then called attention to the five-year 
projection of Hospital expenditures by subsidiary accounts, and 
the revised FY 1978 budget request indicating changes by program 
area. He concluded his presentation by showing a chart which 
indicated the diminishing net cost to the Commonwealth as the 
Hospital expands and which indicated that free care, bad debts 
and subsidies to third-party insurers were responsible for a 
greater percent of the net cost than were educational costs, and 
that both diminished as the cash receipts and receivables grew. 

Trustee Crain questioned the projected rate increases 
in the face of national and state trends to keep health care 
costs down. Mr. Fellner replied that Chapter 409 of the Laws of 
the Commonwealth recognizes the right of hospitals to set prices 
for their services which are approximately five percent greater 
than their costs. 

Trustee Carlson said that the projections are the best 
that can be provided at this time; however, he added, it might be 
wise to consider the possibility of separating the Hospital budget 
from the educational budget of the University. Concluding his 
report of the Committee on Budget and Finance, he made the follow- 
ing motions: 

MOVED : To approve the submission of a FY 77 deficiency 

budget request for the University Hospital (7411- 
1006) in the amount of $794,000, distributed 
among the subsidiary accounts as follows: 



01 


$283,000 


07 


311,000 


08 


200,000 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MOVED: To approve the revised FY 78 Maintenance Budget 
Request for the University Hospital (7411-1006) 
as set forth in Doc. T77-074. 

Chairman Healey thanked Trustee Carlson for his excel- 
lent presentation and Kay Hanson, Budget Director, for the thor- 
oughness of the staff work on this report. 

President Wood said he wanted to highlight three factors 
first, it has been found that the level of the patient demand is 
higher than the original projections. The location of the Hos- 
pital in Worcester beyond the perimeter of 128, the impact of the 
Foley bill, and the enthusiastic attitude of the physicians in 
the area have been contributing factors to the impetus of high 
patient demand for beds at the Hospital; second, he said, he had 
no reservations about the quality of the Medical Center, both in 
the Hospital and in its teaching capacity. He said that the 
Medical School had already attracted national attention. He then 
quoted a statement from John Bowers, President of the Macy Founda- 
tion, who had recently visited the Medical Center: 

"My major impression is, to use the words of a distin- 
guished leader of medicine and public health in Boston 
with whom I had luncheon today, 'If you wish to receive 
excellent training in primary care and family medicine, 
the place to go is the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School. *" 

President Wood said that there is no longer a question of whether 
there are patients, whether there is quality or what the philos- 
ophy should be. Third, he said, clearly it is now necessary to 
address the matter of revenue and the fiscal base of the Hospital, 
He and the Secretary of Educational Affairs had discussed and he 
hoped would continue to discuss the possibilities of "decoupling" 
of the Hospital from the Medical Center in fiscal matters. A 
task force is currently addressing itself to this matter. In the 
meantime, the deficiency request for this year and the increase 
for the FY 1978 Hospital budget is being presented after thorough 
review and exploration of options. 

Mrs. Blues tone, speaking for Trustee Fielding, said that 
the "founding fathers," in making the Commissioner of Public 
Health an ex officio member of the Board, must have hoped that 
the Board would have the advantage of his expertise. She said 
she wished to separate the discussion of the deficiency, which is 
where we have been, from the FY 1978 request, which is where we 
are going. She stated concern that a deficiency of this size 
had not come to the attention of the Board previous to the mid- 
year review. She called attention to the fact that had the Hos- 
pital not received a substantial rate increase, the deficit would 
have been even greater, as much as $1.2 million. She urged the 
Board to consider the seriousness of submitting such a large 



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y 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

deficiency request to the Legislature. She said that one of the 

State hospitals in the Department of Public Health has a deficiency 

in its 07 account, but it was not permitted to forward its defi- 
ciency request to the Legislature. 



With regard to the FY 1978 budget, Mrs. Blues tone said 
many major policy issues were involved. She said although she 
recognized that more beds must be made available in the Hospital, 
she thought the Board should be aware that the Worcester area 
presently had more beds per person than any other part of the 
State with the exception of the City of Boston; therefore, it was 
important how the University proceeded in the opening of beds. 
She said poor management decisions made in the past have come 
back to haunt the University. She felt there were still questions 
unanswered in the documentation. 

Trustee Carlson responded to Mrs. Bluestone, saying he 
shared some of her concerns, however, he believed that the prob- 
lem has been in budgets in the past and not a matter of poor 
management at the Medical Center. He said he saw no point in 
dwelling on the past since this would be of no help in solving 
the current problem. The problem, whatever the cause, must now 
be solved so that the Medical Center can move into the future on 
sound footing. 

The meeting recessed at 2:00 p.m. for lunch and recon- 
vened at 3:30 p.m., at which time discussion on the Teaching Hos- 
pital resumed. 

Chairman Healey recognized Secretary Parks, who said 
that the Governor had given him a mandate to maintain level fund- 
ing. He said when one part of the budget increased, another part, 
therefore, must go down. He said he was concerned about the 
30,000 students in the community colleges. He was also concerned 
for the state colleges. He said that $32 million had been set 
aside for salary adjustments this year, but that next year any in- 
creases in salary would have to be absorbed in the operating budg- 
ets of the institutions. The Hospital budget resulted in a dis- 
tortion of the State's education budget. He said that teaching 
hospitals represented the most expensive kind of medical delivery 
and that costs would continue to rise. He, therefore, requested 
that the Board of Trustees make every effort to separate the Hos- 
pital budget from the education budget of the State, so as to 
reduce the conflict with the other segments of higher education 
and because education cannot afford to carry the Hospital. How- 
ever, he said, the Medical School and Hospital are a fait accompli 
and he would like to see them dealt with in a better budgetary 
format than the present manner. 

Trustee Breyer commented that if he were solely to vote 
as a taxpayer of the Commonwealth, assuming that the Hospital 
would be granted rate increases in the future, he would have to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

vote for the revised budget because the increased bed capacity 
would reduce the net deficit and this would result in a saving 
to the taxpayer. Secretary Parks said he could not concur and 
that he would vote against both the deficiency request for FY 
1977 and the revised FY 1978 budget request. 

Trustee Burack asked the President what the time frame 
would be for the fiscal separation of the Hospital from the re- 
mainder of the University budget. President Wood said that in 
1975 he had filed legislation for the operation of the Hospital 
as a separate trust fund. He said he hoped Secretary Parks might 
be persuaded to abstain from the vote at the present time, as an 
attempt is made to work toward the separation of the Hospital fron 
the education budget. He said he would like to file legislation 
to accomplish this. He said the Commonwealth could either condemn 
the Hospital to a continuing inefficient operation with all the 
dangers inherent in that situation to the viability of the Medical 
School, or it could provide the funding which would allow it to 
become a quality institution for health care delivery and medical 
education with an excellent faculty. 

Trustee Crain said he, too, was in favor of uncoupling 
the Hospital from the University budget. However, he said, he 
could not reconcile the statement that there was a higher rate of 
acutely ill patients with the fact that the average stay in the 
Hospital had actually gone down. The deficiency request repre- 
sents a 13 percent increase while the patient/day figure is lower. 
With regard to the FY 1978 budget, he said he believed that the 
revenue projections were Utopian. He said he believed it would 
be very difficult to obtain rate increases. He said he could not 
reconcile the statement that 50 percent of the revenues would be 
borne by the carriers. 

Trustee Breyer said he thought the statement that the 
revenue projections were Utopian were arguable. He said it is an 
established rate-setting practice which recognizes that costs can 
be passed on to users. He said that although he cannot be certair 
about the numbers, a decision must be made; and he said he was 
reasonably sure that a 175-bed hospital would be more cost effec- 
tive than an 85-bed hospital. 



Professor Smith, speaking for the faculty at UM/Worcestdr 
said that many of the members are disconsolate. Many of the clin- 
ical faculty joined the Medical School with the understanding that 
they would be developing programs. There has not been funding 
for these programs. There has not been money available to buy 
books for the library or to repair equipment. This has been true, 
also, of the other campuses, she said, but one thing peculiar to 
the Medical School is its dependence on the Teaching Hospital. 
She said the growth of the Hospital cannot be separated from the 
growth of the Medical School. Many specialties have not yet been 



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3/2/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

provided at the School; many clinical faculty have no backup staff 
It is going to be difficult to retain good faculty, she said, as 
clinical faculty have a larger opportunity for mobility. The 
clinical faculty, she said, cannot get their patients admitted 
to the Hospital because there are no beds available. The 
faculty is put in the position of having to bargain for beds. 
They are unable to refer their patients to other specialists in 
the Hospital. The greatest tragedy, she said, is that the vast 
majority of students do not have an opportunity to see medical 
care delivered in the controlled environment of the Teaching Hos- 
pital. They don't have the opportunity to interact with the very 
fine clinical faculty there because so much of the clinical teach- 
ing must take place outside of the Teaching Hospital. The only 
way this situation can improve is to open more beds. 

Professor Smith then introduced Dr. Robin Catlin, 
Chairman, Department of Family Practice, who is also the acting 
chairman of the UM/Worcester Faculty Council. Dr. Catlin said 
that the existence of a tertiary care hospital is absolutely 
vital to training in primary care medicine. The morale of the 
faculty is very low, and that, he said, is a disaster from the 
viewpoint of training people for primary care. It would be ter- 
rible, he added, if the Medical Center lost its specialists be- 
cause of the inability to grow and develop needed programs. He 
said he thinks there is some confusion about the need for beds 
in the Teaching Hospital. He said the fact that there are beds 
in other hospitals does not mean that these beds are appropriate 
for the use of clinical faculty for the purposes of teaching. 

Trustee Dennis said that most of the Trustees want to 
see the Hospital opened, but he is not convinced that the revenue 
will be forthcoming. 

President Wood said that with regard to the revenue 
projections, he could only rely on the best judgments of experts 
in the field. He said that there is a monthly monitoring process 
of the revenue picture at the Hospital. 

Trustee Marks asked if he might inject a couple of 
gloomy notes. He said his instincts tell him that there will 
be a revenue problem. He said with regard to the uncoupling of 
the Hospital, that there are dangers there too. He said this 
would not change the philosophy of level funding. However, it 
would then cease to cloud the other issues of the educational 
budget. He is not sure that this would be helpful to the Hospi- 
tal. President Wood said that he does not feel that anyone would 
wish to take an action which would result in the closing of the 
Hospital. 

Chairman Healey said that it is difficult to say how 
solid the revenue projections are, but the larger consideration 
is that the Medical School and the Hospital now exist as a de- 



-16- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

clared policy of the Commonwealth. This is the first Governor in 
his memory who has put the State's tax situation in focus. He 
said he was in sympathy with the Governor, who is working very 
hard to make the Commonwealth fiscally stable. However, he con- 
tinued, in terms of the potential destruction of the Medical 
Center and in terms of the educational issues and commitments of 
the Board and of the Commonwealth to provide public medical educa- 
tion, he believed there was no choice but to support the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Budget and Finance for the deficienqy 
request and the increase in the FY 1978 budget. 

Trustee Crain said as a new Trustee he was concerned 
about his own credibility. He said he agreed that revenue pro- 
jections were difficult, but he felt that several assumptions 
were on the high side. He said that he did not believe he should 
have no alternative other than the recommendation before the 
Board. He said, therefore, he could not vote for it and he was 
in favor of the uncoupling of the Hospital from the budget. 

Secretary Parks said he would vote against the recom- 
mendation and would continue to vote against recommendations for 
increased funding of the Hospital until such time as there was a 
plan which would resolve the problem. He said he did not wish 
to see a health facility destroyed. He said that the Legislature 
and the Governor were "getting closer together" because of the 
present income and tax situation in the Commonwealth. He expresse 
the view that a solution to the problem of the Hospital should be 
found before further action was taken. 



Trustee Robertson said he felt there were three major 
assumptions to be made: 1) there is a clear educational need 
for the Hospital, 2) the Hospital is providing much needed serv- 
ices to the State; e.g., at Belcher town, Monson and Pondville stat 
hospitals, and 3) the facility operating at capacity will be of 
less cost to the Commonwealth than it would be operating with a 
few beds. He is totally in accord with the separation of the 
Hospital budget from the rest of the education budget. However, 
until that can be done, it is necessary to understand what the 
alternatives are and what the consequences of those alternatives 
will be. He said he felt if it were possible to uncouple the 
Hospital at the present time, the Board would all be in favor of 
it. But it is not possible. Therefore, the Board must do what- 
ever is best for the Hospital until such time as it can be sepa- 
rated from the University and the education budget. Looking at 
the alternatives, he said, he is in favor of approving the recom- 
mendation which will cost the Commonwealth the least, which is 
to approve the FY 1977 deficiency and the revised FY 1978 requests 

Chancellor Bulger said that most state-owned university 
hospitals have difficulty in getting patients to come in. He saic 
he was surprised by the numbers of patients who are coming to 
the Hospital. He said there are many hospitals that would be 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

extremely happy to have this problem. He said that there is a 
great opportunity for the Commonwealth in this phenomenon. The 
patients are there, but the beds are not. He said he understood 
the difficulty of making such a decision, especially for those 
who are not familiar with the health field. Responding to the 
questions with regard to the data submitted, Chancellor Bulger 
explained that the estimated length of stay in the Hospital was 
based on experience in other teaching hospitals around the country. 
He said the reason why the Hospital has a shorter patient day witt 
a higher percent of acuity of illness is because of the limited 
number of beds. The physicians have an incentive to discharge 
their patients at the earliest opportunity. He said they even 
make rounds in the evening in order to discharge patients to make 
the most efficient use of beds. He said that the Rate Setting 
Commission had found the data presented by the Medical Center 
adequate and acceptable to grant the requested rate increase. 
He said they were health professionals and they had not questioned 
the figures. 

There being no further discussion, the motion made 
earlier was seconded and it was 



VOTED : 



To approve the submission of a FY 77 deficiency 
budget request for the University Hospital (7411- 
1006) in the amount of $794,000, distributed 
among the subsidiary accounts as follows: 



01 


$283,000 


07 


311,000 


08 


200,000 



Trustees Crain and McNulty, Mrs. Bluestone representing Commis- 
sioner Fielding, and Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 
voted in opposition to the motion. 

It was then seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the revised FY 78 Maintenance Budget 
Request for the University Hospital (7411-1006) 
as set forth in Doc. T77-074. 

Trustees Crain, Dennis and McNulty, Mrs. Bluestone representing 
Commissioner Fielding, and Secretary Parks representing Trustee 
Dukakis voted in opposition to the motion. 

Because of the lateness of the hour, Chairman Healey 
said that the reports of the standing committees would not be 
given and referred Trustees to the minutes of the committee meet- 
ings which were included in their Board portfolios. He then 
asked for action on the following recommendations. 

The Committee on Health Affairs, he said, had recom- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

mended postponement of the Review of Medical Center By-laws — UM/ 
Worcester. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To change the date for submission of revision 
of the Medical Center By-laws to June, 1977. 

The Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy had 
recommended that the Board of Trustees accept the invitation to 
join the Boston Library Consortium. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To accept the invitation that the University 
Library of the Amherst Campus join the Boston 
Library Consortium as a founding member. 

The Committee had also made two tenure recommendations for fac- 
ulty at UM/Amherst. On motion made and seconded, it was 



Q-JCk)*} 



VOTED: 



To concur in the promotion by the President 
of Dr. Richard Ellis to Associate Professor 
of Mathematics and Statistics with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
as detailed in Doc. T77-072. 



and further 



VOTED : 



To concur in the appointment by the President 
of Dr. Edwin L. Thomas as Associate Professor 
of Polymer Science and Engineering with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
as detailed in Doc. T77-071. 



Trustee Burack voted in opposition to both tenure actions, asking 
that the record show that she was not voting against the individ- 
uals involved, but because she was opposed to the granting of 
tenure on early appointment as a matter of policy. 

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds, he said, had 
recommended an action with regard to Sitework — UM/Worcester (Doc. 
T77-070) . On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the site plans for the development of the 

Medical Center be amended to include the develop- 
ment of additional surface lots within the parimeter 
road system; further, that the need for a parking 
structure be re-examined in the light of further 
growth of the Medical Center and its surrounding 
area. 

Trustee Rowland requested that her report of the Commit- 
tee on Long- Range Planning be circulated to the Trustees. 



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Medical Center 
By-laws 



UM/Amherst — 
Boston Library 
Consortium 

UM/Amherst — 
Promotion of 
Dr . Richard 
Ellis to Asso- 
ciate Professor 
of Mathematics 
and Statistics 
with tenure 
(Doc. T77-072) 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Dr . Edwin L . 
Thomas as Asso- 
ciate Professor 
of Polymer 
Science and 
Engineering 
with tenure 
(Doc. T77-071) 

UM/ Worcester — 
Sitework 
(Doc. T77-070) 



4266 



Board 
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Appeal of 
Collective 
Bargaining 
Unit Deter- 
mination 



Request to 
Governor with 
respect to 
Collective 
Bargaining 
Contracts and 
other Salary 
Adjustments 



UM/Amherst — 
Collective 
Bargaining 
Agreement with 
International 
Brotherhood of 
Police Officers 
(Doc. T77-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey then announced the actions taken at the 
executive session of the Board earlier in the day. With respect 
to Collective Bargaining, he said, the Board of Trustees had voted 
as follows: 

To direct the President to appeal the unit 
determination decision of the State Labor 
Relations Commission with respect to the 
inclusion in the bargaining unit of Chairmen, 
part-time faculty, visiting faculty, and non- 
state funded faculty. 

Trustees Burack and Conti, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding, and Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis voted 
in opposition to the motion. 

Chairman Healey said he wanted to emphasize that this action rep- 
resented the deep concern of the Board of Trustees with respect 
to the composition of the bargaining unit which will be faced, it 
seemed, for a long time to come. This action, he said, was not 
taken with any intention to delay the bargaining process, and he 
hoped that an agreement could be reached which would be in the 
best interests of the University and the faculty. 



He said the Board had then also passed a resolution as 



follows : 



Whereas the Board of Trustees desires to provide 
appropriate salary adjustments to professional 
and non-professional staff of the University, 
and whereas sufficient funds for such salary 
adjustments require appropriation by the General 
Court upon recommendation by the Governor; now, 
therefore, the Board of Trustees requests the 
Governor to make such required recommendations 
and to take all other necessary steps to provide 
the necessary funds to implement the collective 
bargaining contracts approved by the Board of 
Trustees and to grant salary adjustments to other 
University personnel. 

Concluding his announcements about the executive ses- 
sion, he said the last matter of business before the Board was 
the approval of the Collective Bargaining Agreement: Local 432 , 
Unit A, The International Brotherhood of Police Officers — UM/ 
Amherst (Doc. T77-076) . On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement Between Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts and Local 432, Unit 
A, The International Brotherhood of Police Officers 
(Doc. T77-076) ; provided, however, that no wage 
increases as specified in said Agreement shall 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

become effective until the Governor had approved 
said Agreement and has transferred sufficient 
funds to the University's maintenance accounts to 
meet the cost of the salary increases provided by 
said Agreement. 

Secretary Parks asked to be recognized and publicly 
thanked Chancellor Bromery and the Amherst campus for the hospi- 
tality extended to himself and the Governor during their recent 
stay on campus. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 




^JuUi 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



NOT USED 



I 



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ATTENDANCE: 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April 6, 1977; 2:00 p.m. 

Faculty Conference Room 

Medical Sciences Building 

University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey ; President Wood 



Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Carlson, Clark, Crain, 
Dennis, Eddy, Gordon, Marks, McNeil, McNulty, Morgenthau, Robert- 
son, Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blues ton^ 
representing Trustee Fielding; Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee 
Okin; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Trustee: Trustee Rowland 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Father Walsh, 
Academic Advisor to the President and Chairman, Organization 
Design Review Committee 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean of 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Catlin, Faculty Representative 

Guest: Mr. Martus , UM/Amherst student 



The meeting was called to order at 2:12 p.m. by Chair- 
man Healey. He asked if there were any amendments to the minutes 
of the previous meeting of the Board. There being none, on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
March 2, 1977. 

Chairman Healey noted that April marked a milestone for 
the Student Trustees, as it brought to a conclusion the terms of 
Trustees Conti and Cronin and initiated the terms of two new stu- 
dents. He said in behalf of the Board he wished to thank Ms. 
Conti and Mr. Cronin for their contributions to Board activities 
during the past year. 



4269 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Prior Meeting 



Thanks and 
Appreciation 
to Outgoing 
Student 
Trustees 



4270 



Board 
Mb/11 

Introduction 
of New Student 
Trustees 

President' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next introduced and welcomed the two 
new Student Trustees, Marion "Pinky" Batiste of UM/Amherst and 
Judith "Judy" Baker of UM/Boston. 

Chairman Healey then called for the President's com- 
ments. President Wood said that in the midst of budgetary con- 
cerns and basic changes in the decision-making structure which 
are occurring at the University, it is important to remember that 
good things are happening in the University. He said he and Mrs 
Wood found tangible expressions of this in two weekend events., 
On Saturday in Providence they attended a race between the junior 
varsity and varsity women's crews of UM/Amherst and those of 
Brown. The junior varsity, he said, had lost by half a length, 
while the varsity had won going away. On Sunday at the Lincoln 
Center in New York they attended a performance of Berlioz' Requi 
em by the 450 member chorus and symphony orchestra of the Five 
Colleges, Amherst, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Hampshire and the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. It was a moving and tremendous perform- 
ance demonstrating the richness, talent and grace of a University 
performing its true function. These, he said, were only two 
examples of hundreds of educational experiences changing the 
lives and opening the world to some 32,000 young people. 

He said he thought it was important to recognize and 
remember these indications of the vital and significant work of 
the University as he turned to more somber matters. In the next 
few weeks and months, said President Wood, the University would 
be faced with at least four challenges, the successful resolutior 
of which would literally determine its fate as an institution of 
quality: 

— First, the continuing delay in funding the 
authorized increases in compensation for 
faculty and staff, totalling for FY 1977 
some $4.3 million and for FY 1978 approxi- 
mately $5.9 million, was a problem that he 
said he hoped might be resolved at a meeting 
of the segments of public higher education 
called for April 7 by Chairman Finnegan of 
the House Ways and Means Committee. 



Second, he said he would be testifying in 
defence of the University budget authorized 
by the Trustees at $131,021,107 in the context 
of a level- funding strategy which would erode 
the setting or priorities. 

Third, he said, was the unremitting pressure 
to join a single management team in collective 
bargaining, led by the Executive Office of 
Administration and Finance, which would, in 
Chairman Healey 's words, "reduce all issues 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of faculty and staff compensation to the 
lowest common denominator of all institutions 
of higher education" — the homogenization of 
the state and community colleges , the Uni- 
versity of Lowell, Southeastern Massachusetts 
University and the University of Massachusetts. 

— Fourth, the continued resistance to allocating 
capital outlay funds appropriated years ago 
to vital projects such as the physical educa- 
tion building at UM/Boston, and the completion 
of site work at UM/Worcester , thus preventing 
full utilization of the facilities, has led 
the University reluctantly to take the matter 
to court. 

President Wood said that in November the University had 
requested proportionately less than the other segments, although 
historically the University has received more than the others. 
The University budget request represented a 15 percent increase 
over the current budget, he said, as compared to a 37 percent in- 
crease requested by community colleges; historically the Univer- 
sity has received 93 percent of its request as compared to 88 per- 
cent received by the community colleges. The University, he said, 
was still in a favored position as a land-grant institution and 
an urban university. Salaries at UM/Amherst, he said, were sub- 
stantially above the median of all land-grant colleges and in the 
top 5 percent of those of comparable size. UM/Boston, he said, 
was third in rank of 13 urban institutions across the country. 

President Wood continued that the threat of erosion was 
clearly represented by the four forces previously identified. In 
the budget testimony, he said, the University would begin to take 
its case to the Commonwealth. He said he would be visiting the 
various facilities and campuses to explain the issues , he would 
be appealing to the alumni, he would take the case to the media 
and would be asking the support of the entire University communit} 
for the institution to which so many lives and careers had been 
devoted. 

He said as the University moves forward to meet these 
four challenges, it will continue to do so in the context of the 
legal authority of the Trustees, which has once again been affirm- 
ed by the Attorney General. He then read, in part, an opinion 
received from Attorney General Bellotti regarding the matter of 
fiscal autonomy in reply to Secretary Buckley's questions concern- 
ing the applicability of the "small business" law to institutions 
of higher education as follows: 

"The nature of the trustees' authority reflects a 
recognition on the part of the General Court that 
an institution of higher learning can thrive only 



-3- 



4£71 



Board 
4/6/77 



4272 



Board 
4/6/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor 's 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in an atmosphere of complete academic freedom. The 
extension of that authority into the areas of budget 
and purchasing reflects a further recognition that, 
ultimately, academic freedom is intimately related to 
fiscal independence." 

The President said that as the University moved into a critical 
six-week period, he was asking for the help, support and under- 
standing of all. 

President Wood said this concluded his remarks and askec 
Chancellor Bromery to speak. Chancellor Bromery said that on the 
following Tuesday, a press conference would be held concerning 
the activities at Habitat House, a building designed and built on 
the Amherst Campus as an experiment in the use of the wind and 
sun as alternative energy sources. Eighty percent of the heat 
for this building has been produced by either a windmill or solar 
collector panels. Dr. William Heronemus , chiefly responsible for 
this experiment, he said, would be speaking on the subject of 
solar energy at the Chancellor's Lecture Series on April 21. 

Chancellor Bromery said that last week the women's gym- 
nastic team had come in fourth in national competition, and two of 
the women were named to the ail-American team. He concluded by 
announcing to the Board that Trustee Eddy had won reelection to 
the Board of Selectmen for the Town of Amherst by a land-slide 
victory. 

Chancellor Golino then spoke briefly, informing the 
Trustees that UM/Boston currently had the highest enrollment in 
its history — a head count of 7,817, or 7,056 FTE students. The 
difference between the two figures, he said, is a reflection of 
the number of part-time students , and particularly the increase 
in those who attend the extended-day program. In addition, he 
said, 344 people from the community are taking courses offered 
through the Community Service Office. An annual Memorial Lecture, 
he said, has been established in honor of the late President 
Kennedy and the first lecture will take place on April 28. Invi- 
tations will be sent to Trustees. 

Chancellor Bulger spoke next, stating that in this 
year's graduating class, the highest proportion ever of students 
(35 of 39) will be going into primary care training programs, 17 in 
Massachusetts; in the residency programs though, the Medical 
School is attracting excellent students from the best American 
schools. Data from other places indicate that many of the Medical 
School's students who go to other states are likely to return to 
practice, and a high proportion of those in the Medical School's 
residencies will remain here. 

« 

Chancellor Bulger added that the Trustees who had ex- 
pressed concern over the revenue projections for the Hospital 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

would be interested to know that the Hospital this month collectec 
over $1 million in revenues, the highest monthly income to date, 
and he anticipated that this was a trend that will continue. 

President Wood asked the Trustees to note that ground- 
breaking for the Kennedy Library would take place on June 12. 
This, he said, concluded his portion of the agenda. 



Chairman Healey then gave the report of the Executive 
Committee, stating that earlier in the day in an executive sessior 
the members of the Committee, together with most members of the 
Board, had considered two personnel actions. The first, he said, 

was a Classification of Position Title (Doc. T77-083) , which estabj- Classification 
lished the position of Executive Vice President. The Executive of Position 
Committee, he said, recommended approval of this position, and on Title 



4273 



Board 
4/6/77 



JFK Library 
Groundbreaking 



Report of the 

Executive 

Committee 



motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position 
Title as detailed in Doc. T77-083. 

The second personnel action was the Appointment of the 
Executive Vice President. The Executive Committee, he said, had 



also recommended approval of this appointment, and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur in the President's action in 
appointing Randolph W. Bromery to serve 
as Executive Vice President of the Uni- 
versity from April 6, 1977, to December 
31, 1977, in addition to his duties as 
Chancellor of the Amherst Campus. 

Trustee Burack voted in opposition to the motion stating that the 
process that was followed did not include prior discussion or 
approval of the position by the Trustees, and because she believec 
this appointment would leave the Amherst campus with a part-time 
Chancellor. 

The next item of agenda, said Chairman Healey, was the 
matter of the Small Business and Minority Business Purchasing 
Program (Doc. T77-082) . At the Chairman's request, President 
Wood commented. The staff work on this program, he said, had 
begun last fall and had been done by the Associate Vice President 
for Business Affairs, Larry Hester, but the moving spirit behind 
the program had been Trustee Dennis. At the request of President 
Wood, Trustee Dennis commented briefly, saying that he had worked 
closely with the staff of the President's Office in developing 
the affirmative action plan to aid small and minority business 
firms in obtaining University purchasing contracts. He said he 
thought the plan was a good one and workable, but that it would 
need to be monitored to make sure that targets were met. He then 
asked Mr. Hester to delineate the four major points of the plan. 



-5- 



(Doc. T77-083) 



Appointment of 
Executive Vice 
President 



Small Business 

and Minority 

Business 

Purchasing 

Program 

(Doc. T77-082) 



4274 



Board 
4/6/77 



Employee 

Compensation 

Adjustments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hester said that the program is the result of action taken by 
the Executive Committee at its August meeting to increase the Uni- 
versity's efforts in affirmative action in purchasing. The pro- 
gram developed proposes: first, the elimination of the bonding 
requirement, which had severely handicapped small businesses; 
second, the University will attempt to find a means of expediting 
the processing of purchase orders; third, standard invoices for 
payment by the State will be flagged to indicate that the vendors 
are small businesses, and payments from non-state funds will be 
processed so as to give priority to small businesses; fourth, it 
is recommended that in FY 1978 $750,000 be targeted for small 
businesses, of which $300,000 will be targeted for minority pur- 
chasing. 

Trustee Dennis said he believed the amounts were high 
enough to have an impact and low enough so that the University 
should be able to meet the targets. He said the implementation 
of the plan would, of course, be more difficult than the designing 
of it, but he would expect the efforts to be successful. The 
quarterly reports to the Trustees, he said, should prove helpful 
in monitoring performance. 

At the request of Chairman Healey , President Wood spoke 
next on the matter of employee compensation adjustments. He said 
the Board members would recall that in March the Governor had 
been requested to make funds available to allow the University to 
make compensation adjustments to personnel within the framework 
of the Alliance agreement. He said that the action by the Trus- 
tees in March was a furtherance of their vote in December author- 
izing the President to take steps to implement adjustments, subject 
to ratification by the Board. He said there were two tracks for 
implementation of these adjustments. The first dealt with the 
release of funds under the collective bargaining agreements, 
which he said he hoped would be resolved the following day. The 
Senate, he said, had voted unanimously to appropriate $8 million 
for this purpose. The second requirement, he said, was the pas- 
sage of the cost-of-living bill, which makes adjustments to the 
general classification act and the pay schedules; these actions 
must take place before adjustments to classified salaries can 
occur. Senator Atkins, Chairman of the Committee on Public Serv- 
ice, which is dealing with this matter, has been asked to expe- 
dite action. 

Pending resolution of these matters, he said, the Univer- 
sity is in a position to carry out parts of the adjustments; 
namely, to pay the bonuses which are to come from the existing 
University budget. The proposed actions, he said, would allow 
payment of the immediate bonus to the professional staff and the 
nonunion classified staff and to make other adjustments as soon 
as the funds are available. Some employees, he said, would not 
qualify for salary adjustments because of present Legislative 
limitations — nonunion classified employees represent one group 



-6- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and personnel at the salary ceiling represent another. 
He hoped, he said, adjustments could be made soon for some 2500 
University employees who have served the University for three 
years without additional compensation. 

Secretary Parks inquired whether the proposed actions 
took issue with the decision of Secretary Buckley to place money 
in the University account as it was needed. President Wood re- 
plied that they dealt only with the bonus portion which will come 
from the existing University budget. The issue of how the remain' 
der will be paid has not yet been resolved, he said. 

There were no further questions, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



and further 



VOTED 



That, in accordance with Trustee Document 
T77-043 and past University policy and 
practice, the President of the University 
be and hereby is authorized to implement 
the vote of December 1, 1976 by paying to 
all state-funded academic and nonacademic 
professional staff cost-of-living adjust- 
ments and bonuses for fiscal year 1977 as 
are provided for all professional state 
employees; provided, however, that sufficient 
funds to meet the cost of such salary adjust- 
ments and bonuses shall first have been 
transferred to the University's maintenance 
account, except for the one-time bonus of 
1-1/2 percent of base salary, with a minimum 
of $150, and, further provided, that any 
such salary adjustments, unless otherwise 
permitted by law, be within the general 
salary schedule. 



That, in accordance with Trustee Document 
T77-043 and past University policy and 
practice, the President of the University 
be and hereby is authorized to implement 
the vote of December 1, 1976 by paying to 
all state-funded nonunion classified 
staff of the University cost-of-living 
adjustments and bonuses for fiscal year 
1977 at a cost comparable to but not 
exceeding the cost of the Commonwealth's 
agreement with the Alliance; provided, 
however, that the general schedule is amended 
or other sufficient authorization enacted to 
provide for such salary adjustments and, 
further provided, that sufficient funds to 



■7- 



4£75 



Board 
4/6/77 



4276 



Board 
4/6/77 



Policy on 
Investments in 
Corporations 
Operating in 
the Union of 
South Africa 



and also 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

meet the cost of such salary adjustments 
shall first have been transferred to the 
University's maintenance account, except 
for the one-time bonus of 1-1/2 percent 
of base salary, with a minimum of $150. 



That, in accordance with Trustee Document 
T77-043 and past University policy and 
practice, the President of the University 
be and hereby is authorized to implement 
the vote of December 1, 1976 by paying to 
all trust fund employees cost-of-living 
adjustments and bonuses for fiscal year 
1977 at a cost comparable to but not ex- 
ceeding the cost of the Commonwealth's 
agreement with the Alliance; provided, 
however, that sufficient trust funds to 
meet the costs of such salary adjustments 
and bonuses are available. 



Chairman Healey called next on Trustee Batiste, who 
said the Undergraduate Student Government Association had held 
many discussions regarding the University's Investments in Corpo- 
rations Operating in the Union of South Africa and had voted unan- 
imously to request the Board of Trustees to divest themselves of 
securities of these corporations. She then asked that Jay Martus 
be recognized to present the views of the SGA. Mr. Martus said 
that since most annual stockholders' meetings occur in April and 
May, a position taken by the Board of Trustees at this time could 
have an impact on these meetings. He then called attention to 
the Trustee guidelines for investment of the endowment fund, in- 
dicating that the students were not suggesting that the guidelines 
be changed or that divestiture be immediate, since they did not 
wish to harm the investment portfolio. However, he said, he 
thought some sort of position should be taken as a social state- 
ment of disapproval of the treatment of blacks by the white South 
African government. He went on to quote statistics indicating 
the plight of black South Africans, noting their lack of franchise, 
the restrictions on free movement and employment, and the require- 
ment that blacks carry identification cards. He called attention 
to the high infant mortality rate and the high percentage of per- 
sons existing on incomes below the poverty line. He said that th^ 
SGA would like to see the Trustees take some kind of action at 
this meeting, either to participate in a shareholders' resolution 
or to communicate with those corporations operating in South 
Africa in which the University has investments, indicating a 
strong position against the policy of apartheid. He said many 
other institutions were taking such stands. He said the SGA woulcj 
also like to request the Committee on Budget and Finance to deter-r- 
mine which corporations were operating in South Africa, requesting 



-8- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

them to withdraw and to do so within six months. He then read 
the motion taken by the Student Government Association, as fol- 
lows : 



BE IT VOTED: 



That the Corporations that are operating in 
the Republic of South Africa do not have a 
responsible posture in matters relating to 
public health, equal employment opportunities, 
and do not comply with international law. 
Therefore, the University should take informed 
and ethical positions whenever it exercises 
its voting rights as a stockholder and should 
communicate directly with all such corporations 
that the Committee on Budget and Finance deter- 
mines to be operating within the Union of South 
Africa and to request that they cease doing 
business within the country. Further, any 
corporations who do not conform to either 
shareholder resolutions or our communiques 
by leaving South Africa should be sold from 
the investment portfolio no later than October 
6, 1977. Further, the Board shall publicize 
its reasons for doing the aforementioned action. 



Trustee Batiste then moved that the foregoing motion be 
adopted. The motion was seconded and discussion ensued. Trustee 
Carlson said that since two issues were involved, one of invest- 
ment management and the other of a symbolic policy question, he 
would prefer that the Committee on Budget and Finance discuss the 
issue and develop formal recommendations before the Board took 
action on a matter of such importance and complexity. 

Secretary Parks congratulated the students for their 
action in bringing this matter to the attention of the Board and 
said he thought the Board could take a position on the ethical 
posture, at the same time delegating to the Committee on Budget 
and Finance consideration of the managerial aspects of the matter, 
Trustee Morgenthau said she, too, welcomed the students' action 
and commended them for the breadth of their presentation, but 
suggested that some of the data presented should be updated. She 
said the Board should be very sure of its facts before it took 
action. Recently, she said, because of an economic decline in 
South Africa, many corporations were attempting to pull out. 
Divestiture may not be the best way in all cases to ensure positive 
social action. She suggested that the University should ask each 
of the corporations in which the University has investments to 
report its actions in this area and to learn from them the extent 
to which these companies are using their economic and social power 
to further social reform in human rights. She suggested that 
whatever action the University takes, it should be as productive 
as possible. There was consensus that the Baord should take a 
position against the policy of apartheid, but there was consider- 



-9- 






Board 
4/6/77 



/c « »,r — r r* 



4278 



Board 
4/6/77 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



UM/Boston — 
Concurrence in 
Award of Tenure 
to Dr. Martin 
Posner 



UM/Worcester-- 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Dr. Stanley 
Walzer as 
Professor of 
Psychiatry with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T77-080) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

able discussion as to the exact form the vote should take to best 
accomplish its intent. Chairman Healey asked Trustee Breyer to 
work with Trustee Batiste to draft language for the Board and 
postponed action on the motion to later in the meeting. 

Chairman Healey then asked for the report of the Commit- 
tee on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Spiller reported that the 
Committee had met on March 8 to discuss four issues — the Tillson 
Power Plant at UM/Amherst, the Seawater Cooling System at UM/ 
Boston, the Library Roof at UM/Boston and the Physical Education 
Building, also at UM/Boston. He said these were the main items 
of the agenda and would continue to be until they had been resolveid. 
The problems, he said, were of a legal nature, and the minutes of 
the meeting contained the details of each; therefore, he said, 
his report would be brief. He said that the University was doing 
all in its power to get action from the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction and the Commission on Administration and Finance, but 
was not getting much cooperation from either. He said the delays 
on one item alone had probably incurred unwritten costs of over 
$300,000 and these costs would escalate as delays continued. He 
said he thought it was a sad commentary on the state government. 



Chairman Healey called next for the report of the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy reported 
that the Committee had met on March 23. The Committee, he said, 
had gone into executive session to deal with two personnel matters 
and at the conclusion of the executive session had recommended 
two votes. 

The first recommendation, he said, was for Concurrence 
in the Award of Tenure to Dr. Martin Posner — UM/Boston. It was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To concur in the award of tenure by the 
President to Martin Posner, Associate 
Professor of Physics at the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston. 

The second recommendation, he said, was for Concurrence 



in the Appointment of Dr. Stanley Walzer as Professor of Psychia- 
try with Tenure — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-080) . Chancellor Bulger 
and Ms. Bluestone both commented on the good fortune of the Uni- 
versity to have obtained someone with both the academic credentials 
and the interest in the educational mission of the University in 
meshing the service needs of the state mental hospitals and the 
mental health needs of the central and western parts of the state 
with the educational mission of the Medical School. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To concur in the appointment by the 
President of Dr. Stanley Walzer as 



-10- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor of Psychiatry with tenure at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, 
as set forth in Doc. T77-080. 

The next item of agenda, said Trustee Troy, was the 
Change in Name of Departmental Title to Department of Aerospace 



4279 



Board 
4/6/77 



Studies (Doc. T77-079) . This change, he said, was a redesignatior 



of the Department of Air Science in the Division of Military and 
Air Science. Such changes had been made by many other institu- 
tions but had not been done at UM/Amherst because of possible 
confusion with the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engi- 
neering in the Engineering School. The word "Aerospace" has now 
been dropped from the name of the Engineering School department 
and therefore the redesignation now seemed appropriate. On motior. 
made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To redesignate the Department of Air Science 
in the Division of Military and Air Science 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
as the Department of Aerospace Studies, as 
set forth in Doc. T77-079. 

Trustee Troy said the last item of agenda for the Com- 
mittee had been a discussion of Basic Education at UM/Amherst and 
UM/Boston. 



UM/Amherst — 
Change in Name 
of Departmental 
Title to 
Department of 
Aerospace 
Studies 
(Doc. T77-079) 



1 



I 



Because of the weather, he said, the Amherst personne 
had not been able to attend the meeting, and because of lack of 
time, the Boston discussion had been limited to the basic skill 
of writing. At the next meeting discussion of this topic, he 
said, would be continued, and mathematics would also be discussed 
Because the minutes were full and complete, he said he would not 
go into detail at the meeting, but he said the Committee was en- 
couraged to hear how the faculty, particularly in the Department 
of English of the College of Liberal Arts, were facing up to the 
most vital problem of teaching accurate written expression to 
large numbers of students who come into the University severely 
unprepared despite some twelve years of exposure to English class- 
es. He said that this was not a new problem and was not confined 
to the University, but was national in scope. He said, however, 
that a valiant attempt is being made to correct these deficiencies 
as early as possible in the college years, and that the Committee 
was pleased to hear of the dedication of the UM/Boston faculty to 
this cause. 

Chairman Healey next called for the report of the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs. Trustee Shearer said that the minutes 
of the March 22 meeting of the Committee were also complete and 
referred Board members to them. She then summarized the high- 
lights, saying that a recurring theme for the Committee was the 
matter of student support services at UM/Boston. She said the 
Committee had also considered the extension of the Need-based 
Tuition Waiver Policy for two academic years and the subject of 
student fees at UM/Amherst. No action was recommended at this 



-11- 



UM/Amherst — 
UM/Boston — 
Basic Education 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student Affairs 



m ■*-»>** ."a 



4280 



Board 
4/6/77 



Report of 
Delegate to 
AGB Conference 



Policy on 
Investments in 
Corporations 
Operating in 
the Union of 
South Africa 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

time, she said, as these matters would also be on the agenda for 
the meeting of the Committee on Budget and Finance later this 
month before coming to the Board for action in May. At the April 
14 meeting of the Student Affairs Committee, she said, student 
fees at UM/Boston and UM/Worcester would be discussed, and in 
June the Committee would consider the matter of student housing. 
That concluded her report. 

Chairman Healey asked Trustee Burack to report on the 
National Conference on Trusteeship held on March 13-15, sponsored 
by the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Col- 
leges. Trustee Burack said that since she had circulated a writ- 
ten report, her oral report would be brief. Some 600 persons 
attended the conference in Williamsburg, she said, and the two 
most productive sessions she attended were on Tenure and Collective 
Bargaining. Unfortunately, she said, they were held concurrently, 
so that she attended the formal session of the first and the in- 
formal session of the second. Richard Chait, Director of the 
Institute for Educational Management at Harvard, led the session 
on tenure, she said, at which alternatives to the tenure practice 
were discussed. He recommended strongly, she said, that Boards 
of Trustees set up guidelines for judging tenure appointments. 
He also stressed the need for a regular reviewing process on the 
relationship between tenure and the goals of the institution. 

With regard to Collective Bargaining, she said, the in- 
formal session she attended had been rather disorganized but 
interesting. Participants included people from institutions who 
have not experienced the collective bargaining process to those 
who had been involved in it for some time. The first few years, 
she said, were reported to be the hardest, but the adversarial 
position continued. A small breakfast meeting on Governing and 
Coordinating Boards of Public Higher Education, she said, had 
also proved useful and productive. 

Chairman Healey asked Trustee Breyer if he was ready to 
read the amended motion on Investments in Corporations Operating 
in South Africa. Professor Breyer replied affirmatively, reading 
the motion. The amended motion was seconded and it was then 

VOTED : The Board, deeply concerned about the South 
African government's racial policies, which 
it finds morally repugnant, determines that 
the Committee on Budget and Finance will re- 
view University investment policy to make 
certain that that policy will not further 
South African racial policies in any way, 
either symbolically or practically, and that 
the Committee will review University invest- 
ment policy more generally to make certain it 
is being conducted in a socially responsible 
manner. The Committee is to make a progress 
report at the next meeting of the Board. 



-12- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next asked Trustee Breyer to report on 
the progress of the Ad Hoc Committee on Reorganization. Trustee 
Breyer said he had prepared a preliminary analysis of the reorgan-j Committee on 



Board 
4/6/77 



Progress Report 
of Ad Hoc 



ization bill for discussion purposes and the Committee had then 
met on March 23 with Richard Ames, Assistant Secretary of Educa- 
tional Affairs, to discuss the points raised in the analysis. Dis- 
cussion at this meeting had resulted in a consensus that a Univer- 
sity policy should reflect the views of all segments of the Uni- 
versity and, with that in mind, it was decided that position papers 
from both faculty and students from each of the campuses would be 
helpful. 

The Chancellors had been requested to obtain this infor- 
mation for the Committee, after the receipt of which the Committee 
would meet to develop a statement incorporating University-wide 
views. Professor Sulzner said the faculty at UM/Amherst presentl} 
had a committee working on this matter. 

Chairman Healey asked Trustee Troy for his report as 
Delegate to the Board of Higher Education. Trustee Troy said the'; 
Board had met on March 8 and had taken two important votes. The 
first allows degree granting rights to Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital in some specific areas at both the bachelor's and the 
master's level. The second, he said, was a vote related to re- 
organization of higher education. He said that Representative 
Anne Gannet had resubmitted the bill submitted last year by the 
BHE and the BHE had voted to support the bill with an amendment 
designating the Secretary of Education as an ex officio voting mem- 
ber. He said that BHE also supports, in general, the principles 
contained in the Secretary's bill. He then listed some of the 
qualifications that the BHE had expressed along with its approval 
of the Secretary's bill. 



Trustee McNulty asked if it were appropriate at this 
time to ask the Board to reconsider its vote on the unit deter- 
mination of the Collective Bargaining agent. Chairman Healey 
said that it was not in order and that if it should be necessary 
to reconsider the matter, a special meeting would be held for 
that purpose. He said that unless there was a serious prospect 
that the members of the Board would entertain favorably such a 
motion, he did not think the issue should be discussed. At least 
five or six members of the Board would have to express a desire 
to reconsider, he said, before he would consider reopening the 
matter. Chancellor Bromery said that with the establishment of 
the Trustee Ad Hoc Committee on Labor Relations, all matters 
relating to this subject should be referred to that Committee. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 



Reorganization 



Report of 
Delegate to 
the Board of 
Higher Education 





Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-13- 



4282 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



' 



' 



™ 



ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 4, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey ; President Wood; 
Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Clark, Crain, Dennis, 
Gordon, Marks, McNulty, Morgenthau, Robertson, Romer, Rowland, 
Shearer, Spiller, Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Bluestone rep- 
resenting Trustee Fielding; Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller; Ms. Eichel, 
recorder 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Carlson, McNeil and Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Bench, 
Associate Counsel to the University; Mr. Cooley, Associate Vice 
President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice Pres- 
ident for University Policy 



UM/Amherst : 
and Provost: 



Mr. Puryear , Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative 



UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests: Ms. Joyce Alexander, Board of Higher Education; Mr. 



Stanley Chiz, Vice President, Alumni Association (Alumni Repre- 
sentative to the Board); Ms. Nancy Eddy, former Trustee; Mr. John 
O'Connell, Alumni Association 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 
11:15 a.m. Chairman Healey asked first for an executive session 
to discuss the matter dealing with collective bargaining. At the 
conclusion of the executive session, he said, the meeting would 
continue in open session. At 11:18 a.m. it was moved, seconded, 
and on roll call unanimously 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss a 
collective bargaining matter. 

At 11:50 a.m. it was moved, seconded and 



Executive 
Session 



>** .<a 



Board 
5/4/77 



Expression of 
Appreciation 
to former 
Trustee Nancy 
Eddy 



Introduction 
of new Trustee, 
Diana H. Romer 

Introduction 
of UM/Amherst 
Associate 
Alumni Repre- 
sentative 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Prior Meeting 



Presidential 
Agenda 



Budget 
Hearings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

Chairman Healey reconvened the meeting in open session 
at 11:55 a.m. First, he expressed the thanks and appreciation of 
the Board to Nancy Eddy, who had served as an ex officio Trustee 
in her capacity as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen for the 
Town of Amherst. He said she had been very helpful in furthering 
good relations between the University and the community. Ms. 
Eddy, he said, would be continuing to serve the Commonwealth in 
her capacity as a member of the Governor's Advisory Committee of 
Municipal Officers on the problems of the cities and towns in the 
Commonwealth in addition to serving as Vice Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen for the Town of Amherst. 

Ms. Eddy responded that it had been a pleasure to serve 
on the University Board and that she knew her successor, Ms. 
Romer, would continue to bring the concerns of the Town to the 
Board. 

Chairman Healey next introduced and welcomed Trustee 
Diana H. Romer, who he said was currently a graduate student at 
UM/Amherst, specializing in Educational Administration and Finance 

Chairman Healey added that the Associate Alumni of UM/ 
Amherst had formally voted to send a representative to Board meet- 
ings. He then introduced and welcomed Stanley Chiz as the alumni 
representative. Mr. Chiz, he said, is the Vice President and 
President-designate of the Associate Alumni. Mr. Chiz commented 
that he would like to make a pledge to the Board that his activ- 
ities and those of the Association would be for the best interest^ 
of the University. 



Chairman Healey next called for consideration of the 
minutes of the previous meeting, and on motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meeting of 
April 6, 1977. 

Chairman Healey then asked President Wood for his com- 
ments. President Wood said that on April 7 the University had 
testified on the FY 1978 budget request before the House Ways and 
Means Committee. There were questions concerning the status of 
collective bargaining, the admissions process at the Medical 
School and the UM/Boston physical education building. No ques- 
tions were asked about the budgets of any of the campuses or the 
total University budget request for $131 million. 

On April 14, he said, Chairman Healey and he met infor- 
mally with the Chairman of the Joint House and Senate Ways and 
Means Committee and representatives of the other segments of pub- 
lic higher education to discuss the process of achieving the cost 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of-living and compensation adjustments mandated earlier for other 
State personnel by the Alliance settlement. He said they believed 
at the time that they had reached some understanding with respect 
to both the amount the University would need to meet the payments 
in full and the two processes of dealing with the organized fac- 
ulty, on the one hand, and the salary schedule for the unorganized 
classified personnel, on the other. He said that further discus- 
sions had been held and the point had been reached where now all 
that was necessary was for the physical transfer of the necessary 
monies by the Comptroller to the University. The process for mak- 
ing the transfers, he said, is a matter that the Secretary of 
Administration and Finance and his associates must resolve. He 
said he had hoped to be able to announce that the adjustments 
could now be made, but he could not yet do so. Senator Olver and 
Representative Collins, he said, had been active in helping to 
resolve the obstacles between the mandated adjustments and the 
receipt of the money to cover them. 



Board 
5/4/77 



On April 21, April 27 and May 3 he had made visits to 
the campuses and off-campus facilities, as well as visiting with 
other public and private college presidents. On these trips he 
also had briefing sessions with the local press, where he empha- 
sized the importance of the University to key industries and the 
economic base of the Commonwealth: such as the major contributions 
of the Cranberry Station not only to the industry but to fresh 
water planning of the entire Cape; the activities of the Waltham 
Field Station and its relationships to the extermination industry, 
to florists, vegetable growers and the general public represented 
by 38,000 telephone inquiries annually from suburbanites in the 
metropolitan area and 16,000 visitors. He said one thing he had 
learned from these briefing sessions with the regional media was 
that there is an extraordinary lack of knowledge about the Uni- 
versity and its activities. He said he felt that these visits 
had begun to correct this lack of information. However, he said 
he had received some very heartening testimony from President 
Justin McCarthy of Framingham State College and President Ernest 
Bartell of Stonehill College with regard to common concerns, as 
well as support from important industries and private sector 
activities . 



Regional Visits 



President Wood said that interspersed with the other 
activities, discussions have been held with faculty, students and 
administrators on the three campuses with regard to the status of 
University planning. Since this is a major issue, he said, he 
had been following the standard practice of as wide-spread dis- 
semination of information as possible. He said that he would 
briefly outline the history of the planning process and summarize 
the important issues. There have been essentially two streams of 
planning activity, he said, dating from the adoption of the 1973 
governance document. He said, the three important events in the 
planning process were the deliberations in 1973 of the Academic 
Personnel Policy Committee, the 1974 five-year academic plan for 
UM/Amherst developed by Provost Gluckstern, and the Trustee meet- 



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Planning 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ing at the Parkman House in 1975, where five-year campus plans 
were discussed. 

He said one stream of activities began last fall at a 
meeting of the Chancellor's Council, as a response to requests 
from the Academic Personnel Policy Committee that delegation of 
tenure-awarding authority to the campuses be considered because 
of the number and complexity of evaluations and the fundamental 
principles of peer group judgments. This matter was further dis- 
cussed with the three Provosts, the Chairman of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy and with individual Trustees. He 
said that consideration of such a delegation of tenure authority 
had to be contingent on the development of plans, which had begun 
at the time of the Parkman House meeting, and that evaluation for 
tenure had to be in the context of campus long-range academic 
plans and goals. 



He said it had been hoped that it might be possible for 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy to consider in 
May and June the matter of further delegation of tenure-awarding 
authority, but it now does not appear to be possible this year 
since the development of campus long-range academic plans are stilj 
in process. He said this matter will now probably be considered 
at the same time as a review is undertaken of the whole matter of 
governance in the context of faculty collective bargaining. 



The second stream of activities, President Wood said, 
also began with the governance document, which places the respon- 
sibility for preparing a master plan for the University with the 
President in conjunction with the Trustee Committee on Long-Range 
Planning, and with the Multicampus Planning Committee in an advi- 
sory role. He said the initial phase in the development of a 
master plan had been to conduct a campus-by-campus review that 
was essentially conservatory in nature, resulting in the various 
Long-Range Planning Committee policy statements on enrollments 
against a background of changed circumstances. The 1973 report 
on New Directions and New Realities, he said, had drastically 
altered the original plans and timetable for evolution of the 
Boston campus. The revised plan meant a reduction of some $55 
million in capital outlay and a reordering of the entire original 
plan. At UM/Worcester , he said, consideration had been given to 
a proposal developed by then Dean Soutter, and again it had been 
determined that the plan would require modification due to lack 
of necessary resources; for example, the proposal for a facility 
for veterinary medicine had been rejected. At UM/Amherst, also, 
student typologies had been reviewed, guidelines developed for the: 
student mix between graduate and undergraduate and a limit was 
placed on enrollments. 

President Wood said that this year's activities had 
been devoted to providing a framework within which all the cam- 
puses could work in developing plans for academic programs, stu- 
dent support services, administration and physical facilities. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The schedule was tied to the budget cycle, he said, in the hope 
of escaping the snare of having budgets drive the programs. 
Having lived for three years, he said, with these matters being 
determined by the budget, it was now time to make a statement 
about what kind of university it should be and to determine what 
directions a viable university should take in a rapidly changing 
environment and a changing student body. 

As the planning progressed, he said, it had been found, 
for example, that at UM/Amherst applications were down 25 percent 
from last year and 29 percent from 1975; however, the yield was 
up 40 percent from last year and 4 percent from 1975. The insti- 
tution of an application fee, he said, could probably explain 
some of the decline in applications. He went on to say that stud- 
ies at UM/Amherst show that since 1973 the instructional workload 
in Arts and Sciences has declined 8.7 percent, in Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics it has increased 18.1 percent; however, workload 
in Arts and Sciences minus Natural Sciences and Math has declined 
19.9 percent, and in the professional schools excluding Education 
it has increased 18.7 percent. It had also been found that 60 
percent of all instruction was in the Arts and Sciences. Students 
in the professional schools take 30-45 percent of their instruc- 
tion in the Arts and Sciences. 

Circumstances change, said President Wood, but planning 
must start at a given point in time, with a basic set of data. 
Since the President's Office is responsible for the initiation of 
planning, he said, based on the data available, some initial as- 
sumptions had been made. He said these assumptions and guidelines 
after Trustee review, would be forwarded to the campuses for reac- 
tion and ultimately provide the framework within which campus 
plans are refined. 

Given the development of general directions and priori- 
ties over five years, from which resource determination flows, 
said the President, it is then possible to plan a resource strat- 
egy and estimate what funds can be sought from the state, the 
federal government, the alumni, foundations and the private sector 
and to begin to match the interests of the various agencies and 
organizations with the aspirations, needs and programs of the Uni- 
versity. President Wood said explicit in the planning process is 
the assumption that the University has certain basic needs which 
must be met by resource planning if it is to survive, prosper and 
go forward and this was explicit in his instructions that one does 
not prepare a doomsday plan. A doomsday document, he said, simply 
ties the University to the budget and it also implies that the 
University is prepared to go no further than present conditions 
dictate. The planning document, he said, is a statement of what 
the University sees to be genuine needs. It sets forth assump- 
tions and propositions that speak to demographic and economic 
trends of a universal or statewide nature and, using authoritative 
data from outside of the University, has tried to make some state- 



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Report of 
Committee on 
Long-Range 
Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ments about the University on the basis of existing data. He said 
one assumption is that the state will be successful in its attempt 
to restore its economic base. This assumption was based on the 
work of the Council for Northeast Economic Action, data provided 
by regional economists and banking industry projections. Another 
assumption, he said, relating to enrollment, was made after study 
ing high school graduation forecasts of students now in elementary 
and secondary schools in the Commonwealth who will be going on to 
college. He said it was assumed that this number, and the Univer- 
sity's share of this number, would not abruptly change. In addi- 
tion, with regard to the changing clientele of higher education, 
he said, there are three new sources of clientele whose educa- 
tional needs are not clearly known as yet — the elderly, those in 
mid-career, and women who are returning to professional life after 
their families no longer require their presence in the home. He 
said also considered, but not reflected in the statement of as- 
sumptions, was the possibility that young people out of high schoojl 
might opt for work experience before going on to college. Also 
considered were the numbers of master's and doctoral students in 
the professional and arts and science areas. He said this data 
was being reviewed in relation to each of the campuses, in the 
light of their quite different goals. 



The document reviewed by the Long-Range Planning Commit- 
tee and currently under consideration, he said, represented broad 
stroke assumptions which seemed to be reasonable based on past 
experience. It is expected, he said, that feedback on the assump- 
tions and scenarios will be received from all parts of the Univer- 
sity for reconsideration. He said he was hopeful that the assump- 
tions would then be the basis for the beginning of an evolving 
statement of priorities and missions that would impact on academic 
programs, support services, and capital outlay and maintenance 
budgets, so that the needs of the University can be met in an 
orderly way rather than continue a practice of having to rob Peter 
to pay Paul. President Wood said that the document was an attempt 
to set a rationale and a framework for the development of a five- 
year plan which could be used to defend the University budgets, 
and which could be issued as a reasonable and cogent public state- 
ment of the University's goals as a means of counteracting the 
varying misconceptions now held, ranging from the belief that 
the University is expanding mindlessly to the idea that it is 
falling back to a British square in a state of seige. 

At the conclusion of President Wood's remarks, he said 
that he would ask the Chancellors to forego their comments, and th 
Chairman then asked Trustee Rowland to report for the Committee 
on Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland first thanked the Presi- 
dent for giving the history of the planning process. She then 
commented that the Board might find her horoscope for the day 
amusing, which forecast the following: "A good day for long-range 
thinking and plans. Review carefully before launching unfamiliar 
ventures, but do not hesitate to try for a new achievement." 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Her report, she said, came as part of a general and 
extended dialogue about the planning process for the University. 
As her cover memo last week suggested, she said, Planning Assump- 
tions for the University (Doc. T77-094) , were part of a three- 
year process of discussion and study by the Committee on Long- 
Range Planning. The Trustees, she said, had quite frankly been 
finding their way as to the appropriate issues and manner for the 
Trustees to fulfill their responsibilities for shaping the Uni- 
versity's plans and direction. In general the Committee had con- 
centrated on setting guidelines regarding the rate and limits of 
campus growth and the "mix" of graduate and undergraduate, part- 
time and full-time, upper and lower division students. These 
guidelines had important implications for program development and 
capital planning. They represented extensions and modifications 
of plans which have been assumed or written at various times duripg 
her 12-year tenure on the Board. But they also represented the 
beginning of a much more deliberate effort to shape the University 
in response to changing times, expectations and resources. 

When the Long-Range Planning Committee met on April 20, 
she said, the initial discussion dealt with how the basic plannin 
assumptions and guidelines before them in draft form were related 
to the University's and Committee's planning efforts of previous 
years, and how to make clear the distinction between the master 
planning assumptions and the particular proposals and reallocations 
contained in the preliminary campus academic plans put forward by 
the Provosts. The substance of this discussion, said Trustee 
Rowland, was reflected in her cover memorandum of April 26, and 
the more extensive review by President Wood of the planning process 
She called particular attention to the Committee's conviction 
that the planning process should be broadly consultative, but tha 
"it must also take place within a context of assumptions, priori- 
ties and expectations which had been established by the Trustees. 

The discussion today, she said, was in this context. 
She also emphasized that adopting the assumptions as presented or 
amended did not imply approval, or disapproval, of currently pro- 
posed campus academic plans. It provided a framework within whic^i 
those plans could be discussed, reviewed, and expanded to address 
other areas. 

Trustee Rowland said she felt it was fair to say that 
the Trustees on the Committee had very few questions or disagree- 
ments on the planning assumptions and campus guidelines. She saifl 
she believed the primary reason for this was that they were rea- 
sonable and general and represented no major departures from what 
most of the Trustees had assumed or accepted for some time. In 
response to a question raised by the Boston faculty representative 
about allocations for liberal arts vis-a-vis professional or 
career-oriented studies, she said, the Committee added a phrase 
to the assumptions speaking to an "appropriate balance" between 
the two. She said she believed the lack of debate reflected 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

further the realization that the University is in an evolutionary 
and flexible process. The assumptions and guidelines, she said, 
were not set in concrete, nor should they be. 

She then highlighted some points made in the campus 
guidelines. With regard to enrollment at Amherst, she said, the 
guidelines are basically a restatement of those already adopted 
by the Board. The Worcester guidelines with regard to enrollment, 
she said, are somewhat different, representing a goal of expanding 
clinical education programs in the allied health area in collabo- 
ration with other educational institutions. The expansion of the 
medical school class size is really a prediction that within the 
next five years the University will take advantage of the oppor- 
tunity to serve more students within the same facilities and with- 
out proportionate expansion of faculty. The Boston guideline of 
8500-9000 students within the planning period represents a slower, 
more deliberate growth than that anticipated in the Trustees' guide- 
lines of three years ago, and those were a substantial reduction 
from the original master plan for the campus. She said she thought 
this was evidence of a prudent and flexible approach. The state- 
ments about strengthened student support services, she said, also 
reflected a long-standing commitment of the Trustees and University 
administration. 

In conclusion, Trustee Rowland emphasized that the as- 
sumptions and guidelines were important in providing a consistent 
backdrop for detailed planning where that is appropriate and also 
for decision making by both Trustees and administrators, and that 
she believed the Trustees collectively had the obligation to ap- 
prove and determine the pace and direction in which the University 
should move forward. She then read the proposed vote: 



MOVED : To direct the President to transmit to the 
Chancellors the planning assumptions and 
scenarios for the University that are contained 
in Doc. T77-094 to serve as guidelines in the 
further development of campus plans and in the 
continued development of the master plan for 
the University. 

Trustee Morgenthau said that although she welcomed the 
opening of the process and found the proposed document stimulatin 
interesting and an excellent basis for discussion, she was not ye 
ready to accept the document as guidelines from the Trustees. 
She then proposed the following amendment, which she said would 
allow the Trustees who had not participated in the Long-Range 
Planning Committee meeting to begin the process of discussion and 
to determine what guidelines they wished to set: 

MOVED : To direct the President to transmit to the 
Chancellors the planning assumptions and 
scenarios for the University that are contained 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in Doc. T77-094 so as to further discussion 
leading to the development of campus plans 
and the continued development of <a master 
plan for the University. 

Trustee Burack asked if the effect of Trustee Morgen- 
thau's amended motion was to change the action so that the Board 
would not be approving the guidelines , which she said she was not 
ready to do. If so, she suggested that the word "tentative" be 
inserted before "planning assumptions" to clarify the intent fur- 
ther. She said since the implications of the guidelines were far 
reaching, she would not want to take an action before she had 
listened to views from all the campuses. When this had occurred, 
she said, then she believed the final decision was a Trustee re- 
sponsibility. 



Chairman Healey asked if Trustee Burack would accept 
the word "preliminary" instead of "tentative." She said that 
"preliminary" would be an acceptable substitute. 



At the request of Trustee Marks, Secretary Hardy read 
the amended motion, as follows: 

MOVED: To direct the President to transmit to the 

Chancellors preliminary planning assumptions 
and scenarios for the University that are 
contained in Doc. T77-094 so as to further 
discussion leading to the development of 
campus plans and the continued development 
of a master plan for the University. 

Chairman Healey asked if the amendment was acceptable 
to the Committee on Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland replied 
that the Committee had made its recommendations and it was under- 
stood that the assumptions were not set in concrete. 

Chairman Troy said he was concerned that the guidelines 
were not really broad stroke, since he said there were several 
very specific proposals included. He cited several assumptions 
which he felt needed Board discussion as to their implications. 

Chairman Healey said that the document was meant to 
serve as a basis for further discussion. Trustee Marks said he 
could accept the amended motion, for he believed it would still 
enable the Long-Range Planning Committee to proceed with discus- 
sion of the assumptions item by item. Trustee Robertson said 
that he felt the word "preliminary" was unnecessary since the 
document spoke for itself; however, he did not believe the amend- 
ment to the motion changed the intent that the document would 
serve as the basis for discussion and that feedback from faculty, 
students and others would be sought. Trustee Burack said that 
the assumptions required discussion and agreement by the Trustees 



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Planning 
Assumptions 
for the 
University 
(Doc. T77-094) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Breyer said that he had voted for the assump- 
tions, not because he agreed with every assumption, but because 
he felt it was a means of forcing the campuses to make choices 
and to develop viable alternatives. He said the assumptions coulc 
be debated item by item, but this process would be too slow. The 
alternative was what the proposed document was meant to do — to 
force the development of alternatives which will present the 
Trustees and others with real choices. If the language of the 
motion was too weak, however, there was also the danger that the 
assumptions would not be taken seriously. He emphasized the im- 
portance of forcing hard choices and fostering competition for 
limited resources between departments if the University is to 
avoid universal mediocrity. 

Ms. Blues tone objected to major assumptions being pre- 
sented to the Trustees prior to individual campus discussions of 
them and she questioned the validity of some of the assumptions 
as she felt she had not been presented with adequate documentatior. 

President Wood replied that these assumptions had been 
developed as a set of reasonable propositions based on reasonable 
background documents on which a group of professional staff had 
been at work for some time. He added that these were beginning 
assumptions, which it is not expected will be accepted on faith, 
but which will be used as a means of getting data and plans from 
the campuses. But unless some fairly explicit statements are 
made, the hard issues will not be faced and the planning process 
will falter and be abandoned. The purpose of the document, he 
said, is to focus the attention of the campuses on the issues in- 
volved. 

Chairman Healey reemphasized that the Board was not be- 
ing asked to approve each individual assumption but merely to ap- 
prove the assumptions as a basis for the planning process. 

Trustee Morgenthau said she found the document to be an 
excellent basis for discussion. She could not, however, accept 
the word "guidelines" because she had seen what happens once 
guidelines are approved. 

At 1:00 p.m. Chairman Healey recessed the meeting. The 
Chairman reconvened the meeting at 2:10 p.m. He asked Trustee 
Rowland if there had been any further discussion on the amendments: 
to the original motion. Trustee Rowland said that she had polled 
those members of the Long-Range Planning Committee who were pres- 
ent and they had agreed to accept a further revision of the motion 
by Trustee Morgenthau. She then read the further amended motion 

MOVED : To direct the President to transmit to the 
Chancellors the planning framework for the 
University outlined in Doc. T77-094 so as to 
further discussion leading to development of 



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campus plans and the continued development 
of a master plan for the University. 

Trustee Burack then requested a further amendment to the 
vote, asking that the words "as a basis of discussion by faculty, 
students and Trustees" be inserted after the words "so as" on the 
third line of the vote. This amendment was not accepted by Trus- 
tee Rowland. 



Trustee Crain said he had some questions regarding the 
document which he would like to resolve before he was asked to 
vote on the motion. He then cited several assumptions about which 
he had questions and said he hoped the Trustees might set aside 
a day for a full discussion of all the assumptions. He suggested 
that this might possibly be done during the informal retreat of 
the Trustees. 

Trustee Spiller questioned the value of the Committee 
structure of the Board if every action by a committee was to re- 
ceive such full discussion by the Board. Either there had to be 
trust among the membership of the Board, or there was no reason 
for committees to meet. He said there was a basic management and 
organizational problem which must be faced by the Board if it 
hopes to function. Chairman Healey agreed that Board procedures 
did need to be discussed and this would be done at the meeting at 
the Parkman House in June. 

Trustee Troy said that when issues of this magnitude 
arose, he felt the need for full discussion by all the members of 
the Board before a judgment was made and action taken. 

Chairman Healey said he agreed that the process had to 
allow for further consideration by all the constituencies of the 
University before final action was taken. 

Professor Sulzner commented that he felt that before the 
campus was asked to initiate the intensive planning process with 
which it had been involved over the past month, the Board's guide- 
lines should have been agreed upon and made available for use in 
the planning process. 

President Wood responded to Professor Sulzner f s comment 
by reminding him that the Board had a year ago adopted a planning 
framework for the Amherst campus after one year of consultation 
with the campus. That document, he said, was, or should have 
been, the basis for the first stream of the planning process. The 
proposed document, he said, was more comprehensive and was the 
means of implementing the second stream of planning. 

Secretary Parks said he could support the motion, but 
asked by what process the Board would then make the hard decisions 
that must be made. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Boelcskevy said the UM/Boston faculty asked 
for assurance that faculty and students would have input into the 
final decisions. 

President Wood said that the governance document spelled 
out the planning procedures, that these procedures had been fol- 
lowed during the three years of planning and would continue to be 
followed . 

Trustee Troy said a group of faculty and administrators 
from UM/Amherst and UM/Boston would be meeting on May 10 with mem- 
bers of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy to discuss 
their concerns about faculty participation in the planning process 
This, he said, is another reason why he would like to hold off in 
making a decision at the Board meeting on the planning assumptions 

Chairman Healey asked President Wood if he would briefly 
summarize the process by which these assumptions had come about. 
President Wood said that he had attempted to do that in his intro- 
ductory statement and would only add that the present proposal 
was developed beginning with two meetings of the Committee on 
Long-Range Planning and continued at the last meeting and was now, 
he believed, in appropriate form to forward to the campuses for 
response. The manner of the response, he said, he would leave to 
the good judgment of the Chancellors. Trustee Morgenthau said 
that the purpose of her amendment was to focus attention on the 
fact that planning was a continuous process. She said it must be 
made quite clear that faculty and students were absolutely essen- 
tial in the feedback process in the continuing development of the 
plan. 

Trustee Breyer commented that it seemed to him better 
to take action on the assumptions document at this meeting than 
to call the process to a halt. He said it is necessary, in his 
opinion, to force students, faculty, administrators and Trustees 
to take the planning process seriously, while understanding that 
discussions will continue as the planning process evolves. 

The motion on the floor was then 

VOTED : To direct the President to transmit to the 
Chancellors the planning framework for the 
University outlined in Doc. T77-094 so as to 
further discussion leading to development of 
campus plans and the continued development 
of a master plan for the University. 

For the motion : Trustees Breyer, Dennis, Gordon, Healey, Marks, 
Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Spiller and Wood; Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing Trustee 
Dukakis. 



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Against the motion : Trustees Baker, Batiste, Burack, Crain, 
McNulty, Shearer and Troy; Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding and Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin. Ayes — twelve; 
nays — nine. 

MOTION CARRIED. 

Trustee Marks asked the privilege of stating the impli- 
cations inherent in the foregoing vote: 1) that the vote validated 
the process of long-range planning; 2) that there remains some 
disagreement on some of the assumptions which will require resolu 
tion; and 3) that the process of resolution will include input 
from all the constituent groups of the University family. Presi- 
dent Wood said that in his letter transmitting the assumptions to 
the campuses, he would make those points. 

Trustee Batiste requested that a joint meeting of the 
Committees on Faculty and Educational Policy and Long-Range Plan- 
ning be called to discuss this matter further. President Wood 
said it was his understanding that the discussion would take place: 
in a meeting of the full Board. Trustee Batiste asked if this 
discussion would take place on June 20 at Parkman House. Trustee 
Gordon said it was his understanding that the meeting at the 
Parkman House was for the purpose of dealing with Board procedures 
and not substantive issues. Chairman Healey said that Trustee 
Gordon's understanding was absolutely correct that the June 20 
meeting would deal with Board procedures and responsibilities. 

Trustee Baker said that in the context of long-range 
planning she was requesting the Chairman's permission to forward 
to Board members two statements from the student body of the 
Boston campus, outlining their concerns regarding the future of 
the University, one from The Coalition for Student Rights and the 
other from the Student Activities Committee. Chairman Healey 
said the Board would be happy to receive the statements from the 
students . 



Chairman Healey turned to the report of the Committee 
on Budget and Finance and, in the absence of Trustee Carlson, 
asked Trustee Spiller to report on the April 20 meeting. Trustee 
Spiller said that the minutes of the meeting were detailed and, 
therefore, he would, in the interest of time, try to be as brief 
as possible. He said the President had commented earlier on the 
status of the FY 1978 budget request and the FY 1977 budget and 
related issues, which had also been discussed at the Budget and 
Finance meeting. He said the Committee had heard a report from 
Standish, Ayer & Wood, investment counsel, and had accepted their 
recommendation for some small changes in investment holdings. 
The Committee had then discussed the issue of its investments in 
corporations operating in South Africa and its protectorates. 
Treasurer Johnson reviewed the letter which had been sent to each 
corporation in which the University has invested and circulated 



Board 
5/4/77 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Statements of 
Student Concerns 



Report of Com- 
mittee on Budget 
and Finance 



-13- 



42' > 


Board 


5/4/77 


Discussion of 


South African 


Investments 


and Appoint- 


ment of Sub- 


committee to 


make Recom- 


mendations 



UM/Amherst — 
Fee Increases 
(Doc. T77-053A) 



UM/Amherst — 
UMBA Residence 
Hall Fee 
Increases 
(Doc. T77-100) 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Student Fees 
(Doc. T77-085) 



UM/Boston — 
Health Services 
Fee 



t - 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the only response to date. Mr. Johnson and Vice President Simmons 
outlined the efforts they have been making to get information 
about the extent of corporate involvement in South Africa and 
noted the difficulty in obtaining detailed and accurate data. 
After further discussion, he said, Chairman Carlson had proposed 
that a subcommittee be established to review the portfolio hold- 
ings on a case-by-case basis and to recommend any changes they 
felt should be made in the investment policy and any divestiture 
action which should be considered on the basis of their review. 

The Committee next discussed the matter of New Fees and 



Fee Increases — UM/Amherst, UM/Boston and UM/Worcester , he said, 



and asked Trustee Shearer, Chairman of the Committee on Student 
Affairs, which had discussed the substantive issues involved, to 
comment. Trustee Shearer said that the Committee had discussed 
the fee increases and new fees and had been satisfied that they 
were reasonable and justified. She said that last year a mandatory 
health fee for part-time students had been approved for a one-yeai 
trial basis. The Committee, she said, had reviewed this matter 
and recommended the continuation of the fee. Trustee Spiller ther. 
called for the fee votes. 



On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : 



To approve fee increases for UM/Amherst as 
set forth in Doc. T77-053A with the exception 
of the proposed establishment of the Institute 
for Man and Environment Research Services 
Trust Fund and the Instructional Trust Fund. 



and 



VOTED : 



and further 



VOTED 



and also 



VOTED 



To recommend to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority that the increases in the 
rates and charges for Building Authority projects 
on the Amherst campus, as set forth in Doc. T77- 
100, be approved, effective commencing with the 
beginning of the 1977-1978 academic year. 



To approve the new fees and fee increases 
proposed by UM/Boston, outlined in Doc. T77- 
085, with the exception of the Compulsory 
Health Insurance Fee for Foreign Students- 



That all part-time graduate and undergraduate 
students at the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston be required to pay a health service 
fee in the amount of 50 percent of the health 



I 



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-14- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

service fee required of full-time students; 
further, that full-time graduate students be 
required to pay the same health service fee 
required of full-time undergraduate students. 
The Chancellor of the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston shall be and is hereby authorized 
in extraordinary cases to waive the fee to be 
paid by part-time graduate and undergraduate 
students at his discretion. 

and in addition 

VOTED : To approve the increased schedules of rental fees 
for the housing program provided through the 
Housing Trust Fund at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Worcester; provided , that rents for un- 
furnished, single rooms shall range from $70 to 
$90, for furnished, single rooms from $80 to $100, 
and for one bedroom apartments from $163 to $173, 
in accordance with the value-point system in 
effect in the housing program. 



4297 



Board 
5/4/77 



and finally 



VOTED : 



To approve a Student Health Service Fee of $100 
per student, with an additional fee of $75 to 
cover all dependents of a student, at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Worcester. 



The Committee, said Mr. Spiller, next considered the mad- Need-based 



UM/Worcester — 
Increase in 
Student Housing 
Fees 



UM/Worcester — 
Student Health 
Service Fee 



ter of the Need-based Tuition Waiver Policy (Doc. T76-071), also 
discussed by Student Affairs; and that Committee had approved its 
extension for two more years. After hearing the report of the 
Student Affairs Committee, he said, the Committee on Budget and 
Finance also recommended the extension of these waivers. On 
motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To extend for the academic years 197 7-1978 and 
1978-1979, the need-based tuition waiver policy 
as approved by the Board on May 5, 1976, and 
contained in Trustee Document T76-071; further, 
to direct the Financial Aid Offices to include 
amounts of tuition waived and profiles of waiver 
recipients in their semi-annual reports to the 
Committee on Student Affairs on Admissions and 
Financial Aid; and further, to direct the Financial 
Aid Offices to report to the Board immediately in 
the event that drastic changes in federal or state 
financial aid funding warrant reconsideration of 
the policy. 

The next item considered by the Committee, he said, was 
the Establishment of Turner Endowment Fund (Doc. T77-088), and 



Tuition Waiver 

Policy 

(Doc. T76-071) 



-15- 



4293 



Board 
5/4/77 



Establishment 
of Turner 
Endowment Fund 
(Doc. T77-088) 



UM/ Wo re ester — 

Group Practice 

Fringe Benefit 

Report 

(Doc. T77-090) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

after a brief discussion the Committee had recommended favorably 
on this item. On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To accept the bequest of $31,056.36 under the 
will of Howard A. Turner, Class of 1912, and 
establish a memorial Endowment Fund with the 
income earned during the previous fiscal year 
to be transferred to the Chancellor's Special 
Trust Fund, where the unrestricted income may 
be used for high priority activities as the 
Chancellor may deem to be in the best interest 
of the Amherst campus. 



The Committee had next discussed, he said, the Group 
Practice Fringe Benefit Report — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-090) . He 
asked Trustee Robertson, Chairman of the Committee on Health Af- 
fairs, which had also discussed this matter, to comment on their 
reaction to the proposed benefits. Trustee Robertson said the 
authorization for the development of the fringe benefit plan was 
approved by the Board? h e said y when it approved the Rules and 
Regulations for the operation of the Group Practice Plan, which 
stipulate that the fringe benefit plan must be approved by the 
Trustees and further that the dollar cost of the benefits cannot 
exceed 10 percent of total salary. He said that the total salary 
plus the benefits equal the total compensation of members of the 
Group Practice. The Group Practice FringeBenef its Committee, he 
said, engaged the Wyatt Company to develop the fringe benefits 
program. The program that they developed has the approval, he 
said, of the campus Fringe Benefits Committee, the Chancellor and 
the President, and the initial benefits represent a cost of from 
2 to 2.5 percent of the total salary. As the Group Practice grows 1 , 
more benefits can be provided, he said. The benefits, said Trus- 
tee Robertson, are divided into two categories, mandatory and op- 
tional. The mandatory benefits, he said, include dental coverage, 
term life insurance and long-term disability insurance. Optional 
benefits include additional life insurance coverage, a tax-sheltetfed 
annuity, coverage for educational expenses, charitable deductions 
and tax and consultation service. Should at any time the group 
practice income drop to a point where it could not cover the bene- 
fits, he said, the premiums would be borne by the Group Practice 
memb er s . 



Trustee Robertson said that after reviewing the plan in 
detail, the Committee on Health Affairs had voted to concur in the 
recommendation of the Committee on Budget and Finance that the 
Board approve the plan. Trustee Spiller then called for the vote 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor/Dean of the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester to implement the 
components of the fringe benefit program as outlined 
in Section 2 "compulsory benefits" and Section 3 



-16- 



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Board 

5/4/77 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"cafeteria benefits" as set forth in Trustee 
Document T7 7-090, pursuant to the requirements 
of Section 11F of the Rules and Regulations 
of the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School Group Practice (Trustee Document T75-144A) . 

Trustee Spiller said the Committee on Budget and Finance UM/Worcester — 
had next heard a report of progress being made on expediting bill+ AHMAC Contract 
ing and collections at the University Hospital. The campus had 
engaged the firm of AHMAC Corporation of Ardmore, Pennsylvania, 
to handle the billing procedures for the departments of Radiology 
and Pathology. The Committee, he said, had been pleased to hear 
of the results being obtained, but asked that the cost effective- 
ness of the system be monitored on a continuing basis. 



4299 



Trustee Spiller said the Committee had next discussed 
the matter of the proposed Hospital Rate Increases-UM/Worcester 



UM/Worcester — 
Hospital Rate 



(Doc. T77-089). These rate increases were included in the FY 197$ Increases 



I 



I 



revenue plan presented in March. However, at that time a 20 per- 
cent increase was projected for January 1, 1978. After consulta- 
tion with the firm of Ernst & Ernst on revenue projections, the 
campus is now requesting a 10 percent increase, effective June 1, 
1977. Although the total revenue for FY 1978 would not increase, 
the real advantage, he said, lay in being able to collect increased 
revenues earlier and thereby to project revenues more accurately. 
Also, the Federal Government may restrict rate increases in the 
near future. 

Trustee Spiller added that Mr. Eller had reported that 
the Hospital Management Board had recommended that the Chancellor 
seek the increase at the earlier date. Even with the increase, 
he said, the rates will still be below cost, and the Rate Setting 
Commission is supportive of the proposed increase in rates. Chan-' 
cellor Bulger added that one of the purposes of the rate increase 
is to spread the costs among the third-party payers so as to mini- 
mize the impact on the Commonwealth. 

Secretary Parks added that at the budget hearings it hac 
been proposed that a revolving fund be established so that the rev- 
enues collected by the Hospital would be returned to the Hospital, 
Under this system, he asked, was the rate increase still necessary. 
Also, he asked what would be the average increase in bed rates. 
Chancellor Bulger explained that the greater the revenue, the less 
the ultimate cost to the state, and that the cost for a private bed 
would increase from $155 to $170 per day. Secretary Parks said 
that since the state pays for Medicaid costs, the increase in rates 
also represents an increase in cost to the state. Chancellor 
Bulger replied that the revenues represented by Medicaid were a 
small percentage of the total revenues, approximately 8 percent. 

Ms. Bluestone said that she would abstain from the vote, 
but she wished to go on record as being opposed to the sentiment 



(Doc. T77-089) 



-17- 



4300 



Board 
5/4/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Author izat ion 
to use Blue 
Cross Current 
Financing 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T77-095) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the rate increase should be secured before July 1 because of 
a possible cap being imposed by the federal government on rate 
increases . 

Trustee Spiller asked for a vote on the rate increases, 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the University 

of Massachusetts at Worcester to seek an increase 
of hospital rates for the University Hospital 
effective June 1, 1977. The weighted average 
of the rate increases shall not exceed 10 percent: 
such rate increases to be as generally outlined 
in Trustee Document T77-089. Further, to request 
the Rate Setting Commission to approve said in- 
crease. 

Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis and Ms. 
Kaplan representing Trustee Okin opposed the motion. Trustee 
Burack and Ms. Bluestone, representing Trustee Fielding, abstainec 
from the vote. 

Trustee Spiller said the next item discussed by the 
Committee was a request from Chancellor Bulger for Authorization 
to use Blue Cross Current Financing . It was possible under the 
terms of the contract, he said, to request an advance of funds to 
finance pending claims. There was no opposition to this proposal 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the Worcester 
campus under the provisions of the current 
Blue Cross contract to take the necessary 
procedural remedies in order to assure current 
financing of patient service claims incurred 
on the account of Massachusetts Blue Cross 
Incorporated. 

Trustee Spiller said that concluded the business of the 
April 20 meeting. The Committee, he said, had met again on the 
morning of the Board meeting, and at that meeting had recommended 
the approval of Fund Transfers Among Subsidiary Accounts — UM/ 
Boston (Doc. T77-095) . Secretary Parks asked the purpose of the 
transfer. Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and Control, replied 
that the money was being transferred from the heating account, 
where savings had been realized, to cover the cost of the cost-of- 
living adjustments. Also, he said, $25,000 to $30,000 was being 
transferred to cover some vacant positions on the campus police 
force, at the heating and chiller plants, and in the secretarial 
staff. There being no objections, on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To approve the fund transfers among subsidiary 
accounts at the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, as detailed in Trustee Document T77-095. 



-18- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Spiller said the Committee had next considered 
a Collective Bargaining Agreement Between the University of Massa- 



4301 



chusetts and Local 432, Unit B, The International Brotherhood of 
Police Officers — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-098) . The Committee, he 



said, recommended the approval of this agreement. 

Professor Sulzner expressed the view that this was a 
basically symbolic vote since no money had been transferred to the 
University's account to pay the cost-of-living adjustments repre- 
sented by the agreements already ratified. He said he felt the 
Board of Trustees and the University administration were being un- 
fairly blamed for the fact that no increases had been received. 
He said he did not believe the Trustees should allocate the money 
until it had been transferred to the University account. However, 
he said, Secretary Parks had indicated in January that there woulc 
not be a problem with the transfers, that people would be getting 
their money. He said that people at the University had gone 
thirty-six months without a pay increase and he felt that was in- 
excusable. He said he was not certain whether the blame lay with 
the Legislature or the Governor's Office, he suspected with the 
latter, but it had been six months since the pay increase was 
authorized, and the money had not yet been transferred. 



Secretary Parks responded that at first the position 
taken by the Governor and the Secretary of Administration and Fi- 
nance was that money in the salary reserve accounts of the univer- 
sities and colleges would be replaced as required, but that up- 
front money would not be provided. The second position taken, he 
said, was that Secretary Buckley would release the money up front, 
if the institutions would allow the state Office of Employee Rela^ 
tions to handle all the collective bargaining for the various col- 
leges and universities. Secretary Buckley would have agreed to 
release the money, he said, but he was then told by the Legislature 
that to release the money required legislative action. As a resuljt. 
he said, the matter was now with the Ways and Means Committee. 
He said that he understood it might now require a conference com- 
mittee of the two houses before the funds could be released, but 
the administration had agreed to its release. 



On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement between Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts and Local 432, Unit 
B, The International Brotherhood of Police 
Officers (Command Of ficers) , (Doc. T77-098) ; 
provided, however, that no wage increases as 
specified in said Agreement shall become effective 
until the Governor has transferred sufficient 
funds to the University's maintenance accounts to 
meet the cost of the salary increases provided by 
said Agreement. 



Board 
5/4/77 

UM/Amherst — 
Collective 
Bargaining 
Agreement with 
Local 432, 
Unit B, The 
International 
Brotherhood of 
Police Officers 
(Doc. T77-098) 



-19- 



4*32 



Board 
5/4/77 

Report of 
Committee 
on Student 
Affairs 



Report of 
Committee 
on Health 
Affairs 

Establishment 
of Primary 
Teaching 
Practice in 
Uxbridge 
(Doc. T77-093) 



Report of 
Committee 
on Faculty 
and Educa- 
tional Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey next called on Trustee Shearer to 
report. Trustee Shearer said that the Committee on Student Af- 
fairs had recommended action on the student fees and the need- 
based tuition waiver policy, but that the Board actions on these 
matters had been taken under the report of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance. She said that the matter of the Athletic Tuition 
Waivers had not been forwarded to the Committee on Budget and Fi- 
nance and that there would be further consideration of this mat- 
ter next month. The minutes which had been distributed, she said, 
reported fully the Committee's deliberations. 

Chairman Healey asked next for the report of the Commit- 
tee on Health Affairs. Trustee Robertson said that the minutes 
of this meeting were also complete but that in addition to the 
action already taken during the report of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance, his Committee did have one further recommendation to 
the Board, which was the establishment of a Primary Teaching Prac- 
tice in Uxbridge (Doc. T77-093) . In 1975, he said, a group of 
citizens in the Blackstone Valley had approached the University 
to see if an arrangement could be made whereby the University 
could provide physicians to this underserved area. The community 
will provide the facility and the University will provide the 
physicians for the Tri-River Family Health Center. Action is re- 
quired to authorize the Chancellor to submit a certificate of 
need and other preliminary requirements as provided in the pro- 
posed vote. On motion made and seconded, it was then 



VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the Medical Center 
to submit together with the Tri-River Family 
Health Center Development Corporation a Determina- 
tion of Need Application to the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health and to conduct such 
negotiations as are necessary to establish a 
primary care teaching practice in Uxbridge, 
Massachusetts, as set forth in Doc. T77-093; 
provided, however, that the Trustees shall review 
said program prior to the Chancellor signing any 
contract with the Tri-River Family Health Center 
Development Corporation on behalf of the Medical 
Center. 

Following this action, Chairman Healey said that he 
apologized for having to leave the meeting for another appoint- 
ment. At the Chairman's request, Trustee Dennis assumed the 
chair. Trustee Dennis asked for the report of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy reported that the 
Committee had met on April 22, and first considered requests from 
the Collegiate Committee on Resources of the College of Liberal 
Arts at UM/Boston and the faculty of the College of Arts and 
Sciences at UM/Amherst to meet with the Committee regarding their 
concerns about the allocation of resources and the role of libera!. 
arts in the University. The Committee will be meeting with these 



■20- 



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4303 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

groups on May 10, he said. The Committee then on roll call went 
into executive session to discuss some personnel matters. At the 
conclusion of the executive session, said Trustee Troy, the Com- 
mittee had recommended two actions. The first, he said, was a 
matter of concurrence in the Appointment of Dr. Douglas Vickers 
as Professor of Economics with Tenure — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-091) . 



Trustee Burack, he said, had been opposed to this vote because 
she is unalterably opposed to initial or early tenure appointment 
as a matter of principle and believes it is unfair to junior fac- 
ulty and, therefore, detrimental to faculty morale. Trustee Troy 
reported that Trustee Crain, although he voted for the motion, 
also had expressed some reservations, expressing particular concern 
for the lack of sensitivity to the need for affirmative action in 
such fields as economics, where in the past few women have tended 
to major. He had said there was a need for more role models, 
especially in senior positions. 

Trustee Burack asked to know what the agreed upon salary 
was and to be assured that no state funds and no trust funds were 
being used to pay for moving expenses of the above appointee. 
Provost Puryear said his salary was within the professorial salary 
range and that the practice of the University has been to pay mov- 
ing expenses when appropriate. Trustee Burack asked that an opin- 
ion be obtained from counsel as to the legality of paying such 
expenses . 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 



VOTED : To concur in the appointment by the President 
of Douglas Vickers as Professor of Economics 
with tenure at the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst, as set forth in Trustee Document 
T77-091. 

Trustee Burack asked to be recorded in opposition for 
the reasons stated by Trustee Troy, above. 

Trustee Troy said the second action concerned a Waiver 
of Sabbatical Leave Requirement — UM/Boston. Under the University 
Sabbatical Leave Policy, a faculty member is required to return 
for at least one year of service following the leave. Professor 
Suzanne Gassner, who had postponed her sabbatical leave for one 
year at the request of the Dean, has requested a waiver of the 
requirement. The campus administration has recommended that it is 
in the best interest of the University and Professor Gassner that 
the waiver be granted. On motion made and seconded, it was 



Board 
5/4/77 

UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Dr. Douglas 
Vickers as 
Professor of 
Economics with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T77-091) 



VOTED : To waive the requirement that Professor Suzanne 
Gassner return to the University on completion 
of her sabbatical leave on August 31, 197 7. 

Trustee Troy said the Committee had next considered a 



-21- 



UM/Boston — 
Waiver of 
Sabbatical 
Leave Policy 



4304 



Board 
5/4/77 

UM/ Boston — 
Change of 
Name of 
College of 
Liberal Arts 
to College of 
Arts and 
Sciences 
(Doc. T77-084) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

request for Renaming the College of Liberal Arts — UM/Boston (Doc. 
T77-084) to the College of Arts and Sciences. Both the faculty 
and the Dean felt the proposed name more accurately describes the 
scope and nature of the college and more clearly indicates that all 
the sciences are in the unified college. The proposal also has the 
approval of the Assembly and the Chancellor, he said. On motion 
made and seconded, it was 



Master 
Planning 



Basic 
Education 



VOTED : To redesignate the College of Liberal Arts at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston as 
the College of Arts and Sciences, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-084. 

Trustee Troy said the Committee had also had a long dis- 
cussion of Master Planning but he would not try to summarize it 
at the Board meeting. 

Trustee Troy said that the final agenda item had been a 
report from the Amherst campus on the Rhetoric program there. 
Since the Committee had still to hear from the College of Public 
and Community Service at UM/Boston on this subject, he said, he 
would wait until the next meeting to summarize the reports and 
responses to "the eternally interesting subject of Freshman Eng- 
lish." 

Trustee Troy said he was proposing action on one other 
item — the Preliminary May 1, 1977 Graduation Lists — UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T77-099). The only lists compiled to date, he said, were 
the doctoral lists. Final examinations had not yet been held, 
accounting for the fact that the other lists were not yet avail- 
able. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary doctoral graduation 
lists for May 1977 at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T77- 
099, subject to the completion of all require- 
ments as certified by the Recorder of that campus. 

Trustee Dennis called next for the report of the Commit- 
tee on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Spiller said that the Com- 
mittee had met earlier in the day primarily to discuss the Tillson 
Power Plant and options relative to that facility. He said there 
would be no request for action at this time, but the Committee 
would be providing a progress report and recommendations regarding 
both the new and old plants, he said. The Committee also reviewec 
the progress being made with regard to the library roof and the 
seawater system at UM/Boston as well as hearing a report of the 
activities of the Peninsula Planning Committee. 

Report of Ad Trustee Dennis then asked for a report of the Ad Hoc 

Hoc Committee |Committee on Reorganization. Trustee Breyer said that the Commit- 
on Reorganiza- tee had met with the students and faculty of the three campuses in 
tion 



-22- 



UM/Amherst — 

May 1977 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doctoral 

only) 

(Doc. T77-099) 



Report of 
Committee 
on Buildings 
and Grounds 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an attempt to provide a statement of the position or positions of 
the various University bodies, with the ultimate goal of develop- 
ing a consensus of the University's reactions to the reorganization 
bill, which will be forthcoming. Trustee Marks said that he had 
heard a rumor that there was a very good chance that the legisla- 
tion would be withdrawn. President Wood said that a bill to estab 
lish a legislative commission to study the various proposals on 
the reorganization of higher education had been reported out of 
the Joint Committee on Education. 



At the request of the Chairman, Trustee Troy reported 
in his role as Delegate to the Board of Higher Education that the 
BHE had moved its headquarters to the Park Square Building. 

Professor Sulzner expressed appreciation to Chairman 
Healey for having circulated to the Board a communication from 
the UM/ Amherst Faculty Senate. He said he hoped the content of 
the communication could be discussed at the next meeting of the 
Board. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 4:40 p.m. 



Board 
5/4/77 



jGladyg 



UcJZ*. 




Gladyfl Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



Report of 
Delegate 
to BHE 



■23- 



4306 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 18, 1977; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer , Burack, Carlson, Crain, Dennis, 
Gordon, Marks, McNulty, Morgenthau, Robertson, Romer, Rowland, 
Troy; Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blues tone 
representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Colby representing Trustee 
Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Trustees Absent : Trustees Anrig, Clark, McNeil, Okin, Shearer, 
and Spiller 

Office of the President : Mr. Bromery, Executive Vice President 
and Chancellor; Mr. Searson, General Counsel to the University; 
Ms. D'Esti, Associate Counsel 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. Chairman 
Healey said the meeting would immediately go into executive ses- 
sion for the purpose of discussing collective bargaining matters. 
At 10:08 a.m. it was moved, seconded and on roll call, unanimously 

VOTED : To enter into executive session to discuss 
collective bargaining matters. 

At 10:55 a.m. it was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To end the executive session 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary graduation lists 

at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
(Doc. T77-099) , subject to the completion of 
all requirements as certified by the Recorder 
of the campus. 

and also 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary graduation lists 
at the University of Massachusetts at Boston 
(Doc. T77-115), subject to the completion of 
all requirements as certified by the Recorder 
of the campus. 

and further 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst — 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T77-099) 



UM/Boston — 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T77-115) 



4308 



Board 
5/18/77 

UM/Worcester — 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

List 

(Doc. T77-116) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary graduation list at 
the University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
(Doc. T77-116) , subject to the completion of 
all requirements as certified by the Recorder 
of the campus. 

There was no further business to come before the Board, 
and the meeting was adjourned at 10:58 a.m. 



I 





Assistant (Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 1, 1977; 2:00 p.m. 
Chancellor's Conference Room 
Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Acting Chairman Carlson; President 
Wood; Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Burack, Clark, Gordon, 
Marks, McNeil, Morgenthau, Robertson, Romer , Rowland, Shearer, 
Spiller, Troy; Mr. Parks representing Trustee Dukakis; Ms. Blue- 
stone representing Trustee Fielding; Ms. Kaplan representing 
Trustee Okin; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Anrig, Crain, Dennis, Healey and 



McNulty 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Father Walsh, 
Academic Advisor to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Professor Sulzner, Professor Friedman, Profes 
sor Brogan, Faculty Representatives; Ms. Sally Rees , President, 
Graduate Student Senate; Mr. Chiz, Alumni Representative 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 
Professor Martin, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Campbell, Vice Chancellor 



for Administration and Finance; Mr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Dr. Edgar Smith, Provost; Dr. Catlin, Alternate 
Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. James O'Leary, President, UM/Boston Alumni Associa- 



4303 



tion; Mr. John O'Connell, Director, UM/Amherst Associate Alumni 

The meeting was called to order in the absence of the 
Chairman by Acting Chairman Carlson at 2:40 p.m. 

The first item of agenda was the consideration of the 
minutes of two previous meetings, the regular meeting held on May 
4 and the special meeting held on May 18. On motion made and sec- 
onded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the meetings of 
May 4 and May 18, 1977. 

Acting Chairman Carlson next introduced Mr. James O'Leaity, Introduction of 



Approval of 
Minutes of 
Prior Meetings 



4310 



Board 
6/1/77 

UM/Boston 

Alumni 

Representative 

President' s 
Remarks 



UM/Amherst — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Chancellor' s 
Remarks 

UM/Worcester- 
Chancellor ' s 
Remarks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President of the UM/Boston Alumni Association, who is the repre- 
sentative to the Board from the UM/Boston alumni. 

Acting Chairman Carlson then asked President Wood to 
inform the Board members of the status of the FY 1978 budget re- 
quest. President Wood said that the House Committee on Ways and 
Means had recommended a total University budget of $121.13 mil- 
lion, representing an increase of 12 percent over last year's 
budget. This is a larger increase than recommended for any of 
the other segments by a factor of 2.5, he said, and would be more 
than a survival budget. 

Another piece of good news, he continued, was that due 
to the work of the congressional delegation, and especially Con- 
gressman Harrington, the University and its sister universities 
and colleges had received an appropriation of $10.3 million for 
Project Isabella, a high energy physics project located at Brook- 
haven. This should greatly strengthen the capacity of the respec- 
tive physics departments to work in that area, he said. 

President Wood, upon the conclusion of his remarks, 
asked for comment by the Chancellors. 

Chancellor Bromery reported that of the 6100 graduates, 
between 5000 and 5500 attended the commencement exercises on 
Saturday, May 20. Between 17,000 and 18,000 friends and relative4 
also attended, and among the graduates was Bill Cosby. He said 
his second news item was the status of alumni contributions, which 
he would ask John O'Connell, Director of the Alumni Association, 
to report. By means of graphs, Mr. O'Connell indicated the growth 
in Alumni contributions from $82,214 in 69-70 to $241,582 in 75- 
76, stating that he expected contributions received this year 
would exceed $300,000. The number of donors in 69-70, he said, 
was 5,662, as compared with 11,246 in 75-76, and an anticipated 
total of 13,000 this year. He indicated that the growth rate of 
the Annual Fund at the University of Massachusetts exceeded that 
of four of the other New England public institutions. He then 
compared University alumni contributions with those of Boston 
University. Although BU surpassed the University in the amount 
of dollars collected, the University compared favorably in the 
number of donors. 

Chancellor Golino then reported that UM/Boston would 
graduate 1039 students on Thursday, 825 of whom were expected to 
attend . 

Chancellor Bulger said he felt he should announce that 
all 39 of UM/Worcester graduates showed up at commencement on 
Saturday and a record number of friends and relatives jammed the 
Library. He said he also wanted the Trustees to know that Provosi 
Edgar Smith had been one of six people in the country chosen from 
nominees put forward, one from each academic health center, to 



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4311 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

receive a Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, which will begin in 
September. He will spend a year in Washington, D.C., working on 
legislation that will benefit medical schools, after which he 
will return to the campus. 



Acting Chairman Carlson then asked for the reports of 
the standing committees, reporting first for the Executive Commit-j- 
tee in the absence of Chairman Healey. The first item considered 
by the Executive Committee, he said, was a Policy on Duration of 
Service of Senior University Officials (Doc. T77-125) . This mat- 
ter was advanced, he said, by Chairman Healey and stems from the 
fact that the President and the Chancellors serve at the pleasure 
of the Board and there has been in the past no specified term of 
office for them. Practices among universities and colleges vary. 
It is a particularly significant matter for the senior adminis- 
trators at the University of Massachusetts to follow a well under-r 
stood pattern, he said, since a considerable amount of importance 
has been attached to voluntary early retirement by members of the 
faculty and staff. This has been emphasized by discussions of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. The President has 
recommended to the Committee that the Board of Trustees designate 
the age of 65 as the appropriate age at which senior administrators 
relinquish their positions without prejudice to their ability to 
serve as faculty members or in some other capacity. The Executive: 
Committee, at the conclusion of its deliberations, he said, voted 
to recommend approval of this policy, with one abstention. Trus- 
tee Robertson said he wished to propose an amendment to the vote 
recommended by the Executive Committee, the amended vote to read 
as follows: 

MOVED : That the terms of Office of the President, 

Chancellors, Vice Presidents, Vice Chancellors, 
the Treasurer and the Secretary of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts shall extend no later 
than the 30th of June after they reach the age 
of 65; provided, however, that any such person 
may be appointed by the Board of Trustees to 
serve the University in another capacity subse- 
quent to the expiration of the term of office; 
further provided that any such officer having 
attained the age of 64 years shall have the 
opportunity to present to the Board of Trustees 
his or her views regarding the tenure of his or 
her appointment . 

The amendment was seconded and discussion of the amended motion 
ensued. Trustee Breyer said that he felt it important that every- 
one recognize this vote as a policy decision and that it did not 
reflect on any one person. He said that this was particularly 
important since one of the senior administrators was nearing the 
proposed retirement age. He said that in his way of thinking this 
administrator had done an excellent job and he did not wish this 



Board 
6/1/77 



Report of 
Executive 
Committee 

Policy on 
Duration of 
Service of 
Senior 
University 
Officials 
(Doc. T77-125) 



-3- 



Board 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

action to reflect on him. In this context, he said, he was in 
favor of Trustee Robertson's proposed amendment. Ms. Kaplan 
asked for clarification of the intent of the amendment. Trustee 
Robertson explained that the amendment would allow a senior ad- 
ministrator to meet with the Board to discuss his views with 
regard to his retirement. Responding to Trustee Burack's request 
for further clarification as to the purpose or end result of pro- 
viding the opportunity for a person to present his views to the 
Board, acting Chairman Carlson pointed out that since these per- 
sons serve at the pleasure of the Board and have no tenure in these 
positions, the amendment would make it possible for the Trustees 
i to exercise their discretion as to when they should cease to 
serve once they have reached the policy age. All it says, he 
continued, is that in the year before they attain the age of 65, 
they have the opportunity to present their views to the Board, 
but it is clear that the decision as to the duration of their 
service is still that of the Trustees. Trustee Rowland suggested 
substituting the word "duration" for the word "tenure" in the 
motion. There was no objection and on roll call, it was then 



VOTED ; That the terms of office of the President, 

Chancellors, Vice Presidents, Vice Chancellors, 
the Treasurer and the Secretary of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts shall extend no later 
than the 30th of June after they reach the age 
of 65; provided, however, that any such person 
may be appointed by the Board of Trustees to 
serve the University in another capacity subse- 
quent to the expiration of the term of office; 
further provided that any such officer having 
attained the age of 64 years shall have the 
opportunity to present to the Board of Trustees 
his or her views regarding the duration of his 
or her appointment. 

Trustees Baker , Batiste, Breyer, Carlson, Clark, Gordon, McNeil, 
Morgenthau, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, Spiller, Troy and Wood; 
and Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop voted for the motion. 
Trustees Burack, Marks; Ms. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding and Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin voted against 
the motion. Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis abstain 
ed. Ayes - 15; nays - 4; abstentions - 1. 
MOTION PASSED. 

Ms. Bluestone asked that the minutes record that she 
opposed the vote because she was concerned by what she considered 
to be a rather precipitous decision-making process in what she 
felt was a very important policy issue. She felt that the prob- 
lems of people who were growing older and what they were capable 
of and not capable of doing was an important discussion that the 
Board had not had. She said, as she had expressed at some length 



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4313 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the Executive Committee meeting, she could not understand why 
older people should be capable of consulting and teaching and be- 
ing colleagues, but were not capable of administering. Trustee 
Burack said she would like the record to show that she strongly 
and strenuously objected now as she had in the past to the merging 
and coalescing of specific issues and policy which, in effect, 
are backed into by this Board of Trustees in terms that relate 
really to a particular ad hoc and ad_ hominum decision. 

Acting Chairman Carlson turned to the next agenda item 
which included three actions with regard to an appointment at 
UM/Amherst and asked Chancellor Bromery to speak to the issue. 
Chancellor Bromery said that the appointment under consideration 
was proposed after a nationwide search process over a fifteen- 
month period. The nominee, he said, represented a consensus opin- 
ion, after interviewing the three top candidates. On motion made 
and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the Classification of Position Title 
as detailed in Doc. T77-110. 



and further 



VOTED 



To concur, along with the President, in the 
appointment by the Chancellor of James L. 
McBee, Jr. as Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst, as detailed in Trustee 
Document T77-108. 



and also 



VOTED : To approve the personnel action as set forth 
in Trustee Document T77-109. 



The next item of agenda, said Acting Chairman Carlson, 
was the consideration of the ratification of S.E.I.U. Collective 
Bargaining Agreement — UM/Boston (Doc. T77-122) . This agreement, 
he said, carried out the provisions previously summarized by the 
negotiating committee and appeared to be in order, and the Execu- 
tive Committee had recommended its approval. Secretary Parks 
recognizing the technicality of one provision of the vote, said 
the record should show that the Governor had already transferred 
the funds to cover the agreement and the money was available. 
On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement between the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts and Local 
285, Service Employees International Union, 
AFL-CIO, (Doc. T77-122); provided, however, 
that no wage increases as specified in said 
Agreement shall become effective until the 



-5- 



Board 
6/1/77 



UM/Amherst — 
Classification 
of Position 
Title 

(Doc. T77-110) 
UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
James L. McBee, 
Jr. as Vice 
Chancellor for 
Administration 
and Finance 

(Doc. T77-108) 

UM/Amherst — 

Personnel 

Action 

(Doc. T77-109) 

UM/Boston — 

Ratification of 

S.E.I.U. 

Collective 

Bargaining 

Agreement 

(Doc. T77-122) 



4314 



Board 
6/1/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Revised Group 
Practice Rules 
and Regulations 
(Doc. T77-121) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Governor has transferred sufficient funds to 
the University's maintenance accounts to meet 
the cost of the salary increases provided by 
said Agreement. 

Acting Chairman Carlson reported that the Executive 
Committee had next considered the report of the Health Affairs 
Committee, which had considered that morning the adoption of 
revised Rules and Regulations Relative to the Operation and Gov- 
ernance of the University of Massachusetts Medical School Group 
Practice (Doc. T77-121) . He asked Trustee Robertson, Chairman 
of that committee, to comment. These rules and regulations, said 
Trustee Robertson, had been under consideration by the Health Af- 
fairs Committee since last November. The revised regulations, 
he said, reflect a major philosophical shift away from the Group 
Practice operations being geared to individual clinicians to a 
structure paralleling the Hospital's departmental structure. The 
revised regulations, he said, provide for proportional responsi- 
bility of all plan members for repayment of debts, should there 
be any shortfall in income, and establishes effective departmental 
budgeting and operation. He said these revised regulations had 
been reviewed by the Health Affairs Committee in detail on May 17 
and, as a result of that meeting, a few changes had been made, 
which were approved by the Committee earlier this day. The Com- 
mittee in its final review, however, had discovered one error in 
the document, and the recommended vote reflected the necessary 
correction. On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the revised rules and 
regulations for the University of Massachu- 
setts Medical School Group Practice (Doc. 
T77-121) as amended by striking the word 
"net" from line 10 of Section 14, effective 
June 29, 1977 and to repeal the provisions 
of said rules and regulations established in 
Trustee Document T75-144A. 



The final agenda item for the Executive Committee, said 
Acting Chairman Carlson, was a presentation requested by the UM/ 
Amherst Senate Rules Committee in which they stated their concern 
with the observance of the governance procedures established by 
the Board of Trustees, or lack thereof, in recent months. He asked 
President Wood to comment. President Wood said that the discus- 
sion in the Executive Committee had dealt with faculty concerns 
with both the planning processes and the evaluation processes of 
administrators, as well as with the governance process in general, 
The conclusion, he said, was that there would be a continuation 
of discussions between appropriate representatives of the Rules 
Committee and the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy at selected times and places. 

Professor Sulzner, speaking on behalf of the Senate 



-6- 



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4315 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Rules Committee, said they were appreciative of the serious and 
receptive hearing they had received from the Trustees and welcomed 
the opportunity to carry on further discussions with the relevant 
policy committee of the Board. 

Acting Chairman Carlson then asked Trustee Rowland to 
report for the Committee on Long-Range Planning. Trustee Rowland 
said that the Committee had met on May 18, immediately following 
an informal discussion by the full Board of the Planning Assump- 
tions and Guidelines. In response to a suggestion from the Chair- 
man of the Board at the informal meeting, she said, the Long- 
Range Planning Committee had established a calendar and process 
for the further development of the Assumptions and Guidelines, 
which had then been forwarded to all members of the Board. In 
developing the schedule and process, she said, careful considera- 
tion was given to the concerns expressed at the informal session 
as well as at the Committee meeting. Three major concerns, she 
said, had emerged: First, it was emphasized, that the Trustees 
had the responsibility for initiating and directing the master 
planning process. The Trustee by-laws provide that this responsi- 
bility is to be exercised through the Committee on Long-Range 
Planning. Second, it was agreed that while some of the assump- 
tions and guidelines were matters of Trustee judgment, others con- 
cerned areas in which informed advice and comment from the campus- 
es would be particularly useful. She said the Committee in its 
position paper tried to suggest some examples of the distinction 
between the two so that campus review and discussion could be 
focussed on the most critical and relevant items. A series of 
seminars was proposed and incorporated into the schedule, the pur- 
pose of which would be 1) to increase general understanding of 
the process, 2) to discuss and provide supporting information on 
the assumptions and guidelines, and 3) to clarify the roles and 
responsibilities of the various participants. 

It was emphasized, said Trustee Rowland, that broad 
discussion and consultation were very important to the planning 
process, but also that the discussion and consultation must pro- 
ceed in a responsible and timely manner. Some Trustees, she said, 
were more concerned with consultation and some, with time, and 
the schedule and process developed was an attempt to compromise 
and reconcile these two concerns. 

Campus and Trustee review of the Assumptions and Guide- 
lines, she said, would continue through the summer and a report 
on the comments by the campuses would be submitted by August 1 
and would be used, together with further Trustee discussions and 
the responses to the questionnaires, in the preparation of a re- 
vised set of assumptions and guidelines for review by the Long- 
Range Planning Committee at its August 17 meeting and for subse- 
quent review by the Board. Once adopted by the Board, the Assump-j 
tions and Guidelines would be used by the campuses in the develop- 
ment of more comprehensive and detailed planning documents. The 



-7- 



Board 
6/1/77 



Report of 
Committee on 
Long-Range 
Planning 



4316 



Board 

6/1/77 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

schedule calls for this elaboration to occur from the first of 
September through the middle of December. The Chancellors, she 
continued, will be responsible for seeing that the documents re- 
ceive full review and consideration by faculty, students and 
staff. The campus documents will be used by the Planning Office 
in the preparation of the first draft of a university-wide master 
plan, which will be presented to the Committee on Long-Range 
Planning. It is expected that the draft plan will be ready for 
Committee review by January 30 and for campus review during Febru- 
ary and March. If campus comments are available by April, and it 
is mandatory that they are, Trustee review and revision will take 
place in April and May, and the master plan should be ready for 
Board action by June, 1978. Trustee Rowland said it was hoped that 
this schedule could be met. She said she was concerned lest new 
Legislation take not only the schedule but the substance of plan- 
ning for the University out of the hands of the Trustees. She 
said the Committee on Long-Range Planning would stay close to the 
planning process and she hoped and expected that in August, the 
Board members would participate in the process of education, dis- 
cussion and revision as they had indicated was their wish. 

Campus Responses Continuing her report, Trustee Rowland said at the con- 

to the Report elusion of discussion on master-planning, the Committee dis- 
cussed briefly the Campus Responses to the Report of the Advisory 
Council on the Fine Arts. The most recent responses, she said, 



of the Advisory 
Council on the 
Fine Arts 



Report of 
Committee on 
Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 



included estimates of the cost of responding to the Council's 
recommendations. The discussion highlighted the continuing prob- 
lem of balance — between the art departments serving the majors 
and other undergraduates, between the visual and the performing 
arts, between UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, as well as general budget 
limitations. She said she had been frustrated by the difficulty 
in reaching closure on the Council's recommendations and she 
hoped a meeting of the Committee in the fall could be substantial 
ly devoted to this subject. Because of the lateness of the hour, 
she said, the discussion of the Report of the Multicampus Subcom- 
mittee on Continuing Education had been postponed to a future 



meeting. 

Trustee Burack applauded the expansion of the planning 
process to include the campuses, but questioned how realistic the 
schedule really was, considering the fact that faculty and stu- 
dents were on vacation for the summer. Trustee Rowland replied 
that the schedule had been prepared in response to the wishes 
expressed by the Board and that if a master plan was to be in 
place in a year, everyone would just have to try hard to meet the 
schedule. 

Acting Chairman Carlson called next for the report of 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy 
reported that the Committee had met on May 25, at which time it 
discussed its response to the special meeting held on May 10, 
when the Committee had heard presentations from the Committees 



-8- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4317 



Board 
6/1/77 



Arts & Science 
Faculties, 
UM/ Amherst and 
UM/Boston 



on Arts and Sciences from both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston. 

These committees, he said, wished to express their con- Report of 
cerns, particularly the committee from UM/Boston, over what appeaif- Meeting with 
ed at that time to be a threat of serious cuts in their budgets, 
which they felt would radically weaken their capacity to carry on 
and do their work effectively. At the beginning of this discus- 
sion, he said, President Wood commented on the status of the first 
phase of the budgetary talks at the State House. He pointed out 
that the University was likely to receive reasonably strong sup- 
port this year and thus the threats that seemed to loom so darkly 
and that had kindled faculty fears and suspicions had been largely 
dissipated. 

In addition to budgetary concerns, he said, the faculty 
group from UM/Boston stressed the importance of faculty partici- 
pation as an on-going process in planning for the campus as well 
as for the total University. They requested assurance from the 
Trustees that the campus would have two years of stability in 
which the campus could study, review and evaluate the whole range 
of their programs. They were not interested in growth in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, he said, and they fully accept the neec. 
for steady growth and expansion in the other two colleges, which 
have not yet reached the point of efficient and balanced operations, 
There is need for a period of stability after the recent merger of 
the two liberal arts colleges. The campus Committee on Long-Range 
Planning, he said, was chaired by Professor Brown of the History 
Department and included faculty, students and administrators. It 
expects to report on its early findings and to make recommendatioiJLs 
in December of this year. 

The UM/Amherst faculty group, said Trustee Troy, had 
somewhat related concerns, but the emphasis was different. The 
major spokesman for this group, he said, was Dean Shapiro of the 
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Their concerns, he 
said, were the result of discontent stemming from the first-stage 
document describing the five-year campus plan. The faculty has 
questioned the reliability of the data used, he said, and the 
criteria for evaluating university education, which could not, 
they said, be brought under a narrowly quantitative concept. The 
central concern of the Amherst committee, he said, was that the 
faculty have a genuine on-going place in the planning process . A 
faculty committee for planning has been formed in the hope that 
this will become the means for fuller communication between fac- 
ulty and administration, and thereby the instrument for continuing 
faculty engagement in the planning process. 

Trustee Troy said that, as with the Boston faculty, the 
Amherst faculty were not opposed to growth and development in the 
professional schools even though a status quo was maintained in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. The Committee, he said, was im 4 - 
pressed by the seriousness, intelligence and distinction of the 



-9- 



431^ 



Board 
6/1/77 



UM/Amherst , 

UM/ Bos ton, and 

UM/ Wo re ester — 

Promotions to 

Tenure 

(Doc. T77-111) 



UM/Worcester — 
Merger of 
Departments of 
Community and 
Family Medicine 
and Family 
Practice 
(Doc. T77-107) 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

faculty who came before it and felt that their moderate and sensi- 
ble requests should be given encouragement. 

Trustee Troy reported that the Committee had next con- 
sidered Promotions to Tenure — UM/Amherst, UM/Boston and UM/ 
Worcester (Doc. T77-111) . He said that of 43 faculty members at 
UM/Amherst considered initially for tenure, 28 were granted tenure 
and that about 65 percent of the faculty are now tenured. The 
number of cases considered this year, he said, was much lower than 
a year ago when 73 persons were recommended and tenure was grantee, 
to 60. 

At UM/Boston, said Trustee Troy, 16 cases were reviewed, 
13 were recommended by the Chancellor, 11 were recommended to the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy and 2 were still un- 
decided. Three people from UM/Worcester were recommended for 
tenure and three were awarded tenure. Of the total of 42 promo- 
tions to tenure, he said, 4 were women and 7 were members of minor 
ity groups. On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To concur in the President's award of tenure 
to those faculty members named in Doc. T77- 
111 and the addenda thereto, at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, Boston and Worcester. 

Chancellor Bromery commented that one of the tenure awards at UM/ 
Amherst had been given posthumously. It had been the sentiment 
on campus that the recipient had earned tenure and therefore the 
award had been made. 

Trustee Troy said the Committee had next considered a 
request from the Medical School for the Merger of the Departments 
of Community and Family Medicine and Family Practice — UM/Worcester 
(Doc. T77-107) . When merged they will form the Department of 
Family and Community Medicine. Four years ago, said Trustee Troy 
the two departments were separated and the results were unsatis- 
factory for everyone concerned. The Chairman of this department 
will be Dr. Robin Catlin, whose memorandum explains the issues 
and problems involved. The Committee, he said, had felt that the i 
merger was not only sensible, but indispensible, and it had 
the concurrence of the Health Affairs Committee. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the merger of the Departments of 
Community and Family Medicine and of Family 
Practice into the Department of Family and 
Community Medicine at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Worcester as set forth in Doc. 
T77-107. 

Trustee Troy said the Committee had then discussed a 
proposal from the Medical School for the Establishment of Depart - 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

merit of Neurology — UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-112) . Neurology, he 
said, was a department vital to all good Medical Schools and 
particularly to UM/Worcester because of its relationships with 
the other Health Service programs in the state. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish a Department of Neurology at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester as 
set forth in Doc. T77-112. 

The Committee next considered two appointments, one at 
UM/Boston and one at UM/Amherst. The Board was being asked, he 
said, to give its Concurrence in the Appointment of Dr. Michael P 



Riccards as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences — UM/Boston 
(Doc. T77-114). Chancellor Golino commented that Dr. Riccards 
had been the unanimous first choice of the search committee, afte 
a long and thorough search, and both he and the Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs had concurred with their selection of Dr. 
Riccards. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur with the President in the appointment 
by the Chancellor of Michael P. Riccards as Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Boston as set forth 
in Doc. T77-114. 

The Board, said Trustee Troy, was also being asked for its Con- 
currence in the Appointment of Dr. Charles Bestor as Professor of 



I 



Music and Dance with Tenure — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-113) . Dr. 
Bestor, he said, was a distinguished composer as well as a profes 
sor and administrator with wide and long-standing experience. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur in the appointment of Charles Bestor 
by the President as Professor of Music and 
Dance with tenure at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst as set forth in Doc. T77-113. 

Trustee Burack voted in opposition to the motion because of her 
conviction that no initial appointments should be accompanied by 
tenure. 

Acting Chairman Carlson asked next for the report of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Trustee Spiller said he 
would like to deviate from the agenda of the meeting to announce 
that he had been presented with a deed which required the signa- 
tures of the Trustees. He said the deed covered the transfer of 
land from the University to the General Services Administration 
for the John F. Kennedy Library. It was appropriate, he said, 
that President Wood be the first to sign, since it was chiefly 
through his efforts that the Library had come to the Boston Cam- 
pus . 



-11- 



Board 
6/1/77 

of Department 
of Neurology 
(Doc. T77-112) 



UM/Boston — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Dr. Michael P. 
Riccards as Dean 
of the College 
of Arts and 
Sciences 
(Doc. T77-114) 



UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Dr. Charles 
Bestor as 
Professor of 
Music and Dance 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T77-113) 



Report of 
Committee on 
Buildings and 
Grounds 

UM/Boston — 
Signing of 
Deed for JFK 
Presidential 
Library 



4320 



Board 
6/1/77 

UM/ Amherst — 
Anti-pollution 
Renovation of 
Coal-fired 
Boiler Plant 
(Doc. T77-120) 



Design and 
Construction 
Responsibil- 
ities: the 
University 
and BBC 



UM/Amherst — 
Handicapped 
Access for 
Brett House 
Dormitory 
(Doc. T77-119) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Spiller then reported that the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee had met on May 24. In his absence, he said, 
Trustee Dennis had chaired the meeting, and now in Trustee Dennis 
absence he, Trustee Spiller, would give the report. He said the 
Committee had first considered a proposal for an Anti-pollution 
Renovation of the Coal-fired Boiler Plant — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77- 
120). The latest tests, he said, have shown that the tie lines 
for the Tillson Power Plant are more defective than earlier tests 
had shown. The Bureau of Building Construction, he said, had 
stopped all work on the tie lines and now supports renovation of 
the coal-fired plant. The Executive Office of Administration and 
Finance also supports renovation of the coal-fired plant. The 
BBC, he said, will undertake the responsibility of assigning 
liability for the defective tie lines and will report their find- 
ings in writing to the University in due course. If the Board 
agrees, work on the coal-fired plant could begin immediately and 
the Designer Selection Board could select a designer at its June 
meeting. Providing that these events occur on schedule, comple- 
tion of renovations on the coal-fired plant could be accomplished 
by the fall of 1979. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve development of a program and design 
for renovations of the coal-fired boiler plant 
at UM/Amherst to meet fly ash emission standards. 

The next topic of discussion, said Trustee Spiller, had 
been Design and Construction Responsibilities: the University 
and the BBC . Since 1956, he said, the BBC had administered $100 
million of construction projects at the Amherst campus. They are 
required to select the lowest responsible and eligible bidder. 
The University has input on the design and selection process only 
It does not have control over the construction process. However, 
he said, the public assumes that the University is responsible if 
something goes wrong. He said there were several ways of resolv- 
ing this problem: one way would be to set up a separate building 
authority for public higher education; another would be to battle 
BBC, neither of which would be in the best interests of the Uni- 
versity; a third way would be to identify the present limitations 
of the present structure and try to improve upon them. The last 
was the route the Committee chose to go. The President's Office 
agreed to develop a statement and to submit some recommendations 
to the Committee for their consideration. 

Trustee Spiller said the next matter discussed by the 
Committee was Handicapped Access for Brett House Dormitory — UM/ 
Amherst (Doc. T77-119) . He said the Committee was agreeable to 
the proposed renovations to bring this building into compliance 
with the regulations of the Architectural Barriers Board; however 
concern was expressed about the long-term financial implications 
of compliance with these regulations and possible new regulations 
of HEW. It was understood, he said, that these implications would 
be spelled out in detail before further renovations were proposed,. 



I 



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-12- 



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1 



UNIVERSITY OF 

A motion was made and seconded. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



1 



I 



President Wood said that he and Trustee Troy, a member 
of the Building Authority, had met with other members of the 
Building Authority. The Building Authority expressed their con- 
cern, also, on the long-range implications of this program. The 
Authority, he said, was reluctant to authorize expenditures until 
such time as state and federal resources to aid in renovations 
were determined. He said the University had promised to report 
back to the Building Authority at the earliest possible date on 
funding sources. The vote, he said, was important as an indica- 
tion of the University's awareness of the problem and that it was 
attempting to address it. Chancellor Bromery said the Five Col- 
lege Consortium had discussed whether a combined plan might be 
beneficial to all. The motion on the floor was then 

VOTED ; To authorize and request the concurrence of the 
Building Authority in the renovation of Brett 
House dormitory to provide full access for handi- 
capped residents, in accordance with plans and 
specifications developed and approved by the 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst ; and, to 
request that the Building Authority make available 
funds from construction balances or other Building 
Authority accounts to cover the cost of renovations 
to Brett House dormitory to provide full access 
for handicapped residents, as set forth in Doc. 
T77-119. 

The next agenda item, said Trustee Spiller, was the 
matter of JFK Library Administrative Agreements (Doc. T77-118) . 
These easements and agreements covered such items as utilities, 
roads and parking necessary for the construction of the Library. 
On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to enter into memoranda 
of agreement with the John F. Kennedy Library 
Corporation and the General Services Administration 
concerning the construction and operation of the 
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, and further 
to authorize the President to grant certain road, 
parking, drain and utility easements required for 
the construction and operation of the Library, as 
outlined on the attached map, said agreements and 
easements to be subject to approval by the General 
Counsel of the University, as set forth in Doc. 
T77-118. 

The last item of agenda for the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds, said Trustee Spiller, was an Update on various items 
of concern to the Committee. He said the Committee heard a report 
on the progress of the development of the Peninsula and learned 



4321 



Board 
6/1/77 



JFK Library 
Adminis tr at ive 
Agreements 
(Doc. T77-118) 



Update on 
Various Projects 



-13- 



4322 



Board 
6/1/77 



Report of 
Committee on 
Student Affairs 

Intercollegiate 
Athletic 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T77-101) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that modernization of the Housing Project at Columbia Point was 
scheduled to begin in June. Columbia Point and parts of Dorches- 
ter are now high on the priority list for funding from the City. 
With regard to the physical education building, Counsel, he said, 
had advised that this issue is nearing resolution. Counsel Bench 
said that although the trial date had not been set, the court had 
indicated that it should be set within a week or so. At the re- 
quest of the Trustees, Trustee Spiller said, UM/Amherst undertook 
a study of student housing, to be completed in three phases. The 
study of the management of the dormitories has been completed, an 
assessment of the physical condition of the dormitories is under- 
way by an outside consultant with anticipated completion in Octo- 
ber. The cost of renovation is yet to be determined. The final 
item, he said, dealt with the bus system at UM/Amherst. As au- 
thorized by the Board, the campus has completed a capital grant 
and land use agreement for the operation of a campus bus system. 

Acting Chairman Carlson announced that the deed circu- 
lated earlier had been signed by the Trustees and must now be 
notarized by the Assistant Secretary. The Secretary ascertained 
that all Trustees had signed the agreement of their own free will 
and the Assistant Secretary attested to this fact. President 
Wood commented on the critical role played by Ms. Robinson, Vice 
President for Planning, and the staff of the Planning Office in 
the successful conclusion of this matter. 

Acting Chairman Carlson asked next for the report of 
the Committee on Student Affairs. Trustee Shearer reported that 
at its meeting of May 24, after a few opening remarks by Presi- 
dent Wood, the Committee had "tackled" the problem of Intercol- 
legiate Athletic Tuition Waivers (Doc. T77-101). She said a 
lengthy discussion, as had been anticipated, followed presenta- 
tions by George Richarson of the Associate Alumni and John Eller, 
Associate Vice President for University Policy. She then summa- 
rized the main points of the discussion. The Board of Trustees 
had previously voted its support in the development of an inter- 
collegiate athletic program representative of the best efforts of 
the University. This previous action of the Board was one of the 
contributing factors leading to the submission of the proposal 
by the Associate Alumni. If the athletic tuition waivers are ap- 
proved, alumni funds would be released for support of other stu- 
dent activities, since the financial needs of these students 
would be met in part by the tuition waivers. Although this may 
be viewed as a trade-off, the University would benefit by addi- 
tional support from the alumni. Any expected revenues from gate 
receipts and TV coverage, particularly of football games, is 
dependent upon having a competitive team. Athletic tuition waiv- 
ers will enable the University to attract academically eligible 
students with strong athletic ability. 

Trustee Shearer said that Trustee Crain, who had not 
been present at the May 24 meeting, had written a letter stating 



■14- 



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1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

his concerns. The Committee felt that these concerns had been 
addressed during the discussion period. At its August meeting, 
she said, the Committee would review the entire tuition waiver 
policy, including the matter of tuition waivers for residence 
hall counselors. They would also, she said, review a possible 
new category which would recognize students who have given signif- 
icant service or contribution to the University. The Committee 
on Student Affairs had voted to recommend that the Committee on 
Budget and Finance recommend to the Board of Trustees approval of 
these waivers . 

Trustee Shearer said that the Committee had then dis- 
cussed Admissions, Student Aid, and what has come to be a contin- 
uing discussion on Student Support Services at UM/Boston. Except 
for the last item, she said, reports were submitted from the cam- 
puses , and she urged the members of the Board to take the time to 
read this material. One of the concerns raised, she said, in the 
discussion of admissions was the fact that the number of applica- 
tions had decreased. However, it had been noted that the number 
of applicants who had indicated their intention to actually enroll 
had increased. Therefore, the drop in applications does not mean 
a corresponding drop in enrollment. An analysis will be made of 
the application and admissions policy on each campus, she said. 

Trustee Shearer said that at the meeting of the Commit- 
tee on Budget and Finance earlier that day, the Committee had 
voted to accept the recommendation of the Committee on Student 
Affairs with regard to athletic tuition waivers and she then read 
the motion. She asked Acting Chairman Carlson to report on the 
discussion of the Budget and Finance Committee. He commented 
that there had been extensive discussion of the pros and cons of 
granting the waivers. Some Trustees had felt that it was a bad 
precedent to set in the absence of a general review of the entire 
tuition waiver policy. However, at the end of the discussion 
the Committee had voted to recommend approval of the waivers. 

Trustee Marks said that he had the feeling that at the 
meeting of the Committee on Budget and Finance they had played a 
scrimmage. He said he would like to explain his reasons for op- 
posing the motion. First, he said he felt it was not appropriate 
to consider athletic tuition waivers outside of the context of 
the total tuition waiver policy. Second, he felt that it was not 
wise to consider this matter at a time when students were not on 
campus and the Trustees could not have adequate student input. 
Third, he was concerned about the lack of guidelines, the estab- 
lishment of which he felt was a Trustee responsibility. Fourth, 
he said he thought the Trustees would be subject to adverse pub- 
licity if they approved these waivers in the current financial 
climate of the Commonwealth. Fifth, he said, if stadium bonding 
was a problem, he was willing to consider that problem on an 
issue basis but felt it was not a valid reason for granting the 
waivers. Last, he said that although the Alumni Office was doing 



4323 



-15- 



Board 
6/1/77 



4324 



Board 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an excellent job, he did not think the figures indicated that 
better teams necessarily meant greater alumni support. He felt 
the figures showed just the opposite. As the support to athletes 
went down, the amount of alumni revenue had been increasing. 
Alumni giving was largely a matter of an active Alumni Office 
rather than winning teams and he did not feel that the Alumni 
Board could speak for the some 65,000 alumni. He said he felt 
granting these waivers was unwise, to some degree discriminatory 
and an abdication of some aspects of Trustee policy. Although 
athletic tuition waivers, he said, were a legitimate part of the 
total tuition waiver policy, he felt it would be more proper to 
defer these waivers to the time of the review of the entire tui- 
tion waiver policy. 

Ms. Bluestone said that Secretary Parks had asked her 
to express for the record, since he had had to depart from the 
meeting, his concern about these waivers: "It is his feeling 
that decisions regarding tuition waivers for athletes should be 
made according to the same criteria which pertain to other stu- 
dents, be they poets, chemists or anthropologists," she said. 

Trustee Gordon said that the matter of athletic tuition 
waivers had been under study for six years before Trustee Marks 
had joined the Board. It had been reviewed recently at three 
committee meetings, and while no one suggested that it was a per- 
fect solution, he felt it was unfair to expect the University to 
compete with teams at universities similar to the University of 
Massachusetts where support was considerably greater. He said he 
felt the University should either support intercollegiate athlet- 
ics, or else it should drop them. The University, he said, had a 
tradition of intercollegiate athletics and all this proposed ac- 
tion would do would be to help to maintain the program, and it was 
a matter of survival for some of the sports in the program. He 
said having seen the numbers of students who attend football and 
basketball games, he rather doubted that students were uninterest- 
ed in their athletic teams. In 1975 the football team won eight 
of its ten games and alumni support increased considerably. The 
fact that the team was doing well created an interest which re- 
sulted in a televised broadcast of their game with Harvard, which 
in turn produced income for other activities, not just to the 
football team. He said there was no better way to advertise the 
University than to see its teams on television. 

Trustee Batiste said that although she was an avid sup- 
porter of sports on campus, she felt there had not been adequate 
discussion with regard to the waivers. She noted that various 
problems needed to be addressed including reinstating tuition 

; waivers for residence hall counselors and the requirements of 
Title IX, which meant that women's sports needed attention as wei;. 

. as football. She favored postponing the vote until August when 
the entire policy could be reviewed. Trustee Morgenthau agreed 
with this view and asked hew soon the results of the review of 



I 



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-16- 



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432, 



5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the waivers would be ready. 

Chancellor Bromery said he did not think the review 
would be complete by August, especially since the campus would 
be working over the summer on the long-range planning exercise. 
He said he had to make his operating budget allocations once the 
final budget is approved, and if the waivers were not approved, 
he would have to adjust his budget accordingly to meet the needs 
of the athletic program, including the requirements of Title IX. 
He said he could not alter the budget in August. President Wood 
added that under the tuition waiver policy approved by the Board 
in 1975, the total waivers are equivalent to $1.25 million, of 
which some $400,000 are for veterans $750,000 for graduate 
students. Residence hall counselors had received waivers for two 
years, and then it had been determined that the better way to pro 
vide assistance to this group was direct compensation. The ath- 
letic waivers, he said, would, it was hoped, be a lead action on 
a new type of tuition waiver, for exceptional service or contri- 
bution to the University. The athletic waivers being proposed 
would be equivalent to between $48,000 and $60,000. 

Trustee Burack said she thought that priorities were 
askew when Trustees were considering the granting of athletic 
tuition waivers while the Library was seriously lacking in 
books. She said she was appalled that the President was in sup- 
port of these waivers. 

Acting Chairman Carlson, noting that eloquent arguments 
had been heard on both sides of the issue, asked for action. On 
motion made and seconded, on roll call it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of UM/Amherst to 

grant 120 undergraduate athletic tuition waivers 
to Massachusetts residents as outlined in Doc. T77- 
101. 

For the motion : Trustees Breyer , Carlson, Clark, Gordon, 
Robertson, Shearer, Spiller, Troy and Wood. Against the motion : 
Trustees Baker, Batiste, Burack, Marks, Morgenthau; Ms. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding; Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee 
Okin; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop. Ayes - nine; 
nays - eight. MOTION CARRIED. 

Mr. Colby stated his reasons for voting against the 
motion. He said although he had not sat in on all the discussions 
on these waivers and although he did not fully understand how the 
tuition waiver policy worked, he was opposed to an athletic de- 
partment acting in lieu of an admissions or financial aid capacity 
He said he was well aware that a University needed all kinds of 
people to fill its athletic teams, its glee clubs, its orchestra, 
band and its dramatics, but he felt financial aid should not be 
granted without some evidence of financial need. 



-17- 



Board 
6/1/77 



4386 



Board 
6/1/77 

Report of 
Committee on 
Budget and 
Finance 

Progress Report 
of Subcommittee 
on South 
African 
Investments 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment of 
C . Thomas 
Baxter, Jr. as 
Vice Chancellor 
for Administra- 
tion and 
Finance 
(Doc. T77-096) 



Fund Transfers — 
UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T77-104A) 
UM/Boston 
(Doc. T77-105) 
UM/Worcester 
(Doc. T77-106) 



UM/Amherst — 
IME Research 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Chairman Carlson next reported for the Committee 
on Budget and Finance. The Committee, he said, had met on May 18 
and again on the morning of the Board meeting. On May 18, he 
said, the Committee had first heard from Trustee Marks a Progress 
Report of the Subcommittee on South African Investments. He re- 
ported that the Subcommittee had been collecting and reviewing 
materials relevant to the investments in the Endowment Portfolio 
in companies operating in South Africa. The Subcommittee will, 
as soon as possible, submit its recommendations in response to 
the mandate of the Trustees at their April meeting. 

The Committee, Acting Chairman Carlson said, next con- 
sidered in executive session the appointments of two vice chan- 
cellors for administration and finance. The first appointment, 
he said, had been forwarded to the Executive Committee and action 
had been taken on the appointment earlier in the meeting. 

The second appointment, he said, did not require Execu- 
tive Committee action, and he asked for Concurrence in the Ap- 
pointment of the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance — 
UM/Boston (Doc. T77-096) . On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur, along with the President, in the 
appointment by the Chancellor of C. Thomas 
Baxter, Jr. as Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston, as detailed in Trustee 
Document T77-096. 

The remainder of the May 18 meeting, he said, was de- 
voted to items largely of a housekeeping nature. First, the Com- 
mittee considered Fund Transfers — UM/Amherst, UM/Boston and UM/ 
: Worcester (Docs. T77-104A, T77-105 and T77-106 respectively). A 
revision to the UM/Amherst transfers, he said, had been considered 
at the meeting earlier in the day, and the Committee recommended 
approval of the transfers. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the fund transfers for the Amherst, 
Boston and Worcester campuses as set forth 
respectively in Trustee Documents T77-104A, 
T77-105 and T77-106. 

The Committee then considered the Establishment of New 
Trust Funds, Institute for Man and Environment Research Services 
Trust Fund (Doc. T77-102) and Instructional Trust Fund (Doc. T77- 
103), both UM/Amherst. These had been deferred from an earlier 
meeting for further legal review. The review had now been com- 
pleted and they were now being recommended to the Board. On mo- 
tion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish the Institute for Man and Environment 
Research Services Trust Fund/Amherst , which shall 



-18- 



I 



I 



I 



1 



and also 



VOTED : 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

have as a purpose the support of buildings and 
vehicles used by the National Park Research 
Unit, as more fully described in Doc. T77-102. 

Further, to adopt for FY 1978 the IME Research 
Services Fees and Revenue Schedule set forth 
in Doc. T77-102. 

Further, to authorize the transfer of any balances 
remaining in the IME Research Trust Fund Return of 
Overhead into the Institute for Man and Environment 
Research Services Trust Fund/Amherst . 



To establish the University of Massachusetts/ 
Amherst Instructional Trust Fund, which shall 
have as a purpose the providing of laboratory 
materials and supplies, and other services and 
materials incidental or ancillary to classes 
and courses offered by the Amherst Campus. 

Further, that this self-supporting trust fund 
support the purchase of said materials and 
supplies, the costs of field trips, the purchase 
of computer time and film rentals, and the funding 
of administrative services related thereto, as 
more fully described in Doc. T77-103, as well as 
other services and materials thereto; provided, 
however, that no other personnel costs nor capital 
equipment shall be supported by said trust fund. 

Further, that the Chancellor of the Amherst campus 
be delegated the authority to establish and modify 
from time to time at his discretion the fees and 
charges for said services and materials , and be 
authorized to delegate said authority in whole or 
in part to the Provost of the Amherst campus. 

Further, to abolish the several departmental 
laboratory fee trust fund accounts maintained 
in the Campus Center of the Amherst campus and 
authorize the transfer of any balances remaining 
in said trust fund accounts into the University 
of Massachusetts/Amherst Instructional Trust Fund. 



The next item, he said, was a Continuing Resolution, 
which is necessary as a contingency to enable the President to 
operate the University until the budget for FY 1978 has been act- 
ed on by the Legislature. On motion made and seconded, it was 



432' 



Board 
6/1/77 

Services Trust 

Fund 

(Doc. T77-102) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Instructional 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T77-103) 



-19- 



Continuing 
Resolution 



Board 
6/1/77 



UM/Worcester — 
Report on 
Group Practice 
Plan Budget 

Trust Fund Loan 
(Doc. T77-117) 



UM/Worcester — 
Contingency 
Plans for the 
University 
Hospital 
(Doc. T77-123) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the President be authorized to approve and 
adopt the policies and procedures governing the 
expenditure of state and non-state funds by the 
three campuses, the Office of the President and 
the Institute for Governmental Services from 
July 1, 1977 until such time as the Board of 
Trustees adopts the Operating Budget for Fiscal 
Year 1978. 

The approval of expenditure of said funds shall 
be consistent with the applicable state statutes 
governing the FY78 appropriation and in accordance 
with trustee policy. 

The May 18 meeting, he said, concluded with a Report 
on the Group Practice Plan Budget — UM/Worcester . The discussion 
included a possible means for covering any shortfall in revenues 
for FY 1977. 

At the meeting of the Committee held earlier in the 
day, he said, it had heard a report for a Trust Fund Loan (Doc. 
T77-117) to be established on the Amherst Campus. This was neces 
sitated, he said, because the Department of Administration and 
Finance had impounded certain funds , which action was being con- 
tested by University Counsel at the present time. The controvers 
centers around whether the dining commons at UM/Amherst is sub- 
ject to the meal tax. The emergency loan is necessary to cover 
expenses until such time as the impounded funds are released, at 
which time it will be repaid. It was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor of the Amherst campus 
to transfer $193,000 from the Boarding Hall Trust 
Fund UM/Amherst to meet immediate payments due in 
the various advance accounts where funds have been 
impounded by the State Department of Corporations 
and Taxation. This transfer shall be considered 
an emergency loan and shall be repaid as soon as 
the impounded funds are released. 

Trustee Burack asked if this loan would in any way 
penalize the students. Treasurer Johnson assured her that it 
would not. 

The final item, said Acting Chairman Carlson, was the 
matter of Contingency Plans for the University Hospital — UM/ 
Worcester (Doc. T77-123). He said this is an emergency means of 
keeping the Hospital open until such time as action occurs on the 
deficiency request. On motion made and seconded, it was 



-20- 



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4329 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the President to transfer on a 

temporary basis, funds from various University 
trust fund accounts to the Hospital Services 
Trust Fund as follows: 

Parking & Transportation Trust 

Fund 1MB 75,000 

Health Services Trust Fund UMB 50,000 

Food Services Trust Fund UMB 30,000 

Boarding Hall Trust Fund UMB 225,000 

Repayment of any transfers so made shall be 
completed with interest at 5 percent by no 
later than June 30, 1978. All interest paid 
shall be credited to the Trust Fund Interest 
account. 

Further, to authorize the President to take 
whatever other administrative steps are nec- 
essary to assure an orderly close of the 
fiscal year for the University Hospital. 

Acting Chairman Carlson asked Trustee Robertson to re- 
port for the Committee on Health Affairs. Trustee Robertson 
said the first action recommended by the Committee on Health Af- 
fairs was of a technical rather than a substantive nature. He 
said that last month the Board had approved a fringe benefit 
package and that vote referred to Document T75-144A, the Group 
Practice Rules and Regulations , which were rescinded earlier in 
this meeting when revised Rules and Regulations were adopted. It 
is now necessary to tie the fringe benefit package to the revised 
Rules and Regulations. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chancellor/Dean of the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester to continue imple- 
mentation of the fringe benefit program as approved 
by the Board on May 4, 1977, pursuant to the re- 
quirements of Section 12 and 14 of the revised 
Rules and Regulations of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Medical School Group Practice (Trustee 
Document T77-121) . 

The second action recommended by the Health Affairs 
Committee, he said, related to a review of the Medical Center 
By-laws — UM/Worcester . Two weeks ago the most recent set of rec- 
ommendations were received from the Joint Commission on Hospital 
Accreditation. Since this is a 70-page document, it has not yet 
been completely reviewed by the campus, and, therefore, the campus 
has requested that the review of the By-laws mandated by the 
Trustees be postponed until a later date. On motion made and 
seconded, it was 



Board 
6/1/77 



-21- 



Report of 
Committee on 
Health Affairs 



4330 



Board 
6/1/77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To change the date for submission of revisions 
to the Medical Center By-Laws to October, 1977. 

Acting Chairman Carlson then turned to the last item 
of agenda, the Report of the Delegate to the Board of Higher 
Education. Trustee Troy said that he had not attended the last 
meeting of BHE and, therefore, had no report to make. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 4:45 p.m. 



I 





Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 23, 1977; 11:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood 



Trustees Baker, Batiste, Breyer, Crain, Marks, McNeil, Morgenthau, 
Shearer, Troy; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mr. Parks 
representing Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, 
recorder. 

Absent Trustees : Trustees Burack, Carlson, Clark, Dennis, Field- 
ing, Gordon, McNulty, Okin, Robertson, Romer, Rowland, Spiller, 
Winthrop. 

Office of the President : Ms. Hanson, Budget Director and Assoc- 
iate Vice President; Mr. White, Director of University Relations. 

UM/Boston: Mr. Baker, Personnel Office. 



Guest: Ms. Pinck, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 11:09 a.m. The first] Ratification 
item of business was the Agreement Between the University of Mass- of Collective 
achusetts at Boston and the University of Massachusetts Patrol- Bargaining 
men's Association, (Doc. T77-127 ) . The meeting was told that thisj Agreement 

(Doc. T77-127) 



was the last of the series of collective bargaining agreements 
with classified personnel. Ratification of the agreement was 
needed prior to the end of the fiscal year, which in the case of 
matters dealing with wages and salaries was June 27, 1977, if the 
patrolmen at Boston were to receive adjustments already paid to 
all other University employees. The agreement followed the patt- 
ern of previously approved agreements. In the brief discussion 
which followed it was agreed that articles in future agreements 
dealing with anti-discrimination and affirmative action would be 
so phrased as to refer to individuals as well as groups of people. 

There was no further discussion and it was moved and 
seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the Agreement Between the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts and the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Patrolmen's Association at 
Boston, (Doc. T77-127) ; provided, however, that 
no wage increase as specified in said Agreement 
shall become effective until the Governor has 
transferred sufficient funds to the University's 
maintenance accounts to meet the cost of the 
salary increases provided by the said Agreement. 



4332 



Board 
6/23/77 



Ad Hoc Committee 
to recommend 
process for 
selection of 
President 



Next regular 
session of 
Board of 
Trustees July 28 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey then said there was one other item of 
business. He reminded the Trustees that he had told them of his 
intention to nominate an ad hoc committee to recommend to the 
Board the process of selecting a president. If it was agreeable 
to the Board, the committee would consist of Trustee Morgenthau, 
Chairman, and Trustees Baker, Marks, Shearer, and Troy. There was 
general agreement that this was a well chosen committee. 

After an informal caucus of the new committee the meet- 
ing was told that the committee would report to the Board towards 
the end of July. The Trustees then agreed to schedule the next 
regular meeting of the Board of Trustees on Thursday, July 28, 
1977 at 2:00 p.m. instead of August. The agenda of the meeting 
would include the report of the ad hoc committee and the question 
of reconsidering the June 1, 1977 vote on athletic tuition waivers 

There was no further business to come before the Board, 
and the meeting was adjourned at 11:22 a.m. 




•KJ-ctJ 



ladysfl Keith Hardy Q 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



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I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 




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^^ I UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

% Wi' v AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 

•J863 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 

JUN29 1977 

RECEIVE J [ 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSE1TS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON ■ WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



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I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 







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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST . BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



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WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 19 77, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 

JUN 2 9 1977 

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 








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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST . BOSTON - WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 







WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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% ^y?v AMHERST - BOSTON . WORCESTER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 

WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 19 77, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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I UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

\ WW v AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 

y 'i863- 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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% ttf v AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 19 77, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 




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\ Wkfl v AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 




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h | UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

% WJf v AMHERST . BOSTON - WORCESTER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1971, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 





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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST . BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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OTFICE OF THE 

JUL 1 2 1977 . 

REC J clJ' 



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I UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

% WW v AMHERST • BOSTON ■ WORCESTER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 







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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 






WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1911, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 







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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON . WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON ■ WORCESTER 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



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WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23 , 1911 , at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



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WAIVER 

I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 19 77, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON - WORCESTER 



•J863 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



WAIVER 



I hereby waive notice of the special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees held on June 23, 1977, at the 
Office of the President, One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts, pursuant to Section 2, Article II of the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees. 





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